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10

Answering both parts with zip and all all(i < j for (i, j) in zip(a, b)) zip will pair the values from the beginning of a with values from beginning of b; the iteration ends when the shorter iterable has run out. all returns True if and only if all items in a given are true in boolean context. Also, when any item fails, False will be returned early. ...


7

It depends. Are x and y part of the state of myclass() or are they something external interacting with the class? If x and y are not part of the state of the myclass() instance, they should not be stored in attributes. They would be passed in as arguments instead. Lets say you have a car object, and you need to know what would happen to the car if it ...


5

Python strings interpret backslashes as escape codes; \b is a backspace character. Either double the backslash or use a raw string literal: re.sub("\\bhello\\b", '<>', inputstring) or re.sub(r"\bhello\b", '<>', inputstring) Compare: >>> print "\bhello\b" hello >>> print r"\bhello\b" \bhello\b >>> ...


5

Your inequalities are incorrect. Currently, the condition for U is if score is smaller than 0 and smaller than 39 It should be if score is greater than 0 and smaller than 39 so if int(0) <= score <= int(39) However, you can simplify all of your code a considerable amount, as others have pointed out. You can remote the double-sided ...


4

As a variant, fast and short from operator import lt from itertools import starmap, izip all(starmap(lt, izip(a, b)))


4

You can use np.isclose in combination with np.argwhere to obtain the indices of points which are close to each other (optionally specifiying a tolerance using atol or rtol): import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = np.arange(0, 1000) f = np.arange(0, 1000) g = np.sin(np.arange(0, 10, 0.01)) * 1000 plt.plot(x, f, '-') plt.plot(x, g, '-') idx = ...


4

The better way would be to do this: import sys def func(): do_actual_processing() if not successful: raise Exception("Yadayada") if __name__ == '__main__' try: func() except Exception as e: sys.exit(1) That is, the function itself does not need to be concerned with whether or not it is run from command line.


4

list1 = [48, 39, 23, 15, 11, 12, 5, 9, 7, 3, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0] list2 = [137, 30, 12, 3, 1, 0, 0, 0] def pop_zeros(items): while items[-1] == 0: items.pop() pop_zeros(list1) pop_zeros(list2) print(list1) print(list2) Output [48, 39, 23, 15, 11, 12, 5, 9, 7, 3, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1] [137, 30, 12, 3, 1]


4

The problem isn't with your writing of the maze to the file, but in its construction. In particular, you return from make_maze after glueing together only a single pair from hor, ver here: for (a, b) in zip(hor, ver): return ''.join(a + ['\n'] + b) I'm guessing you want to do something more like: the_map = [] for (a, b) in zip(hor, ver): ...


3

You have to make it a raw string as python interprets \b and <> differently >>> s = "hello hello hello 123" >>> import re >>> re.sub(r"\bhello\b",r'<>',s) '<> <> <> 123'* Note - Never name your string as str as it over-rides the built in functionality


3

By providing vals to both exec functions, you have provided the common namespace. The second argument to exec is a dictionary to use for global references in any code that is executed. When the first statement is executed it creates fun and stores it in the global namespace (vals). Thus, when when main tries to find fun, it finds that it is not a local ...


3

def generate_username(first_name,last_name): val = "{0}{1}".format(first_name[0],last_name).lower() x=0 while True: if x == 0 and User.objects.filter(username=val).count() == 0: return val else: new_val = "{0}{1}".format(val,x) if User.objects.filter(username=new_val).count() == 0: ...


3

If you want to read a file twice, you have to seek back to the beginning. InFile.seek(0)


3

You can use hexlify to convert a bytes (Python 3) / binary str (Python 2) into a hex string (the string will be bytes on Python 3, so we need .decode('ascii') there to match against the hexdigest that is a str). from binascii import hexlify hex_string = hexlify(raw.read(16)).decode('ascii') if md5.hexdigest() == hex_string: ... Likewise you can ...


3

To get the output of a command, use subprocess.check_output. It raises an error if the command fails, so surround it in a try block. import subprocess try: response = subprocess.check_output( ['ping', '-c', '3', '10.10.0.100'], stderr=subprocess.STDOUT, # get all output universal_newlines=True # return string not bytes ) ...


