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7

You have \ backslash escapes in your string, one each on the last two lines as well as on the first line spelling over, all three part of the letter R. These signal to Python that you wanted to ignore the newline right after it. Either use a space right after each \ backslash at the end of a line, double the backslashes to escape the escape, or use a raw ...


5

A list comprehension starts with an expression, and assignment (as you're trying to do) in Python is a statement, not an expression -- which explains the syntax-error part of your problem. (There are other syntax errors, such as that for x not followed by an in, so Python might be diagnosing any one of them, in fact). Since you want to assign, use a plain ...


5

\xe9 is an e with an acute accent in latin-1, AKA ISO-8859-1, not in utf-8. Therefore, trying utf-8, as both answers suggest, would still be broken. Therefore, what you need is rather apiitem.name.decode('latin-1') (or equivalent codec name) to get the Unicode string, then you can, if you wish, encode it again in utf-8 or whatever other codec. Added: ...


5

Python interns the strings so they're the same object (and thus the same when compared with is). This means Python only stores one copy of the same string object (behind the scenes). The result of copy.deepcopy(a) is not truly a new object and as such it isn't meaningful to perform this call on a string object.


4

Simeon's answer is perfectly correct, but I wanted to provide a more general perspective. The copy module is primarily intended for use with mutable objects. The idea is to make a copy of an object so you can modify it without affecting the original. Since there's no point in making copies of immutable objects, the module declines to do so. Strings are ...


4

You could use a regular expression: import re from itertools import islice pattern = re.compile(r'textA|textB|textC|textD') with open('file.html', 'r') as lines: for line in islice(lines, 18, 19): line = pattern.sub('', line) where I kept pattern deliberately verbose; presumably your real replacements don't all start with text; otherwise you ...


4

Your indent is out of order import csv with open('test.csv', 'rb') as csvfile: x = csv.reader(csvfile,delimiter=',',quotechar='|') for row in x: print (row) Is the correct indent The line, with open('test.csv', 'rb') as csvfile: creates a file object, but calls the __close__ method of the file once its block ends. As in Python, an ...


4

You can do this with this code: def generate_matrix(size): """Generate lists which form an eye matrix""" for i in range(size): # First, we create a new list with size 0s. l = [0] * size # At the specified position, we place a 1. l[i] = 1 # We yield this new list. yield l It forms a generator which ...


4

for comparasion you need to use ==: if question==add: #you dont need bracket here # do your stuff sum is built-in sum function dont use it for variable name


4

The % operator is the string formatting or interpolation operator and does not return the remainder in Python when used with strings. It will try to return a formatted string instead. I'm not sure what your input is, but try converting it using int so you can get the remainder of it. Edit: I see your input now, not sure why I missed it. Here's one method ...


4

You can build a custom generator function which will work on any iterable, not just lists - although for your example, list.index, exception handling and slicing is fine... def takewhile_including(iterable, value): for it in iterable: yield it if it == value: return l1 = ['apple', 'pear', 'grapes', 'banana'] print('Until ...


4

when you import something, you are doing the equivalent of copying and pasting a class onto the top of your file. inside that package, anything can be done that can be done in your normal python file, hence a print statement.


4

>>> l = [1,2,3,1,1] >>> [index for index, value in enumerate(l) if value == 1] [0, 3, 4]


3

You simply did it backwards. You want dict(zip(d, list)) (although don't use list as a variable name); you want (key, value) tuples. In [67]: d = ['E', 'T', 'A', 'O', 'I', 'N', 'S', 'H', 'R', 'D', 'L', 'C', 'U', 'M', 'W', 'F','G', 'Y', 'P', 'B', 'V', 'K', 'J', 'X', 'Q', 'Z'] In [68]: d2 = ['Q', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'G', 'A', 'T', 'R', 'H', 'S', 'N', 'O', 'X', ...


