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You can also use scipy for that: #!/usr/bin/env python import scipy.misc import numpy as np # Image size width = 640 height = 480 channels = 3 # Create an empty image img = np.zeros((height, width, channels), dtype=np.uint8) # Draw something (http://stackoverflow.com/a/10032271/562769) xx, yy = np.mgrid[:height, :width] circle = (xx - 100) ** 2 + (yy - ...


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Not PIL, but scipy.misc.imread might still be interesting: import scipy.misc im = scipy.misc.imread('um_000000.png', flatten=False, mode='RGB') print(im.shape) gives (480, 640, 3) so it is (height, width, channels). So the pixel at position (x, y) is color = tuple(im[y][x]) r, g, b = color


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Not PIL, but scipy.misc.imread might still be interesting: import scipy.misc im = scipy.misc.imread('um_000000.png', flatten=False, mode='RGB') print(im.shape) gives (480, 640, 3) so it is (height, width, channels). So you can iterate over it by for y in range(im.shape[0]): for x in range(im.shape[1]): color = tuple(im[y][x]) r, g, ...


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Something like this should work from PIL import Image W = 200 H = 200 img = Image.new("RGB", (W, H)) pixel_list = [(i%256,i%256,i%256) for i in range(W*H)] i_pixel = 0 for x in range(W): for y in range(H): img.putpixel((x, y), pixel_list[i_pixel]) i_pixel += 1 img.save('result.png') With the following result Note: I read here the ...


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3 years later, I know, but this can work just fine! The standard build process will not look for libraries in /usr/lib64, but you can't specify a library path when running setup.py build, so you need to rebuild the binaries afterwards in a separate step: yum install freetype-devel libpng-devel libjpeg-turbo-devel libzip-devel lcms-devel pip download PIL ...


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I can only guess what you are trying to do, so my first attempt would be this: convert jelly.jpg \( -size 1140x100! gradient:none-black \) -gravity south -composite -pointsize 36 -fill white -annotate +0+20 "Title Treatment" result.png The important parts are that the gradient goes from black to transparent rather than black to white, else you will get ...


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In Python 3, you may need to use BytesIO: from io import BytesIO ... outputBuffer = BytesIO() bg.save(outputBuffer, format='JPEG') bgBase64Data = outputBuffer.getvalue() # http://stackoverflow.com/q/16748083/2603230 return 'data:image/jpeg;base64,' + base64.b64encode(bgBase64Data).decode()


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I think what you're trying to do could be solved in a very general way by using coroutines as described in PEP 342 — Coroutines via Enhanced Generators. Below is code to handle creating and laying-out thumbnail images onto a grid of any size. It will potentially generate multiple thumbnail pages, depending on how many images there are and how many will fit ...


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The if block should be followed by an else block, so that "normal" pixels that do not meet your criteria retain their original values. from PIL import Image im = Image.open('leaf.jpg') pixelMap = im.load() img = Image.new( im.mode, im.size) pixelsNew = img.load() for i in range(img.size[0]): for j in range(img.size[1]): if 205 in pixelMap[i,j]: ...


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Do not iterate over the image list for every position, consume the list instead: for i in xrange(0, 2100, 700): for j in xrange(0, 2400, 400): try: filepath = npath.pop(0) except IndexError: break im = Image.open(filepath) im.thumbnail((1000,1000)) # paste the image at location i,j ...


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I haven't found a way that doesn't involve checking every pixel, but I found my answer in rules for filling. I used the even-odd rule.


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Your problem could be that the image file "James.png" is not in the same directory as your script, in your example on your Desktop. Is that the case? Cheers


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I would suggest using Keras (which is a deep learning abstraction layer on top of Theano or TensorFlow). It already has built-in a ImageDataGenerator. You could essentially use it to generate different images (rotated, expanded, padded) from your dataset.


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I would give the PIL or the Pillow package a try. PIL documentation: http://www.pythonware.com/products/pil/ Pillow documentation: https://pillow.readthedocs.io/en/3.3.x/ If you want to convert your images into numpy arrays and process them that way than here are some examples to do that: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/577591-conversion-of-pil-image-...


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The image is black because it is only partially visible on the Canvas. I replaced canvas.create_image(0,0, image=worldr1) by canvas.create_image(0,0, anchor="nw", image=worldr1) and the full image was visible on the Canvas (the default value is anchor="center").


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For anyone working with an image in "1" mode (i.e., 1-bit pixels, black and white, stored with one pixel per byte -- see docs), you need to convert it into "L" mode before calling PIL.ImageOps.invert. Thus: im = im.convert('L') im = ImageOps.invert(im) im = im.convert('1')


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First, install pillow (having virtualenv activated preferably) with: pip install pillow You should import it in Django project: from PIL import Image After that you don't need to change settings or anything else. All the modules should work.


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The default save quality for jpg in Pillow is 75. I bet your original image is saved with a higher quality setting. The image quality, on a scale from 1 (worst) to 95 (best). The default is 75. Values above 95 should be avoided; 100 disables portions of the JPEG compression algorithm, and results in large files with hardly any gain in image quality....


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You're trying to open the base64 decoded contents of the file, you're supposed to open the file itself. PIL.Image.open(self.image) take this for example, to reproduce the error you're getting >>> open('\0') Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> TypeError: file() argument 1 must be encoded string ...


