Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

As explained before, using PyRun_SimpleString seems to be a bad idea. You should definitely use the methods provided by the C-API (http://docs.python.org/c-api/). Reading the introduction is the first thing to do to understand the way it works. First, you have to learn about PyObject that is the basic object for the C API. It can represent any kind of ...


14

The example code you used is for ancient Python version, 2.3.2. Python 3.x line introduced a number of incompatibilites not only in the language but in the C API as well. The functions you mention simply no longer exist in Python 3.2. PyString_ functions were renamed to PyBytes_. PyInt_ functions are gone, PyLong_ should be used instead. Here's the same ...


13

Here is a C++ friendly solution I have developed lately. I explain a few details of it on my blog: Python sys.stdout redirection in C++ where I also point to repository at my GitHub where most recent version can be found. Here is complete example based on the current code at the time of posting this answer: #include <functional> #include ...


11

You need to call PySys_SetArgv(int argc, char **argv, int updatepath) for the relative imports to work. This will add the path of the script being executed to sys.path if updatepath is 0 (refer to the docs for more information). The following should do the trick #include <Python.h> int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { Py_SetProgramName(argv[0]); /* ...


10

This is basically an adaptation of how the IronPython console handles Ctrl-C. If you want to check the source, it's in BasicConsole and CommandLine.Run. First, start up the IronPython engine on a separate thread (as you assumed). When you go to run the user's code, wrap it in a try ... catch(ThreadAbortException) block: var engine = Python.CreateEngine(); ...


9

Check the result of the PyImport_ImportModule call: It fails and returns NULL. That is because by default, the current directory is not in the search path. Add PySys_SetPath("."); // before .. mymod = PyImport_ImportModule("reverse"); to add the current directory to the module search path and make your example work.


9

you need to specify userscript and not userscript.py also use PyImport_ImportModule it directly takes a char * userscript.py means module py in package userscript this code works for me: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <Python.h> int main(void) { const char *scriptDirectoryName = "/tmp"; Py_Initialize(); ...


8

I have used Py_NewInterpreter for different interpreters in different threads, but this should also work for several interpreters within one thread: In the main thread: Py_Initialize(); PyEval_InitThreads(); mainThreadState = PyEval_SaveThread(); For each interpreter instance (in any thread): // initialize interpreter PyEval_AcquireLock(); ...


7

Have you tried Tiny Python?


6

Callin Py_Initialize() twice won't work well, however Py_NewInterpreter can work, depending on what you're trying to do. Read the docs carefully, you have to hold the GIL when calling this.


6

__import__ doesn't put the module in any namespace at all, but returns it instead. import calls __import__, plus it stores the result in a variable. The docs say that import spam does something similar to: spam = __import__('spam', globals(), locals(), [], 0) To get the same effect in the C API, you need to assign to the emb global. In other words, set ...


6

To run the interpreters interactive loop, you should use the function PyRun_InteractiveLoop(). Otherwise, your code will behave as if it were written in a Python script file, not entered interactively. Edit: Here's the full code of a simple interactive interpreter: #include <Python.h> int main() { Py_Initialize(); ...


5

I found cross-platform solution. Before invoke any other python code just execute following python lines: import sys sys.path.append("C:\\source\\\\modules")


5

You do this by looking at the exception that was raised. Currently you wipe the exception (that's what PyErr_Clear() does.) Don't do that, and instead print the traceback or inspect the exception object. See http://docs.python.org/c-api/exceptions.html for information on how to do that from C code, but usually the best idea is to just let the exception ...


4

I think I found the answer - by including the mysterious apple linker flags: -undefined dynamic_lookup -bundle I was able to get it built and it seems to work OK. I'd be very interested if anyone has any references about these flags or library handling on OS X in general. Now I see them I remember being bitten by the same thing in the past - yet I'm ...


4

If I'm reading your question correctly, you want to capture stdout/stderr into a variable within your C++? You can do this by redirecting stdout/stderr into a python variable and then querying this variable into your C++. Please not that I have not done the proper ref counting below: #include <Python.h> #include <string> int main(int argc, ...


4

One way: g = PyDict_New(); if (!g) return NULL; PyDict_SetItemString(g, "__builtins__", PyEval_GetBuiltins()); And then pass g as globals.


4

The PySys_SetPath(".") cleared the python path, so it could no longer find any library whatsoever. What you really need to do is import sys.path and then append your string to it: PyObject *sys = PyImport_ImportModule("sys"); PyObject *path = PyObject_GetAttrString(sys, "path"); PyList_Append(path, PyString_FromString(".")); (I didn't test the above ...


4

This happens because including Python.h first indirectly includes termios.h, which defines B0 to be 0, which in turn qpagedpaintdevice.h want's to use as a variable name. Including Python.h after the Qt includes does pretty much the same thing the other way around with the string 'slots'. I suggest the following order: #include <Python.h> #undef B0 ...


4

Simple answer is yes you can. int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { /* Setup */ Py_NoSiteFlag = 1; // <--- This Py_SetProgramName(argv[0]); Py_Initialize(); /* Run the 'main' module */ int rtn = Py_Main(argc, argv); Py_Finalize(); return rtn; } As far as I can tell, nothing breaks and you can continue to use everything (including the ...


4

Your problem is that PyDict_GetItemString(pDict, "path") will return python list and it is not callable. And when you execute PyObject_CallObject(pFunc, NULL); you will execute it. This is equal to sys.path(). This should work: PyObject *pName, *pModule, *pDict, *list, *pValue, *item; int n, i; char *name; Py_Initialize(); std::string strModule = ...


3

Here is a sample code I wrote (with the help of various online sources) to send a string to a Python code, then return a value. Here is the C code call_function.c: #include <Python.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main() { // Set PYTHONPATH TO working directory setenv("PYTHONPATH",".",1); PyObject *pName, *pModule, *pDict, *pFunc, *pValue, ...


3

Try it with the start symbol set to Py_file_input and use PyEval_GetBuiltins. Edit: the correct dict key to set is "__builtins__".


3

As mentioned in the C API documentation, the O format code for Py_BuildValue increments the reference count on its argument, so you are leaking a reference to params_list. You can fix this by either adding a Py_DECREF call or by using the N format code instead, which acts like O but takes ownership of its argument.


3

On Windows the program search path and the shared library search path are controled by the same environment variable, PATH. To embed Python, you need to put the directory that contains python32.dll, typically c:\python3.2, on your PATH. Explanations how to change PATH on Windows are easily googled; see for example this videocast that explains it for running ...


3

Alright, I ended up deciding to strip all the possible parameters from bjam and build from the start. I finally got bjam to build every target possible using this command line: bjam --user-config=user-config.jam --with-python Where user-config.jam only contains the following: using python : 3.3 : C:\\Development\\Python-3.3.0\\PCBuild\\python.exe : ...


3

The Python interpreter will run inside your C++ process, so all its output will go to the stderr and stdout of the C++ program itself. How to capture this output is described in this answer. Note that with this approach you won't need to capture the output in the Python script any more -- just let it go to stdout and capture everything at once in C++.


3

Even if you implement a module in Python, the user would have to import it. This is the way Python works, and it's actually a good thing - it's one of the great pluses of Python - the namespace/module system is robust, easy to use and simple to understand. For academic exercises only, you could of course add your new functionality to Python itself, by ...


3

You can, but I'd recommend you not to re-implement a Python interpreter when there is a standard implementation. Use boost::python to interface with Python.


3

I was facing nearly the same problem but at the end I sticked Boost::Python ;) However an option to Boost::Python is Swig. If you use Swig you also, don't have to write so much boilerplate code than you have to with Boost::Python.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible