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23

Here is a technique to make a one-character-at-a-time file iterator: from functools import partial with open("file.data") as f: for char in iter(partial(f.read, 1), ''): # now do something interesting with the characters ... The with-statement opens the file and unconditionally closes it when you're finished. The usual way to read ...


8

You meant to do a[1:3], not a[1:2]. Note the rules on Python slice indexing: the slice [start:end] goes from start to end-1. a=[0]*4 a[1:3] = [100,200] a # [0, 100, 200, 0]


6

Use comprehension: list_of_strings = [s + string_to_add for s in list_of_strings]


5

Just return the result of a simple test for str.isalpha() plus a length test: return len(s) == 2 and s.isalpha() For byte strings in the default C locale (e.g. you didn't change the locale with the locale module) that'll only be true for strings containing two ASCII letters (uppercase or lowercase). If you must use a regular expression, then anchor the ...


5

Use list-comprehensions: [foo.bar for foo in foos] (You can wrap it with def bars(foos):, but I think it's more readable without it)


4

aa = [item + '12' for item in a]


4

You can try using "lists". On status list you can add all the words you want. status = ['deleted', ''] Object.objects.filter(country_send=country).exclude(status__in=status).order_by('-id') More about list: http://www.sthurlow.com/python/lesson06/


4

You don't insert any data into d2. I suppose it should be like this: d2 = {} with open('file2.txt', 'r') as file2: for row in file2: cols = row.strip().split() d2[cols[1]] = cols[0] with open('file1.txt', 'r') as file1: for row in file1: cols = row.strip().split() print ("%s\t%s" % (d2[cols[0]], d2[cols[1]])) On ...


4

The Python C code that handles slicing for objects that implement the sq_slice slot, cannot handle any integers over Py_ssize_t (== sys.maxsize). The sq_slice slot is the C-API equivalent of the __getslice__ special method. For a two-element slice, Python 2 uses one of the SLICE+* opcodes; this is then handled by the apply_slice() function. This uses the ...


4

If you are using the numpy library, you can use numpy's more advanced slicing to accomplish this like so: import numpy as np x = np.array([[1, 2, 3, 4], [5, 6, 7, 8], [9, 10, 11, 12]]) print x[0:2, 2:4] # ^^^ ^^^ # rows cols # Result: [[3 4] [7 8]] (more info in the numpy docs) If you don't want to use ...


4

Each time countup() calls itself, it'll eventually return to that same point where it called. The next line will then print n, as it was during that function call. And each time you call a function, all its names are created anew, they are local. As such, each time you call countup() you have a local, independent value for n. Essentially you create a chain ...


4

It uses recursion to print the numbers. The best way to understand this is by an example: countup(3) countup(2) countup(1) countup(0) n == 0 print('Blastoff!') print (1) print(2) print(3) Each time the function is called, it calles the same function with n-1, until n==0. At this point, it begins printing numbers as shown. ...


3

Properties only work on new-style classes. Your Celsius class needs to inherit from object. Also note that it is much more idiomatic these days to write a property as a decorator: class Celsius(object): def __init__(self, temperature = 0): self.temperature = temperature def to_fahrenheit(self): return (self.temperature * 1.8) + 32 ...


3

You can remove them with this list comprehension: [p for p in people if not any(p in p2 for p2 in people if p != p2)] This iterates over each person p, then checks the condition: not any(p in p2 for p2 in people if p != p2) This inner loop iterates over each person p2 (skipping the case where it is the same as p), and checks p in p2 (whether p is a ...


3

def yield_key_from_file1(): with open("file1.txt") as fp: for line in fp: k1, k2 = line.split() yield k1.strip() yield k2.strip() def get_dict_from_file2(): data = {} with open("file2.txt") as fp: for line in fp: value, key = line.split() data[key.strip()] = ...


3

You can get the total running time of your program with this: time python3 program.py in your terminal. It will have output similar to: real 0m0.184s user 0m0.032s sys 0m0.015s You can get how long it takes a particular function to run n times with: from timeit import timeit def foo(): return 123456789 + 987654321 n = 10000000 time = ...