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You can wrap over the edges using numpy.take, for example with a 3x3 cropping window: a = numpy.arange(100).reshape((10,10)) a.take([8,9,10], mode="wrap", axis=1).take([9,10,11], mode="wrap", axis=0) It also accepts lists of lists for indices, for instance two cropping windows: b = a.take([[8,9,10],[3,4,5]], mode="wrap", axis=1).take([[9,10,11],[9,10,11]]...


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PIL was never ported to Python 3, so Pillow forked the project and took it over. Pillow has since been back-ported to Python 2, but if you are working with Python 3, you must use Pillow. They are essentially the same. If you want the source code of PIL, just download it and look within the files yourself. If you want the documentation for PIL, this is a ...


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No. I think it is difference project. https://pillow.readthedocs.io/en/latest/installation.html When you want to install pillow, you must uninstall PIL


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OKAY! So. It appears that I've been working with corrupted image files the entire time, hence the errors.


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An alternative to converting the image is to create an RGB index from the palette. from PIL import Image def chunk(seq, size, groupByList=True): """Returns list of lists/tuples broken up by size input""" func = tuple if groupByList: func = list return [func(seq[i:i + size]) for i in range(0, len(seq), size)] def getPaletteInRgb(...


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I know this issue has been solved already, but I'm just adding this because it might be of some use to people who are looking for a way to extract ICC profile information in Python. As part of the jpylyzer software (of which I'm the main developer), I once wrote some Python code for extracting the main header fields of an ICC profile (this is completely ...


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I am not proficien in PIL, but it looks there is an image.Convert("RGB") method that may or may not work, so give it a try. However, if your intention is to continue using np.array then the following will work: im=np.array(im) imRGB = np.repeat(im[:, :, np.newaxis], 3, axis=2) Basically it repeats the input np.array into a 3rd new axis, 3 times. imRGB[:,...


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You have made a silly mistake. In Line 6 You have written pixelsNew = im.load() instead of pixelsNew = img.load() This should work now. from PIL import Image im = Image.open('nuvfits1.png') pixelMap = im.load() img = Image.new( im.mode, im.size) pixelsNew = img.load() for i in range(img.size[0]): for j in range(img.size[1]): if 205 in pixelMap[...


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One option is to import modules from a relative path as described here. It is also possible to use virtual environments where you pack everything you need and don´t mess with python installations on the server. Look it here and here Other references: Loading all modules in a folder in Python How to do relative imports in Python?


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This helped me to find the solution! Your code opens the image in the browser (which is ok, because I didnt say I wanted it as a download). To get a download dialog, the code is: response = HttpResponse(content_type='image/jpg') cropped_image.save(response, "JPEG") response['Content-Disposition'] = 'attachment; filename="piece.jpg"' return ...


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HttpResponse expects string or an iterator. More details in docs: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.9/ref/request-response/#django.http.HttpResponse.init Did you try something like this? response = HttpResponse(mimetype='image/jpg') cropped_image.save(response, "JPEG") return response


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You could change... for i in range(0, 4250, 1): valaro = Image.open('pngs/valaro_800.png') ...to... original = Image.open('pngs/valaro_800.png') for i in range(0, 4250, 1): valaro = original.copy() ...so the image is only loaded once, but I suspect this will only provide a minor performance gain.


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In your terminal, run python3 -m pip install <module_name>. pip has likely installed the module for python2, which you can verify by running help("modules") in python2 and python3. Running pip -V will also tell you which version of Python pip is installing modules for.


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Solved: I finally figured it out! I had a 32 bit and a 64 bit version of python installed. I had pillow installed to my 32 bit directory, so when python ran from 32 bit was why I got the win32 error. And when I ran python 64bit it said module not found. Uninstalled both and reinstalled the 64 bit to the normal install direc in C, reinstalled 64 bit pillow ...


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The following code works on images from a microscope (which are similar), to prepare them prior to stitching. I used it on a test set of 20 images, with reasonable results. The brightness average function is from another Stackoverflow question. from PIL import Image from PIL import ImageStat import math # function to return average brightness of an image ...


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As per my comment since it helped you out and answered your problem: The issue that you were seeing is that you had pip version 1.5.6, and the version of pip does dictate how packages are unzipped, which ultimately determines whether or not modules are loaded properly. All that is needed is: pip install --upgrade pip Which allows pip to upgrade itself. ...


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try import skimage import random from random import randint import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt xrow = raw_input("Enter the number of rows to be present in image.=>") row = int(xrow) ycolumn = raw_input("Enter the number of columns to be present in image.=>") column = int(ycolumn) A = np.zeros((row,column)) for x in xrange(1, row): ...


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Try to use an absolute path. Like this: background.save('/path/to/test/test.png') or even this: import os background.save(os.path.join(os.path.dirname(os.path.abspath(__file__)), 'test.png')) This will save file in the same directory as your script


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using the jupyter qt-console interpreter, or jupyter notebook you can set the interpreter environment magic %pylab inline so that images will be displayed inline and the matplotlib.pylab namespace and numpy namespaces will be imported into the current namespace. All this means though is that you don't have to prefix the commands with matplotlib.pylab.plot ...


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You forgot to instantiate BytesIO class. Change img_file = io.BytesIO to img_file = io.BytesIO()



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