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11

One problem with this approach is that you will eventually run out of stack, because we have a pair of mutually recursive functions. Each call uses up memory in the stack, which is never recovered. This isn't obvious with an interactive program since it will take a long time to create enough recursive calls, but if we speed things up: def power_of_two(x): ...


8

The most Pythonic approach: result = max(pairs, key=m)


7

This functionality can be found in the importlib.machinery module. Inside, there are numerous constants which relate to the various Python module extensions: >>> import importlib >>> importlib.machinery.SOURCE_SUFFIXES ['.py', '.pyw'] >>> importlib.machinery.OPTIMIZED_BYTECODE_SUFFIXES ['.pyo'] >>> ...


7

numpy.bincount has a weights parameter which does just what you need: In [36]: np.bincount(a, weights=b) Out[36]: array([ 13., 103., 6.])


6

If you just have a numpy array then why not convert it to a string directly for writing to your file? You can do this using str.join which accepts an iterable (list, numpy array, etc). import numpy as np arr = np.array(['K', 'R', 'K', 'P', 'T', 'T', 'K', 'T', 'K', 'R', 'G', 'L']) s = ''.join(arr) # KRKPTTKTKRGL


6

Use set logic. It is specifically designed for this task. a = set(list1) b = set(list2) companies_in_both = a & b (This will produce a set as the output. If you need it as a list, just pass the set to list().)


6

Use the built-in function round(), example: >>> round(4.7532,2) 4.75 >>> round(4.7294,2) 4.73


5

Because it's how input works. See https://docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#input You have to use raw_input instead.


5

That book is written for Python 3. The old Python 2 input() function works differently to the Python 3 input(). As mentioned in the docs linked by troolee, Python 2 input() is equivalent to eval(raw_input(prompt)), which is convenient, but can also be dangerous since any input string is evaluated. So to run Python 3 code examples on Python 2 you need to ...


5

Yes, there is! It's called properties. Read Only Properties class Test(object): def __init__(self,a,b): self.a = a self.b = b @property def c(self): return self.a + self.b With the above code, c is now a read-only property of the Test class. Mutable Properties You can also give a property a setter, which would make ...


4

Try cmd = re.search('^.*\d*% packet loss.*$', ping_result[int(i)], re.M|re.I) print cmd.group() '^' and '$' match the start and end of a line, respectively. You also don't need the parentheses unless you want to select the packet loss separately.


4

A linear recurrence such as this can be computed using scipy.signal.lfilter: In [19]: from scipy.signal import lfilter In [20]: num = np.array([1.0]) In [21]: alpha = 2.0 In [22]: den = np.array([1.0, -alpha]) In [23]: a = np.zeros((4,4)) In [24]: a[0,:] = [1,2,3,4] In [25]: lfilter(num, den, a, axis=0) Out[25]: array([[ 1., 2., 3., 4.], ...


4

Numpy's vector calculations act on the vector, not as a sequence of steps, so you have to vectorize the entire expression. For example: np.multiply(np.arange(1,5), 2**np.arange(0,4)[np.newaxis].T) To address the "final" question, yes you have to keep the for loop if you want to do a sequential calculation. You might make it more efficient with map or ...


4

attrgetter is designed to be used in places where a function is required as a replacement for lambda. For example: # equivalent heads = map(attrgetter('head'), objs) heads = map(lambda o: o.head, objs) In other words, the point of attrgetter is to create a side-effect-free function that returns a useful value, and which can be used in expressions that ...


4

Using a dictionary, you can make the key an array. card = {'1 of hearts': '1', '2 of hearts': '2', 'ace of hearts':["1", "11"]} You can then access the first variable by using: print(card['ace of hearts'][0]) You can then access the second variable by using: print(card['ace of hearts'][1]) If you want to store the array in the key as integers, you ...


4

Move the check inside of the wrapped_f def __call__(self, f): def wrapped_f(*args, **kwargs): if not permitted: raise Exception("not authenticated to do that") f(*args, **kwargs) return wrapped_f Outside of the wrapped_f, it is checked at the creation of the function. Inside, it becomes part of the body of the new ...


