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32

There is some catastrophic backtracking going on that will cause an exponential amount of processing depending on how long the non-match string is. This has to do with your nested repetitions and optional comma (even though some regex engines can determine that this wouldn't be a match with attempting all of the extraneous repetition). This is solved by ...


27

You can use the unicode category if you use regex package: >>> import regex >>> regex.findall(r'\p{Sc}', '$99.99 / €77') # Python 3.x ['$', '€'] >>> regex.findall(ur'\p{Sc}', u'$99.99 / €77') # Python 2.x (NoteL unicode literal) [u'$', u'\xa2'] >>> print _[1] ¢ UPDATE Alterantive way using unicodedata.category: ...


15

First i must say that It is not a BUG , So after my long search in python source code and read functions ,this is the code of findall function in python source code ! def findall(pattern, string, flags=0): """Return a list of all non-overlapping matches in the string. If one or more groups are present in the pattern, return a list of groups; ...


12

If you want to stick with re, supply the characters from Sc manually: u"[$¢£¤¥֏؋৲৳৻૱௹฿៛\u20a0-\u20bd\ua838\ufdfc\ufe69\uff04\uffe0\uffe1\uffe5\uffe6]" will do.


11

To avoid the catastrophic backtracking I suggest r'\d+(,\d+)*/$'


9

Good question! Yes, both methods you mention will iterate the list, necessarily. Python does not use hashtables for lists because there is no restriction that the list elements are hashable. If you know about "Big O" notation, the list data structure is designed for O(1) access by looking up a known index, e.g. my_list[13]. It is O(n) for membership ...


7

itertools.product() takes a repeat keyword argument; set it to k: product(range(2), repeat=k) Demo: >>> from itertools import product >>> for k in range(2, 5): ... print list(product(range(2), repeat=k)) ... [(0, 0), (0, 1), (1, 0), (1, 1)] [(0, 0, 0), (0, 0, 1), (0, 1, 0), (0, 1, 1), (1, 0, 0), (1, 0, 1), (1, 1, 0), (1, 1, 1)] ...


6

t.join() always returns None. That's because the return value of a thread target is ignored. You'll have to collect your results by some other means, like a Queue object: from Queue import Queue results = Queue() def upload_to_s3(filepath, unique_id): # do something print s3_url # <-- Confirming that this `s3_url` variable is not None ...


6

You need: def inner_function(): x = "one" y = "two" return x, y def outer_function(): x, y = inner_function() print "X is %" % x print "Y is %" % y outer_function() self is used for instance methods in a class, but here you're just using standalone functions. Alternatively, for a class: class MyClass: def printme(self): ...


7

String objects have a internal method, str._formatter_parser() that provides that information: [fname for _, fname, _, _ in yourstring._formatter_parser() if fname] The Python 3 equivalent is: import _string [fname for _, fname, _, _ in _string.formatter_parser(yourstring) if fname] or use the string.Formatter() class to encapsulate the difference: ...


5

Python built-in sorted function has signature: sorted(iterable[, cmp[, key[, reverse]]]) and key specifies a function of one argument that is used to extract a comparison key from each list element For your case: >>> sorted(sampleObjects, key=lambda obj: obj.value1) [C, D, A, B] >>> sorted(sampleObjects, key=lambda obj: ...


5

('beet') is not a tuple, it's the same as 'beet' since tuples are created by the , - so you want ('beet',)


5

Using dict comprehension: >>> i = ['a', 'b', 'c'] >>> x = [1,2,3] >>> {key: [key, value] for key, value in zip(i, x)} {'a': ['a', 1], 'c': ['c', 3], 'b': ['b', 2]}


5

One option would be to make a TVController hold a reference to its master (I would avoid the term parent, as this often implies inheritance) MainController instance: class TVController(object): def __init__(self, name, master=None): self.TV = TV(name) self.master = master def exit(self): if self.master is not None: ...


4

Your problem lies with what you applied unicode() to; your two expressions are not equivalent. unicode("<span><b>{0}</b>{1}<span>".format(val_str, self.text)) applies unicode() to the result of: "<span><b>{0}</b>{1}<span>".format(val_str, self.text) while ...


