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23

Ok, this is what's happening. When your text isn't "done", you've programmed it so that you immediately call the function again (i.e, recursively call it). Notice how you've actually set it to append an item to the list AFTER you do the getting_text(raw_input("Enter the text or write done to finish entering ")) line. So basically, when you add your ...


10

Looks like you just want to sort L1 and L2 according to the index where the value falls in L. L = [1, 2, 5, 8, 3] L1 = [5, 3, 1] L2 = [8, 1, 5] L1.sort(key = lambda x: L.index(x)) L2.sort(key = lambda x: L.index(x))


8

Like this? Just do a list-comprehension to get all the indices of all the words. In [77]: sentence = "ASK NOT WHAT YOUR COUNTRY CAN DO FOR YOU ASK WHAT YOU CAN DO FOR YOUR COUNTRY" In [78]: words = sentence.split() In [79]: [words.index(s)+1 for s in words] Out[79]: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1, 3, 9, 6, 7, 8, 4, 5]


8

You could use the following dict comprehension: with open(number_file) as fileobj: result = {row[0]: row[1:] for line in fileobj for row in (line.split(),)} where the for row in (one_element_tuple,) is effectively an assignment. Or you could use a nested generator expression to handle the splitting of each line: with open(number_file) as fileobj: ...


6

Split your string into words. There are different ways of doing this, depending on requirements. Here's one way: words = re.findall('\w+', string) Count the frequency of the words: word_counts = collections.Counter(words) Get all the words that appear more than once: result = [word for word in word_counts if word_counts[word] > 1]


6

Do you mean something like this? t = (4, 5, 6, 7, 8) for i, _ in enumerate(t, 1): print(t[i:]) # (5, 6, 7, 8) # (6, 7, 8) # (7, 8) # (8,) # () If you want to join them all into an output tuple, the following 1-liner will do it inefficiently: >>> sum((t[i:] for i, _ in enumerate(t, 1)), ()) (5, 6, 7, 8, 6, 7, 8, 7, 8, 8) A more efficient way ...


6

That's easy, just define a dictionary which maps characters to their replacement. >>> replacers = {'A':'Z', 'T':'U', 'H':'F'} >>> inp = raw_input() A T H X >>> ''.join(replacers.get(c, c) for c in inp) 'Z U F X' I don't know where exactly you want to go and whether case-sensitivity matters, or if there's a more general rule to ...


4

You are having a recursion in your script. The script steps into getting_text before appending to the list. So the append is done when the recursion function returns finally. This way you are walking the stack downwards on the return path executing the append() call waiting for execution in reverse order. Maybe it is easier to unterstand like this: ...


4

You can use a generator function like following: def func(): list_of_keys = ['S_Length','S_Width','P_Length','P_Width','Predicate'] with open('example.txt') as f: for line in f: yield dict(zip(list_of_keys,line.strip().split(','))) print(list(func())) [{'P_Width': '0.2', 'S_Length': '2.1', 'Predicate': 'Iris', 'S_Width': '3.5', ...


4

If the number being < 10000 is all you know, you have to try all numbers between 1 and 9999 (inclusive). The binary search algorithm as suggested in the comments does not help since a miss does not tell you if you are too high or too low. for i in range(1, 10000): if i == number_you_are_looking_for: print("found it") break


4

import numpy as np a=np.array([[78, 17, 53, 28], [22, 75, 31, 67], [15, 94, 03, 80], [04, 62, 16, 14]]) [np.diag(a[-1:-a.shape[0]-1:-1,:], i).tolist() for i in range(-a.shape[0]+1,a.shape[0])] outputs [[78], [22, 17], [15, 75, 53], [4, 94, 31, 28], [62, 3, 67], [16, 80], [14]] as requested it works very fast for 1000x1000 matrix as well


4

Here's an idea: >>> def keyfun(word, wordorder): ... try: ... return wordorder.index(word) ... except ValueError: ... return len(wordorder) ... >>> sorted(list1, key=lambda x: keyfun(x.split('-')[1], list2)) ['Title1-Bananas', 'Title1-Oranges', 'Title1-Pear', 'Title1-Apples'] To make it neater and more efficient ...


4

sys.argv is simply a list of the commandline arguments. argparse is a full featured commandline parser which generally parses sys.argv and gives you back the data in a much easier to use fashion. If you're doing anything more complicated than a script that accepts a few required positional arguments, you'll want to use a parser. Depending on your python ...


4

Instead of calling lift() on the canvas, you need to call it on the widget instance directly: def click_on_canvas(self, event): print("lifting", self.button1) self.button1.lift() self.button2.lower() # Not necessary to both lift and lower This is only true for widgets displayed via a window on your canvas. If you were to draw objects such ...