4

You can use sort or sorted with the key to use A.index of the current word. >>> sorted(B, key = A.index) ['cat', 'dog', 'dog', 'horse', 'bird', 'rabbit']


4

Not that algorithmic complexity matters for such small lists, but you can avoid Omega(n*m): ranks = dict((value, idx) for idx, value in enumerate(A)) B.sort(key = ranks.get) A more concise way to write the first line is: ranks = dict(map(reversed, enumerate(A))) ... but I can't decide whether that's too tricksy for public consumption!


4

Use zip() to pair up the lists: {'video': [{'title': title, 'id': id} for title, id in zip(titles, ids)]} The video value is formed by a list comprehension; for every title, id pair formed by zip() a dictionary is created: >>> titles = ['New', 'New'] >>> ids = ['123', '123'] >>> {'video': [{'title': title, 'id': id} for title, ...


4

you need double underline at __in and you dont need Q here. a_questions = Questions.objects.filter(role=role, ideal_behaviour__in=ib)


3

You're right, your code seems to be having difficulty as soon as it gets beyond the small_primes table. Looking more closely, there's an error here: for _ in range(r - 1): x = pow(x, 2, n) if x == n - 1: break else: return False You want to return False (i.e. composite) if you never find x == n-1 (or you ...


4

There is no way to print its aliased name. Many names can refer to the same class. Classes in Python are just values like any other, and they can be assigned to names arbitrarily. Your import statment is just an assignment. It's like asking, how can I find the name of the object in this scenario: a = b = c = MyClass() d = a Which name is "the real" ...


3

The problem are these two lines: boyList = [readBoyNames] girlList = [readGirlNames] readBoyNames and readGirlNames are already lists. You are creating a list containing another list. If you change those two lines to boyList= readBoyNames girlList= readGirlNames it works with no problems.


3

_id is automatically added by Django. there are reasions for it. your db table RedditPost doesnot just have this column whatsoever.. after changing the table (by adding this new column), do: if django version < 1.7: (south needs to be installed) python manage.py schemamigration yourapp --auto python manage.py migrate yourapp if django ...


3

You can simply use dict.items() in both Python 2 and 3, foo = [key for key, value in some_dict.items() if value['marked']] Or you can simply roll your own version of items generator, like this def get_items(dict_object): for key in dict_object: yield key, dict_object[key] And then use it like this for key, value in get_items({1: 2, 3: 4}): ...


3

The easiest way is to not care about the list being created by just using dict.items(): foo = [key for key, value in some_dict.items() if value['marked']] The next option is to use an exception handler: try: # Python 2 iter_some_dict = some_dict.iteritems except AttributeError: # Python 3 iter_some_dict = some_dict.items foo = [key for ...


3

Use None as the default value, and calculate the values inside the function, like this def plot_psi(n, l, start=(0.001*bohr),stop=None,step=(0.005*bohr)): if stop is None: stop = ((30*n-10)*bohr)


3

Iterate with enumerate function, filter out all the elements which are foo and get only their index, like this >>> [index for index, item in enumerate(a) if item == "foo"] [0, 1, 2, 3, 4] After the edit, the question changed drastically. But this solution would work >>> a = ['foo', 'foo', 'foo', 'foo', 'foo', 'bar', 'bar', 'bar', ...


3

Python 2’s plain '-quoted strings represent strings of bytes; Python 3’s represent strings of characters. The equivalents in the opposite language are bytes (b'literal') and unicode (u'literal'), respectively. % python3 -c "from sys import stdout; stdout.buffer.write(b'a' * 72 + b'\xff\xbe\xbf\xff\n')" | hexdump -x


3

You are creating your list for each row, rather than create the list just once outside the loop. You are also reinventing the CSV wheel; use the csv module instead. Because you are picking just the one column for each row where a condition is met, you can use a list comprehension: import csv with open("C:\\test.txt", "r") as infile: reader = ...



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