3

The parenthesis you are using tells findall() to match the pattern and give you back only the contents of the parenthesis. Using ?: you are matching the pattern as previously, but instead you get the whole match. re.findall("void (?:D|S)TC_.+\(\)", testCaseFile)


3

You're almost there... use list.index to find the value, then reverse a slice from your list, eg: a = ['apple', 'peach', 'orange', 'melon', 'banana'] b = a[a.index('orange')::-1] # ['orange', 'peach', 'apple'] You'd probably want to throw in a bit of error handling for where the value isn't found in the list, eg: try: b = ...


3

You are not returning: return binSearch(arr, i, lower, idx) You also need to return in your conditions: def binSearch(arr, i, lower=0, upper=None): if upper is None: upper = len(arr)+1 idx = (lower+upper)//2 if arr[idx] == i: print(idx, arr[idx],'\n') return idx # return 3/idx elif arr[idx] != i and ...


3

>>> a = np.arange(12) >>> b = [3,5,6] >>> a[~np.in1d(np.arange(len(a)), b)] = -1 >>> a array([-1, -1, -1, 3, -1, 5, 6, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1])


3

enumerate out of the box won't wrap over the index if it exceeds the length of the iterable even though you start with an offset. Saying that it is trivial enough to extend the wrap over feature by a simple wrapper for index, elem in ((index % len(lst), elem) for index, elem in enumerate(lst,2)): print (index, elem) (2, 'A') (3, 'B') (0, 'C') (1, 'D') ...


3

Well if the object is to create a range of values that are either the same as their index or -1 then it might be simpler to start with all -1 and add the data you want rather than the other way around. >>> a = np.full(12, -1, dtype=int) >>> b = [3, 5, 6] >>> a[b] = b >>> a array([-1, -1, -1, 3, -1, 5, 6, -1, -1, -1, ...


3

After loading you can call equals on the id column: df['id'].equals(df1['id']) This will return True of False if they are exactly the same, in length and same values in the same order In [3]: df = pd.DataFrame({'id':np.arange(10)}) df1 = pd.DataFrame({'id':np.arange(10)}) df.id.equals(df1.id) Out[3]: True In [7]: df = ...


3

I think you want to 'vectorize', to use numpy terminology, not parallelize in the multiprocess way. Your calculation is essentially a dot (matrix) product. Apply the mask once to the whole array to get a 2d array, NIJ. Its shape will be (N,5), where N is the number of True values in ~mask. Then it's just a (5,N) array 'dotted' with a (N,5) - ie. sum over ...


3

Use the bisect function with a pair of lists. import bisect a_values = [0, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0] b_values = [30, 25, 20, 15, 10] b = b_values[bisect.bisect_left(a_values, a)-1]


3

import requests results = requests.get("https://www.kimonolabs.com/api/ano64pm6?apikey=9ummN7C6KMHu9aErm49ixoy2ZySmaKCm").json() print([x["price"] for x in results["results"]["collection1"]]) ['£\xa03.47', '£\xa05.20', '£\xa06.92', '£\xa08.63', '£\xa010.34', '£\xa012.04', '£\xa013.73', '£\xa015.42', '£\xa017.09', '£\xa025.59', '£\xa034.05', '£\xa042.48', ...


3

Python does not support binary128s natively, hence you won't find support for them in the standard library. You will need to use NumPy (specifically numpy.frombuffer()) to convert from bytes to a binary128. f128 = numpy.frombuffer(file.read(16), dtype=numpy.float128)


3

The most efficient way if to use reversed and delete, pop is usually used when you want to use the element you pop off: def remove_zeros(l): for ele in reversed(l): if not ele: del l[-1] else: break Some timings: In [15]: %%timeit li = [48, 39, 23, 15, 11, 12, 5, 9, 7, 3, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0] + ...


3

Python runs each call in the order it encounters the instruction to call it. So, starting at the top of fac with n=6, it will get to this line: x=fac(n-1)+fac(n-2)+fac(n-3) The first thing it will do is to calculate n-1=5, and run fac(5) - which starts again at the top of the function. It will reach the same place and call fac(4), which will call fac(3) - ...


3

Try this: maskA = data(:,3) == 1; A = data( maskA, [1 2]); B = data(~maskA, [1 2]); What we are doing here is: Creating a N-by-1 logical vector which is true for all of the A rows. Defining A as all of the maskA rows, and columns [1 2] Defining B as all of the NOT maskA rows, and columns [1 2]


3

The command lambda does not take any arguments at all; furthermore there is no evt that you can catch. A lambda can refer to variables outside it; this is called a closure. Thus your button code should be: bouton1 = Button(main_window, text="Enter", command = lambda: get(Current_Weight, entree1)) And your get should say: def get(loot, entree): ...



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