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7

Another solution is to use str.ljust [i.ljust(4) for i in strs]


7

But when I do use the tag, it includes too much. * is a greedy operator meaning it will match as much as it can and still allow the remainder of the regular expression to match. You need to follow the * operator with ? for a non-greedy match which means "zero or more — preferably as few as possible". re.findall('<!--(.*?)-->', webpage, ...


7

A simpler way: new_list = [elm + str(i) for i, elm in enumerate(my_list)]


6

ar += [11] is not just an assignment. It's a method call (the method called is: __iadd__). when Python executes that line it calls the method and then assigns ar to the result. The __iadd__ method of list modifies the current list. ar = [11] is an assignment and hence it simply changes the value of the local name ar. But there is no link between the ar name ...


6

Split the lines, strip each, then re-join: s = text_file.read() s = '\n'.join([line.strip() for line in s.splitlines()]) This uses the str.splitlines() method, together with the str.join() method to put the lines together again with newlines in between. Better still, read the file line by line, process and write out in one go; that way you need far less ...


5

You almost certainly have a string with a space variant in it, not the bog-standard U+0020 SPACE but more likely U+00A0 NO-BREAK SPACE. The two characters look exactly the same when printed: >>> 'MavNandi\xa07' 'MavNandi\xa07' >>> print('MavNandi\xa07') MavNandi 7 There may be others; the Unicode stardard defines 17 space separators for ...


5

numbers = ["1", "2", "3"] letters = ["X", "Y", "Z"] from random import sample, shuffle samp = sample(letters,2)+sample(numbers*3,8) shuffle(samp) print("".join(samp)) 113332X2Z2 Or use choice and range: from random import sample, shuffle,choice samp = sample(letters,2)+[choice(numbers) for _ in range(8)] shuffle(samp) print("".join(samp)) 1212ZX1131 ...


5

You have to make the difference between the object and the name of the object. Lists in Python are mutable objects, so they can be changed whenever you have a reference to it. Names are just references to objects. Remember that technically in Python there are not variable, just names and objects, and objects are bound to names. So, with that in mind, let's ...


5

AFAIK #2 does not work (transactionally), you need to load (and put) the objects inside the transaction.


5

Why does everyone always think they need lambda functions!? You don't. >>> fwn = [max, min] >>> fwn[0](1,2) 2 >>> fwn[1](1, 2) 1


5

This behaviour has been fixed in python 3. When you use a list comprehension [i(0) + i(1) for a in alist] you will define a in global scope which is accessible for i. In a new session list(i(0) + i(1) for a in alist) will throw error. >>> i = lambda x: a[x] >>> alist = [(1, 2), (3, 4)] >>> list(i(0) + i(1) for a in alist) ...


5

You should make a a parameter to your lambda function. This works as expected: In [10]: alist = [(1, 2), (3, 4)] In [11]: i = lambda a, x: a[x] In [12]: [i(a, 0) + i(a, 1) for a in alist] Out[12]: [3, 7] In [13]: list(i(a, 0) + i(a, 1) for a in alist) Out[13]: [3, 7] An alternative way to get the same result would be: In [14]: [sum(a) for a in alist] ...


4

itertools.product() can generate all combinations for you: import itertools list_1 = [1,5,4] list_2 = [2,3,4] # using list comprehensions comparisons = [a == b for (a, b) in itertools.product(list_1, list_2)] sums = [a + b for (a, b) in itertools.product(list_1, list_2)] # using map and lambda comparisons = map(lambda (a, b): a == b, ...


4

It's __missing__ that's causing the problem, and note that: There's no point defining __init__ if it only calls the superclass; and You aren't using super when you actually set the item. A working implementation: class CheckingDict(defaultdict): def __setitem__(self, key, value): if key in self: raise ValueError("Key {!r} is ...


4

You can use a Counter from collections import Counter a = [(1,2),(1,4),(1,2),(6,7),(2,9)] counter=Counter(a) print counter This will output: Counter({(1, 2): 2, (6, 7): 1, (2, 9): 1, (1, 4): 1}) It is a dictionary like object with the item (tuples in this case) as the key and a value containing the number of times that key was seen. Your (1,2) tuple is ...