4

Try this: import httplib from urlparse import urlparse def url_exists(url): _, host, path, _, _, _ = urlparse(url) conn = httplib.HTTPConnection(host) conn.request('HEAD', path) return conn.getresponse().status < 400


4

Like an option you can do the following: result = {} for e, d, t in zip(Events, Details, Time): result.setdefault(e, {}) result[e].setdefault(d, 0) result[e][d] += t print result >>> {0: {'Start': 4, 'End': 17}, 1: {'Start': 5, 'End': 10}} After that it's easy to produce the output you expected. UPDATE: Thanks to @abarnert: ...


3

Surely print list1[-1] is better and more pythonic because in print list1[len(list1) - 1] you call len function and it has a lower performance than first print ! see the real time of both : clearly you can see the difference ! Note that sys is The system CPU time that the program used. This includes only the kernel system calls and not any user library ...


3

You're close, all you need to do is add a * in front of the tuple (or ** in front of a dict for keyword arguments) when calling the interior function. This is called argument unpacking. def wrapper(fn, params, keyword_params): return fn(*params, **keyword_params) def myfunc(a, b, c=0): return (a + b)/c wrapper(myfunc, (2, 5), {'c': 3}) You can ...


3

When you execute a function, it doesn't automatically dump its return value into output, so in your for loop, for i in range(len(seq)): n = seq[i] remaining = seq[i+1:] print(subset_sum(itemCount, remaining, goal, goalDifference, closestPartial, partial + [n]))


3

What you're actually doing here is comparing the speeds of two different APIs and merely using two different languages to do that. Therefore, you're not comparing like for like. The Java core API and the REST API used by Python (and other languages) have different idioms, such as explicit vs implicit transactions. Additionally, network latency associated ...


3

You are using writelines() but passing in one item at a time; file.writelines() expects an iterable (something producing a sequence of 0 or more values) instead. Use file.writeline() (singular) instead, or even better, just file.write(): caving.write(item[0]) caving.write('\t') caving.write(item[1]) caving.write('\n') If you are writing a Tab-separate ...


3

This is happening because input returns you a str, not an int, which is what you're after. You can fix this by casting the str into an int as follows: a = int(input('Enter number for factorial operation: ')) Take a look at this: In [68]: a = input('Enter number for factorial operation: ') Enter number for factorial operation: 5 In [69]: a Out[69]: '5' ...


3

You don't want to do this. Create a dictionary with a key for each suffix that you would use. Then use try[557] in place of the variable try557. >>> try_ = dict((counter, counter) for counter in range(1000)) >>> print try_[557] 557 I'm using the standard technique of affixing an underscore to the otherwise reserved word "try". (I'm ...


3

Yes. This is the code: elif self.mode == READ: if offset < self.offset: # for negative seek, rewind and do positive seek self.rewind() count = offset - self.offset for i in range(count // 1024): self.read(1024) self.read(count % 1024) Alternatives are discussed here. The problem is inherent to the gzip format.


3

TLDR short version bolded. References to the Python source code are based on version 2.7.6. Python imports most extensions written in C through dynamic loading. Dynamic loading is an esoteric topic that isn't well documented but it's an absolute prerequisite. Before explaining how Python uses it, I must briefly explain what it is and why Python uses it. ...


3

It depends what work you will do for each client. Many servers don't do a lot of CPU-intensive work for each client request, in which case it's better to use an event-driven model like Python Twisted. This is especially true in Python because threading is not its strong suit. If you have a lot of CPU-intensive work to do, you should use a thread pool (not ...


3

A regex would be good here: re.sub('[^a-zA-Z0-9-_*.]', '', my_string)


3

how about this, if tuple can be the value of your dict. i= ['a', 'b', 'c'] x= [1, 2, 3] dict(zip(i,zip(i,x))) {'a': ('a', 1), 'b': ('b', 2), 'c': ('c', 3)}


3

It's a bug in IPython, caused by the syntax for expanding {var} references in ipython magics conflicting with the same syntax chosen by python devs for set literals. If you bump into this issue, a possible workaround is to escape the set literal with double curly braces: In [1]: timeit 0 in {0} # TypeError: argument of type 'int' is not iterable In ...



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