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10

var1 = int((raw_input()) has three left parentheses and two right ones. Until you complete the expression with another right parentheses, Python thinks you have not finished writing the expression. That is why it shows an ellipsis. When you type "12", the full expression becomes var1 = int((raw_input())12, which is not valid syntax because you can't have a ...


9

you can force python to print the 1 as well (and many more of the following digits): print('{:.16f}'.format(1.305195828773568)) # -> 1.3051958287735681 from https://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/floatingpoint.html: >>> 7205759403792794 * 10**30 // 2**56 100000000000000005551115123125L In versions prior to Python 2.7 and Python 3.1, Python ...


8

If you want to print the letters from left to right, you will have to zip the list of lists with itself, effectively "transposing" it. This way, the first list will have all the first rows, the second list all the second rows, and so on. Now just join those and you are done. >>> ascii = [[' _______ ', '( )', '| () () |', '| || || |', '| |(_)| ...


7

First of all: generator expressions are memory efficient, not necessarily speed efficient. Your compact genexp() version is slower for two reasons: Generator expressions are implemented using a new scope (like a new function). You are producing N new scopes for each any() test. Creating a new scope and tearing it down again is relatively expensive, ...


7

You can call MATLAB functions as well as user scripts from within Python easily. Parameter passing is also possible. Assuming you have a function with 3 parameters x,y,z. Try this: import matlab.engine eng = matlab.engine.start_matlab() x, y, z = 3, 5, 8 r = eng.compute(x, y, z)


6

found > len(string) This condition will never be true, because str.find will always return a result < len(s). The correct return value to check for when there was no result is -1. But you need to be careful with the increment, since that will change the invalid result -1 to 0 continuing the loop. So you should reorder your logic a bit: def ...


5

You can use ast.literal_eval: from ast import literal_eval with open("file.txt") as f: lst = literal_eval(f.read())


5

You are actually asking for two different things. I will try to shed light on each of the questions. Part I: Computing the BLEU score You can calculate BLEU score using the BLEU module under nltk. See here. From there you can easily compute the alignment score between the candidate and reference sentences. Part II: Computing the similarity I would not ...


5

Frankly, the easiest way to get a list of integers back out of that is to put it back together as a string representing a list: >>> list_1 = ['[1234,', '4567,', '19234,', '786222]'] >>> list_repr = ' '.join(list_1) >>> list_repr '[1234, 4567, 19234, 786222]' And then feed it through ast.literal_eval: >>> from ast ...


5

Actually, {% static %} is just for outputting a URL. If you want to load the javascript file, just do: <html> <head> <script type="text/javascript" src="{% static 'static_jquery/js/jquery.js' %}"></script> </head> </html>


4

The page refreshes itself when an item is chosen from the dropdown. You need to "refind" the select element on each option select: select = Select(driver.find_element_by_name('kategorija')) for index in range(len(select.options)): select = Select(driver.find_element_by_name('kategorija')) select.select_by_index(index) # grab the results


4

From docs : Any object can be tested for truth value, for use in an if or while condition or as operand of the Boolean operations below. The following values are considered false: None False zero of any numeric type, for example, 0, 0L, 0.0, 0j. any empty sequence, for example, '', (), []. any empty mapping, for example, {}. ...


4

You can use ast to parse python code from __future__ import print_function import ast src = """def foo(): global x, y x = y = 1 y = 2 print x + y""" s = ast.parse(src) gvars = set() for i in ast.walk(s): # get globals if isinstance(i,ast.Global): for j in ast.walk(i): gvars = gvars.union(i.names) #get ...


4

You can use @Joshual Ulrich's TTR package to get a mapping of company names to tickers and perform lookups against your companynames object. Ideally, your list of names would be accurate / properly formatted, but since it's not you will have to do a bit of extra leg work to get some of the symbols. For example, stock.symbols <- TTR::stockSymbols() ...