3

I am not sure if your are looking for something like this. Your question is not completely clear to me .. listofkey1 = [] listofkey2 = [] mydict = {} with open('file1.txt', 'r') as file1: for row in file1: cols = row.split() listofkey1.append(cols[0]) listofkey2.append(cols[1]) with open('file2.txt', 'r') as file2: ...


3

I can't reproduce this on my machine, but it sounds like items in put into the queue haven't been flushed to the underlying pipe. This will cause a deadlock if you try to terminate the process, according to the docs: As mentioned above, if a child process has put items on a queue (and it has not used JoinableQueue.cancel_join_thread), then that process ...


3

You need to use a raw string >>> sys.path.append(r'd:\pyusb-1.0.0a2\usb') or escape the backslashes >>> sys.path.append('d:\\pyusb-1.0.0a2\\usb') or use forward slashes >>> sys.path.append('d:/pyusb-1.0.0a2/usb') Otherwise, Python will try to interpret \usb as a Unicode escape sequence (like \uBEEF) which fails for ...


3

You can't, not on instances. The property object needs to be part of the class for the descriptor protocol on which it relies to work. You can use the __getattr__, __setattr__ and __delattr__ hooks instead to proxy attribute access dynamically.


3

Using itertools.count and reduce (In Python 3.x, you need to use functools.reduce): import socket, itertools; s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM); s.bind(('', 5555)); s.listen(1); accepter = s.accept(); reduce(lambda x, y: accepter[0].recv(1024), itertools.count()) You can also use other infinite iterator like itertools.cycle or ...


3

It seems you have the + operators placed outside of your grouping. So with >+ this matches > literally between "one or more" times and using the dot . in conjuction with a repeated capturing group (.)+ only the last iteration will be captured, in this case 0 for each match result. Remove the beginning + operator and move the one placed outside of ...


3

So there are two problems to address here. First is that a joined thread will not respond to any signals. Fix that by looping to check for a signal once every second: while http_thread.is_alive(): http_thread.join(1) #similar for smtp_thread This will make your program respond to KeyboardInterrupt signals, but now you will notice that the whole ...


3

Not all internal object types are listed in the __builtin__ structure, no. You won't find the method type there either, nor the generator type, or many others. Only names that you'd actually use in your Python code are listed in that namespace. Some such types are listed in the types module, but the iterator type isn't, because, as the source states: # ...


3

Use os.path.expanduser() function to get a full valid path with "~" resolved and pass this to open() new_file = open(os.path.expanduser("~/Documents/")+name2+".txt", "a+") this will resolve "~" to something like /home/user and join it with the rest of the path elements.


3

This is because raw_input returns a str and you want an int. You can fix this: Hours = int(raw_input('Enter the value of Hours: \n')) Rate = int(raw_input('Enter the value of Rate: \n')) Pay = Hours * Rate Pay = round(Pay, 2) print Pay


3

Write a tearDown method: https://docs.python.org/3/library/unittest.html#unittest.TestCase.tearDown def tearDown(self): import os os.remove('some_file_to_test') Also have a look at the tempfile module and see if it's useful in this case.


2

This seems like an XY problem. I suspect that you could more easily create the correct output directly from your Java program. If you want help with that, please post a new question with your Java code illustrating what you are trying to do there. To answer this question directly, the problem is that print() calls str() to create a string representation of ...


2

I can guess, but you might want to tell us what kind of error you get when you execute the code (just a heads up for the next time you ask a question). There's a couple of mistakes: 1) The syntax of try all_digits is True: is wrong. The "try" statement should look like this: try: <your code> except <type of exception to catch>: ...


2

You can't. What you can do, is create another method and add that in list_display. From its documentation, list_display can take four kinds of values: A field of the model A callable (a function, or a lambda) that will take a model instance. The name of an attribute of the model class (this can be any function in the model class). The name of an attribute ...



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