4

If users is a list of users and you check if i in user, then you are not checking User.__contains__. You are checking list.__contains__. Whatever you do in User.__contains__ is not going to affect the result of checking if i is in a list. If you want to check if i matches any User in users, you could do: if any(i in u for u in users) Or a bit more ...


4

* is a size placeholder. It tells the formatting operation to take the next value from the right-hand-side tuple and use that as the precision instead. In your example, the 'next' value is 5 for the first slot, so you could read this as %.5g, which is used to format 2.23523523. The second slot uses 3 for the width, so becomes %.3g to format 12.353262. See ...


4

You could use the getProfile-method, and for that you need one of the following scopes: https://mail.google.com/ https://www.googleapis.com/auth/gmail.modify https://www.googleapis.com/auth/gmail.compose https://www.googleapis.com/auth/gmail.readonly Then you can just get the email address: Request GET ...


4

You can use the builtin locals() function: PICKLE_FILENAME_INSTRUCTION_IDS = 'pickled_instruction_ids.txt' def compare_instruction_id_list_with_baseline(baselineidspicklefile): baseline_ids = load_pickled_ids(baselineidspicklefile) current_main_url_content = get_page_content(main_url_test) root = lh.fromstring(current_main_url_content) ...


4

is this a pattern I should be using? In this particular case, I do think your pattern is not idiomatic, and potentially confusing to the reader of your code. The builtin print (since this is a Python-3x question) already has a file keyword argument which will do exactly what redirect_stdout does in your example: with open('myfile.txt', 'w') as myfile: ...


4

Use list comprehension: l1 = [i for i in l1 if i <= 8] l1 = l1 + [8] (or l1.append(8)) and: l2 = [i for i in l2 if i >= 8] l2 = [8] + l2 (or l2.insert(0, 8) which is presumably faster)


4

Welcome to Sack Overflow! ^^ Well, calculating something ** 100 is some serious thing. But notice how, when you declare your array J, you are forcing your function to calculate x, x^2, x^3, x^4, ... (and so on) independently. Let us take for example this function (which is what you are using): def powervector(x, n): return x ** np.arange(0, n) And ...


3

If you only need the number of books for a certain subject, there is count Subject.objects.get(id=2).book_set.count() If you need the subjects with a count for the number of books for them you can annotate from django.db.models import Count subjects = Subject.objects.annotate(num_books=Count('book')) for subj in subjects: print subj.num_books


3

You can use pivot with df1, set_index with df2 and then concat them together. Last you can remove columns name and reset_index: print df1.pivot(index='date', columns='type', values='sum') type x1 x2 x3 date 2012-01-01 12 10 8 2012-02-01 13 12 55 2012-03-01 11 10 8 print df2.set_index('date') total date ...


3

Your recursive function getting_text calls itself before adding entered_text to the list. So the effect of inner calls precedes the effect of outer calls. If you swap around getting_text(raw_input("Enter the text or write done to finish entering ")) user_input.append(entered_text) to user_input.append(entered_text) getting_text(raw_input("Enter the text ...


3

Split using re.split: import re d = """ ---------- Begin Simulation Statistics ---------- sim_seconds 9.553482 # Number of seconds simulated sim_ticks 9553481748000 # Number of ticks simulated final_tick 9553481748000 ...


3

There is no infinity in computers world. You can get largest positive integer supported by your machine using sys.maxsize (sys.maxint in python 2) and pass it to random.randint function: >>> import sys >>> sys.maxsize 9223372036854775807 >>> random.randint(0,sys.maxsize) 7512061515276834201 And for generating multiple random ...


3

Sounds like a job for itertools: from itertools import combinations def compositions(s,k): n = len(s) for c in combinations(range(1,n),k-1): yield [s[i:j] for i,j in zip((0,)+c,c+(n,))] The way it works is that the combinations part yields tuples which consist of possible cut points. For example (with s = "foobar" and k = 3) (2,4) is one ...


3

You can use the sort() method on a list to sort it in place. For your example: for sub_list in my_list: sub_list.sort(key=lambda entry: entry[1]) or equivalently, but slightly faster for sub_list in my_list: sub_list.sort(key=operator.itemgetter(1))


3

This is a misuse of __contains__. You would expect to implement __contains__ on a class like UserList. A better way to do this is to just access the id attribute directly in generator expression or list comprehension (rather than using the in operator). eg. class User(object): def __init__(self, id=None, name=None): self.id = id ...


3

The run method on the tf.Session class is quite close to theano.function. Its fetches and feed_dict arguments are moral equivalents of outputs and givens.



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