4

How about the below; import random x = int(raw_input("Enter desired number: ")) def randoTaker(): return random.randint(0, 101) for j in sorted([randoTaker() for i in range(x)]): print j


4

The problem here is your combination of operators. I take the first assignment as example and dissect it: alls[tot/2], alls[alls.index(ceo)] = alls[alls.index(ceo)], alls[tot/2] What will happen: ceo is 13 in the beginning, so alls.index(ceo) will be 3 when the statement is executed ... but wait ... this holds for the time before the assignment. First ...


4

You can pass an open file object to np.fromfile, read the dimensions of the first array, then read the array contents (again using np.fromfile), and repeat the process for additional arrays within the same file. For example: import numpy as np import os def iter_arrays(fname, array_ndim=2, dim_dtype=np.int, array_dtype=np.double): with open(fname, ...


4

Add all your imports in a single txt file, say requirements.txt and every time you run your program on a new system, just do a pip install -r requirements.txt Most Code editor's like Pycharm do this for you on the first run. You can do a pip freeze to get all the installed/required packages.


4

You are skipping multiplication by 0 in your code. Don't do that; any 13 digit number with a 0 in it is not a valid candidate as multiplication always results in 0. Simply multiply all the digits in a 13-character slice of the input string: >>> from operator import mul >>> from functools import reduce >>> st = ...


3

if that is all you want to achieve you do not need a singleton; a (static) class attribute will do the job: class MyClass(object): FLAG = 1 @shared_task def add_var(): myclass = MyClass() while(1): myclass.FLAG += 1 print( myclass.FLAG ) @shared_task def print_var(): myclass = MyClass() while(1): print( ...


3

use collections library, in the following code val_1,val_2 give you duplicates of each first elements and second elements of the tuples respectively. import collections val_1=collections.Counter([x for (x,y) in a]) val_2=collections.Counter([y for (x,y) in a]) >>> print val_1 <<< Counter({1: 3, 2: 1, 6: 1}) which is the number of ...


3

You are mixing tabs and spaces in your editor: >>> '''\ ... arrayprova = linea.split() ... description = description + "host " + arrayprova[0] + "is " + arrayprova[1] ... ''' ' arrayprova = linea.split()\n\t\tdescription = description + "host " + arrayprova[0] + "is " + arrayprova[1] \n' >>> # ^^^ spaces ...


3

The second derivatives are given by the Hessian matrix. Here is a Python implementation for ND arrays, that consists in applying the np.gradient twice and storing the output appropriately, import numpy as np def hessian(x): """ Calculate the hessian matrix with finite differences Parameters: - x : ndarray Returns: an array of ...


3

To get all the permutations of elements with a list comprehension: [a == b for a in list_1 for b in list_2] Functionality is the same as the nested for loops: list_3 = [] for a in list_1: for b in list_2: list_3.append(a == b) # Or a + b, etc. Functional implementation is a bit more confusing: list_3 = map(lambda x: map(lambda y: y == x, ...


3

For python 3.x - Yes you can do this with map function and itertools.product function and lambda expression - >>> lst1 = [1,5,4] >>> lst2 = [2,3,4] >>> lst3 = list(map(lambda x: x[0] == x[1] , itertools.product(lst1,lst2))) >>> lst3 [False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, True] For Python 2.x you can ...


3

If you're passing the data to JavaScript, you can do this trivially with the json (JavaScript Object Notation) module: >>> import json >>> json.dumps(((1420455415000L, 2L), (1420545729000L, 3L), (1420653453000L, 2L))) '[[1420455415000, 2], [1420545729000, 3], [1420653453000, 2]]'


3

As the exception says, it seems you have a syntax error in the predicate, there shouldn't be a space between the tag name and the value: xml_string = """ <data> <user> <name>123</name> </user> <user> <name>456</name> </user> </data> """ import xml.etree.ElementTree ...


3

From Python 2.7 onwards , you can check out - subprocess.check_output It returns the output of the executed command back as a byte string. Example - >>> import subprocess >>> s = subprocess.check_output(["echo","Hello World!"], shell=True) >>> s b'"Hello World!"\r\n' I had to use shell=True on my windows for this to work, but ...



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