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14

One option is to use inductive graphs, which are a functional way of representing and working with arbitrary graph structures. They are provided by Haskell's fgl library. The trick with inductive graphs is that they let you pattern match on graphs. The common functional idiom for working with lists is to decompose them into a head element and the rest of ...


13

You can use itertools module to make it completely lazy, like this >>> from itertools import repeat, chain, islice >>> def trimmer(seq, size, filler=0): ... return islice(chain(seq, repeat(filler)), size) ... >>> list(trimmer([1, 2, 3], 4)) [1, 2, 3, 0] >>> list(trimmer([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 4)) [1, 2, 3, 4] Here, we ...


11

First, using time is not a good way to test code like this. But let's ignore that. When you have code that does a lot of looping and repeating very similar work each time through the loop, PyPy's JIT will do a great job. When that code does the exact same thing every time, to constant values that can be lifted out of the loop, it'll do even better. ...


11

... is a literal syntax for the Python Elipsis object: >>> ... Ellipsis It is mostly used by NumPy; see What does the Python Ellipsis object do? The code you found uses it as a sentinel; a way to detect that a no other value was specified for the clss keyword argument. Usually, you'd use None for such a value, but that would disqualify None ...


9

Your pattern matches 0 or more N characters at the end, but doesn't say anything about what comes after those N characters. You could add $ to the pattern to anchor to the end of the input string to disallow the XX: >>> import re >>> re.compile(".*PATTERN*$") <_sre.SRE_Pattern object at 0x10029fb90> >>> import re ...


9

You have to keep track of the nodes you visit. Lists are not king in the ML family, they're just one of the oligarchs. You should just use a set (tree based) to track the visited nodes. This will add a log factor compared to mutating the node state, but is so much cleaner it's not funny. If you know more about your nodes you can possibly eliminate the log ...


9

If you just want any arbitrary string for each length, in arbitrary order, the easy way to do this is to first convert to a dict mapping lengths to strings, then just read off the values: >>> {len(s): s for s in jones}.values() dict_values(['jon', 'bill', 'jamie']) If you want the first for each length, and you need to preserve the order, then ...


8

Output the text with no newline character, then flush stdout. Output a \r to make the cursor go back to the beginning of the line. Repeat until done. Don't forget to overwrite existing text. while True: sys.stdout.write('\rfoo. ') sys.stdout.flush() delay(100) sys.stdout.write('\rfoo.. ') sys.stdout.flush() delay(100) ...


8

Lots of great ways to do it. The canonical one in Python is probably to use a collections.Counter from collections import Counter c = Counter([d['name'] for d in a]) for value,count in c.items(): if count > 1: print(value) If all you need to know is whether or not something is a duplicate (not how many times it has been duplicated), you ...


7

You can easily do this by using list comprehension. xrange(0, len(crave), 3) is used to iterate from 0 to len(crave) with an interval of 3. and then we use list slicing crave[i:i+3] to extract the required data. crave=['word1','word2','word3','word4','word5','word6','word7'] ITEM = [crave[i:i+3] for i in xrange(0, len(crave), 3)] print ITEM >>> ...


6

The strings in your list were likely already unicode, so you didn't get an issue. print(row[0]+','+row[1]) Тяжелый Уборщик Обязанности,1 литр But here we are trying to add unicode to a normal string! That's why you get the UnicodeEncodeError. print("{0},{1}".format(*row)) So just change it to: print(u"{0}, {1}".format(*row))


8

Slicing using an index greater than the length of a list just returns the entire list. Multiplying a list by a negative value returns an empty list. That means the function can be written as: def trp(l, n): return l[:n] + [0]*(n-len(l)) trp([], 4) [0, 0, 0, 0] trp([1,2,3,4], 4) [1, 2, 3, 4] trp([1,2,3,4,5], 4) [1, 2, 3, 4] trp([1,2,3], 4) [1, 2, ...


6

print(type(text[i])) if text[i] != str: You print type(text[i]) (the type) but are comparing text[i] (the value) with the type. So of course you end up with results that seem to make no sense. Just compare the type with str and it will work. That being said, the recommended way to check a type is using isinstance: if isinstance(text[i], str): ...


6

i.reverse() reverses the array in place and doesn't return anything, meaning it returns None type. That way you obtain [None, None] from list comprehension and previous arrays' elements are reversed at the same time. These two shouldn't be mixed, either use a for and x.reverse(), or use reversed(x) or x[::-1] in a list comprehension.


