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9

No, there are no other options here than a full set of loops, as you need to remove any 'E' strings from your values: {k: [i for i in v if i != 'E'] for k, v in mydict.iteritems() if k != 'E'} This rebuilds your dictionary, removing the 'E' key while we are at it, leaving you with a new dictionary that is entirely 'E'-less. If you want anything more ...


8

I think you are now trying to reinvent a key-value database. Maybe the easiest thing would be to check if sqlite3 module would offer you what you need. Using a readymade database is easier than rolling your own! Of course, sqlite3 is not a key-value DB (on the surface), so if you need something even simpler, have a look at LMDB and its Python bindings: ...


6

A common mistake. list*N does a shallow copy, e.g. in x = …; l = [x]*4 the l is the same as l = [x,x,x,x]. Now if x is a list, then you edit the references in multiple places. See How do I create a multidimensional list? in the official Python FAQ for more details. But the short version is: instead of [x]*4, write [x for _ in range(4)], and you'll get four ...


5

You can do return [compute_something(x).a_property_of_z for x in xs]


5

Edit: In this particular case, you could use a for-loop and iter: for inp in iter(input, 'quit'): print(inp) iter(input, 'quit') will keep calling the input function and assigning its return value to inp as long as this value does not equal 'quit'. No, you cannot perform inline assignments in Python. The grammar simply doesn't allow it (remember ...


5

#!/bin/bash python - 1 2 3 << EOF import sys print 'Argument List:', str(sys.argv) EOF Output: Argument List: ['-', '1', '2', '3']


5

Do you mean something like this? myjson = """ { "json": true } """ Python triple quoted string literals preserve newlines, etc so you can put them directly into your code. (triple single quotes would also work)...


4

Use the clipboard module: import clipboard clipboard.copy("line1\nline2") # now the clipboard content will be string "line1\nline2" clipboard.copy("line3") # add line3 text = clipboard.paste() # text will have the content of clipboard


4

If all you want to do is collect the a_property_of_z attributes, you can combine the calculation and the attribute access: return [compute_something(x).a_property_of_z for x in xs] The return value of compute_something() can be referenced directly in the list comprehension.


4

You can redirect output to file object by specifying it as stdout argument to subprocess.call. Put it in a context manager to write to file safely. with open('out.txt', 'w') as f: subprocess.call(cl, stdout=f) Or open the file in wb mode and use subprocess.check_output: with open('out.txt', 'wb') as f: f.write(subprocess.check_output(cl))


4

You have a single-precision float, in big-endian byte order: response = '\x41\x60\x00\x00' struct.unpack('>f', response) Demo: >>> import struct >>> struct.unpack('>f', '\x41\x60\x00\x00') (14.0,)


4

You can use os.path.getsize(filename) to get the size of your target file. Then as you read data from the file, you can calculate progress percentage using a simple formula currentBytesRead/filesize*100%. This calculation can be done at the end of every N lines. For the actual progress bar, you take a look at Text Progress Bar in the Console


4

You can check if the result of string_checker is 1 after each question: if output == 1: break The break statement will exit the loop immediately. By doing this, you won't need to have that condition in the while, so you can do an infinite while: while True: ...


4

You actually should use the if __name__ == "__main__" guard with ProcessPoolExecutor, too: It's using multiprocessing.Process to populate its Pool under the covers, just like multiprocessing.Pool does, so all the same caveats regarding picklability (especially on Windows), etc. apply. I believe that ProcessPoolExecutor is meant to eventually replace ...


4

Store the input in a variable, then test that variable text = input().lower() if text.startswith("z"): # etc


4

I would do the following, and also check that that key exists in your dictionary. d = {'1' : 'Test', '2':'Assignments', '3':'Homeworks'} start_prompt = ['1', '2', '5'] subject = [d[i] for i in start_prompt if i in d] >>> subject ['Test', 'Assignments'] P.S. Do not use the type name as your variable! (Do not name your dictionary dict)


3

Using numpy.savetxt I get the output I needed: with open('output_file.txt', 'a+') as outfile: for file in list_files: file_in = loadtxt(file, usecols = (1,2), comments = "#") np.savetxt(outfile, file_in, delimiter=' ', newline='\n') Not sure if it's the most pythonic way, but it works.