3

You don't need nested loop in this case, thanks to the in operator: for c in local: if c in valChar: performvalidaction(c) else: denoteasinvalid(c) What identifier to use (c, ch, or anything else) is pretty indifferent, I tend to use single-character identifiers for loop variables, but there's no rule saying that you must. If you ...


3

For me the following code works. Please check if you do same: import urllib, io from Tkinter import * from PIL import Image, ImageTk root = Tk() fd = urllib.urlopen("http://www.google.com/images/srpr/logo11w.png") imgFile = io.BytesIO(fd.read()) im = ImageTk.PhotoImage(Image.open(imgFile)) # <-- here image = Label(root, image = im) image.grid(row = ...


3

This should do it max_chars = max(len(item) for lst in data for item in lst)


3

Python has a wav module. You can use it to open a wav file for reading and use the `getframes(1)' command to walk through the file frame by frame. import wave w = wave.open('beeps.wav', 'r') for i in range(): frame = w.readframes(1) The frame returned will be a byte string with hex values in it. If the file is stereo the result will look something like ...


3

I came up with several different ways: Iterate the first number not in set I didn't want to get the shortest code (which might be the set-difference trickery) but something that could have a good running time. This might be one of the best proposed here, my tests show that it might be substantially faster - especially if the hole is in the beginning - ...


3

>>> s = 'hello, today!' >>> n = 3 >>> [s[i::n] for i in range(n)] ['hl d!', 'eota', 'l,oy']


3

Maybe I am not understanding you question right, but are you trying to add all the values from each of the dictionaries together into one final dictionary? If so: dict1 = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3} dict2 = {'b': 5, 'c': 1, 'd': 9} dict3 = {'d': 1, 'e': 7} def add_dict(to_dict, from_dict): for key, value in from_dict.iteritems(): to_dict[key] = ...


3

I'm pretty sure you mean the desired output is not the set d = {1,{'a','c'},2,{'b','c'}} but rather the dictionary d = {1:{'a','c'}, 2:{'b','c'}} Just double checking here:-). Anyway, I'd do it: import collections def invert_dict(d): result = collections.defaultdict(set) for k in d: result[d[k]].add(k) return dict(result) The ...


3

The hints are in the Issue 3974: It seems the benefit of the original version is that it's faster, thanks to hardcoding critical methods. There is nothing unholy about using exec. Earlier versions used other approaches and they proved unnecessarily complex and had unexpected problems. It is a key feature for named tuples that they are ...


3

Use queryset's extra() method: Person.objects.extra(where=['unnaccent_string(name) LIKE %s'), params=['%joao%'])


3

l1 = ['apple', 'pear', 'grapes', 'banana'] if "pear" in l1: l2 = l1[:l1.index("pear")+1] print l2 Output: ['apple', 'pear']


3

You are uppercasing the prompt, the string value passed to input(). You need to uppercase the result, the value returned by the function: name = input("Please enter your name ").upper() Note the placement of the closing parentheses there. You could separate out the input() call from the uppercasing: name = input("Please enter your name ") name = ...


3

I would try to replace the generic_filter method with a more general and maybe better suited solution. What you are basically trying to do is a convolution with a kernel of size 3x3x1 and values 1/9: import numpy as np import scipy import scipy.misc import scipy.ndimage import scipy.signal import timeit def run_program(): my_image = ...


3

It does work in the terminal, but the Python process itself must host all threads, so it can't exit before all threads are done running. Here's a visualization: [1] [2] [4] +------+---+ \ '-+-----------------------------+ [3] [5] \ / '------- Python process ...


3

stuff is defined inside t1. You've imported t1, so you need to print t1.stuff.


3

The traceback says: File "C:\Users\MOB140003207\Desktop\tld_python\python scripts\azure\Dealing_ascii_Without_AzureTable_Complete_AzureLD_23_01_2015.py", line 391, in IfRuleTwo Flickr+'\t'+Meetup+'\t'+Tagged UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xc3 in position 42: ordinal not in range(128) What this means is that at least one of the ...



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