5

You're trying to open a file located in path, but not including that path, which tries to open the file in the current working path of your Python script. For example, if you run the script from /home/user/script.py, while your torrents are in /home/user/torrents. When you do open(file, 'rb') you are doing /home/user/charlie.torrent as opposed to ...


5

You forgot a comma: urls = ( '/', 'index' # ^ '/runs', 'runs' ) Without the comma, Python concatenates the two consecutive strings, so you really registered: urls = ( '/', 'index/runs', 'runs' ) and you have no such function in your globals() dictionary. If I add in the comma your code works.


4

There is a concept in Django called formset: A formset is a layer of abstraction to work with multiple forms on the same page. It can be best compared to a data grid. The Django way would be to use Model formsets: Like regular formsets, Django provides a couple of enhanced formset classes that make it easy to work with Django models. Therefore ...


4

Assuming I understand your aim (not sure what you might want to happen in cases of duplicate elements, namely whether you want to consider them distinct or not), you could use itertools.product: import itertools def everywhere(seq, width): for locs in itertools.product(range(width), repeat=len(seq)): output = [[] for _ in range(width)] ...


4

You are using your variables in the wrong way. Here, you want to use the variable itself, not the content: text_entry = Entry(root, textvariable=v1) # remove .get(), same for the other lines And here, you want to use the content, not the variable: def command(v1, v2, v3): return v1.get() + " " + v2.get() + " " + v3.get() # add .get() Also, when ...


4

When in doubt, just check the source. Pip has a function in their downloads module to check if the name input looks like a URL. def is_url(name): """Returns true if the name looks like a URL""" if ':' not in name: return False scheme = name.split(':', 1)[0].lower() return scheme in ['http', 'https', 'file', 'ftp'] + vcs.all_schemes ...


4

A (somewhat educated) guess is that python does not perform loop unrolling on your code while MATLAB does. This means the MATLAB code is performing one large computation rather than many (!) smaller ones. This is a major reason for going with PyPy rather than CPython, as PyPy does loop unrolling. If you're using python 2.X, you should substitute range for ...


4

l1.extend([l2, [u,z]]) append can only add one element to a list. extend takes a list and adds all the elements in it to other list.


4

One way to get the ordinal number of a letter is to call the ord function on it, and compare it to the result of calling ord('a'). For example: >>> ord('s') 115 >>> ord('a') 97 >>> ord('s') - ord('a') + 1 19 Another way is to build a mapping and just reference it: >>> import string >>> ordinals = {letter: ...


4

header_complete is a single string: headers_join=",".join(str(x) for x in type) header_complete=App_ID+","+headers_join The ",".join() expression produces a string, and you then pre-pend the app ID in front of that. You then loop over that string to produce each character, printed separately, with a comma to tell print to omit the newline: for header in ...


4

Create a flag at start of outer loop as FALSE ... and then in inner loop, set it TRUE when needed to break 2 loops, there you go, now you will break the inner loop, and check the flag in outer loop, if it is true, the break out of this(outer loop) one too. while ...: flag = 0 while ...: # point where you want 2 loops to break flag = 1 ...


4

Concatenate results and ignore your index while doing so: df_stacked = pd.concat([r for r in results], ignore_index=True)


4

That first example is not the output of the code you gave. Run it again. (I am curious why the "\$" prints out for me in the script-file example, but not the inline example.) EDIT: the first two characters of the salt -- in this case backslash and dollar-sign -- are used as the actual salt. The rest of the salt are used as the "alphabet" to use in ...


4

You can access a variable by name using locals() or globals() respectively. In your case this would work as such: locals()[values[0]](*values[1:])


4

Your code is actually working. When you print z1+z2, it's printing out the right object. And you can verify that: print (z1+z2).real, (z1+z2).imaginary The problem is that when you just print z1+z2, the way your object prints out is like this: <__main__.complex object at 0x7fa11c039790> That's not very useful. But Python can't guess what you want ...


4

Does this have to be in python? How about cleaning the file before you read it in python to start with. Use sed which will treat it line by line anyway. See removing control characters using sed. and if you pipe it out to another file you can open that. I don't know how fast it would be though. You can do it in a shell script and test it. according to ...



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