3

Your regex would be, Model Number:\s*([\w-]+) Python code would be, >>> import re >>> s = """ ... ... /dev/sda: ... ... ATA device, with non-removable media ... Model Number: ST500DM002-1BD142 ... Serial Number: W2AQHKME ... Firmware Revision: KC45 ... Transport: Serial, ...


3

What you can do is use the Firefox network monitor. Open a notebook an evaluate en expression. You can then see the HTTP header of the XHR request: You can also see the content of the body of the same request: As you can see, I've evaluated the expression max(3,8) There is several problems with your curl request. You didn't put the eval at the end of ...


3

Print the keys and figure it out: print data.keys() # Does it have 'hits'? If yes, do this: print data['hits'].keys() # Does it have 'hits'? If yes, do this: print data['hits']['hits'].keys() # You should have hit an error by this point


3

As explained in other answers, the issue you are having in the comparison is that you are putting double quotes around number in your if/else statements. This means you are comparing whatever number user is to the literal string "number". In essence, you are literally comparing a number to a word, which is why the statements are never true. Here is my ...


3

It's pretty ugly, but this works: def set_val(d, keys, val): reduce(lambda x,y: x[y], keys[:-1], d)[keys[-1]] = val Slightly more readable version: def set_val(d, keys, val): last = keys[-1] # Key we want to set val on search_keys = keys[:-1] # Keys we need to traverse reduce(lambda x,y: x[y], search_keys, d)[last] = val Usage: ...


3

There seem to be a lot of problems with your code. First, you don't have to declare ids in your code. Django does that automatically for you. So, categor_id and product_id are unnecessary. Second, Remove the .POST check. You aren't posting anything. Third, get_id = Category.objects.get(category_id = request.POST['category_id']) # returns a category, not ...


3

Python does not allow you to swap out characters in a string for another one; strings are immutable. What you'll need to do is create a totally different string and return that instead. dict=['A', 'a','B', 'b','C', 'c','D', 'd','E', 'e','F', 'f','G', 'g','H', 'h','I', 'i','J', 'j','K', 'k','L', 'l','M', 'm','N', 'n','P', 'o','P', 'p','Q', 'q','R', 'r','S', ...


3

You are trying to use the Python 3 version of the open() function, on Python 2. Between the major versions, I/O support was overhauled, supporting better encoding and decoding. You can get the same new version in Python 2 as io.open() instead. I'd use the shutil.copyfileobj() function to do the copying, so you don't have to read the whole file into memory: ...


3

The problem is that your break statement was executed on the first iteration. The i variable is indeed less than 10 - so the loop terminates. What you would need to do is something like this: i = 1 while True: w = open("POSCAR_%d" % i, "w") w.close() i += 1 if i == 10: break Don't forget to close the file object once you have ...


3

Instead of reinventing the wheel, use the csv module to do the reading: with open("testausnzl.csv", 'rb') as f: ausnzl_list = list(csv.reader(f)) This will remove the newline characters and produce rows (split on commas). Instead of a temporary filename, you could use have Python read from the command directly: import csv import subprocess process ...


3

It is much more pythonic (and all around better) to use a for loop: for idx in range(1,11): f = open("POSCAR_%d" % idx, "w") f.close() You can also use the format() method, which is now officially preferred, although the % operator is still much more common in the wild.


3

Arbitrary comparison ordering was removed from Python 3, see Ordering Comparisons in the What's New in Python 3.0 documentation. There is no meaningful natural ordering between dictionaries. Python 2 only pretended there was to play nice with sorting mixed lists, but this only led to enormous confusion. Take comparing strings with integers for example; ...


3

I think you don't see this often because it's really hard to read, but ... sys.ps1 = type('PS1', (object,), {'__repr__': lambda self: datetime.datetime.now().strftime('%H:%M:%S')})() would do the trick here... I use type to dynmically create a class (the arguments are name, base classes, class dictionary). The class dictionary just consists of a single ...



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