4

break is useful if you want to end the loop part-way through. while True: print('Please type your name.') name = input() if name == 'Mahmoud': break print('Please try again') print('Thank you!') If you do this with while name != 'Mahmoud':, it will print Please try again at the end, even though you typed Mahmoud. while True: ...


4

Dicts are not ordered. You may want to use OrderedDict: https://pymotw.com/2/collections/ordereddict.html


4

Think of a Series as behaving more like an ordered dictionary than a list with this extra index. Iteration and membership testing in a dictionary is over the keys, not the values: x in somedict is x in somedict.keys() not x in somedict.values(). >>> mydf["Campaign"] 0 Campaign X 1 Campaign Y 2 Campaign X 3 Campaign Z2 Name: ...


4

You're exhausting the file on the first iteration of the outer loop. You should probably read the list.txt file into a list, then loop over that list. You also probably want to strip the newlines off of the lines before using them. users_filepath = 'users.txt' passwords_filepath = 'list.txt' with open(users_filepath, 'r') as users_file: users = ...


4

If you just fire up Python and use either of those options, the net effect is the same if the base instance of Python's file object is not changed. (In Option One, the file is only closed when file_obj goes out of scope vs at the end of the block in Option Two as you have already observed.) There can be differences with use cases with a context manager ...


4

The following lines, inspired by @likeon's answer, will give you a dictionary whose keys will be the keys of the intersecting objects in your specs, and the values an array containing the intersecting objects. intersect = { key: [o, spec2[key]] for key, o in spec1.iteritems() if key in spec2 }; Edit: If you are using ...


4

communicate returns a tuple So you can either unpack it on-the-fly (like in your first version): stdout, stderr = p.communicate() or you can get the tuple as-is (like is your modified code): stdout = p.communicate() # tuple with 'stdout' and 'stderr' I you want to drop stderr, you can write: stdout = p.communicate()[0]


4

There is a method called Context info (found under View menu) and bind to CTRL + SHIFT + Q on OSX and ALT + Q on Linux. It will flash you the current class, function, etc, parents of the current cursor position at at the top of code editor. (Basically it shows the same line if you would scroll up manually).


4

You can strip the bad characters and convert to int. >>> [int(s.strip("[],")) for s in list_1] [1234, 4567, 19234, 786222]


4

You have a circular import; mlp imports base imports mlp: # executing mlp.py File "/home/vinod/breze/breze/learn/mlp.py", line 22, in <module> from breze.learn.base import SupervisedModel # executing base.py File "/home/vinod/breze/breze/learn/base.py", line 21, in <module> # this tries to import from mlp again, but mlp isn't done yet ...


3

All objects (including types, which are instances of type) are inherently true because they represent the presence of a value of the underlying type, as opposed to None which represents the absence of a value of any type. (It's not useful for None to evaluate to true just because it is an instance of NoneType.) Some instances of certain types (empty strings ...


3

It always evaluates to I because if DNA == 'ATT' or 'ATC' or 'ATA': always evaluates to True equivalent of: if (DNA == 'ATT') or ('ATC') or ('ATA'): The truth value of 'ATC' is always True, hence the result. You could check this way: if DNA in ['ATT', 'ATC', 'ATA']: The same holds for the other if clauses. Also, note that all of this logic: ...


3

Using the expression @\s*\S\s*= and re.search() we can filter this list down: import re listB = [str for str in listA if re.search(r'@\s*\S\s*=', str) is None] print listB # ['a', 'b', 'a@ =b', 'a@=ba=b@c', 'a@b']


3

Regex searches in python can be done with the re module; specifically, re.search('@\w=', my_string) will not be None if my_string contains an @ and a = separated by a member of \w, i.e. a word character (alphanumerics and _). I've expanded this to include cases where there's whitespace too, using \s. import re listA = ['a', 'b', 'a@b=c', 'a @ b = c', 'a@ ...


3

Given: $ cat input.txt hello Try using fileinput like so: import fileinput for line in fileinput.input(): print(line) Test it: $ python3 input.py < input.txt hello Fileinput is also smart smart enough to distinguish between a file name and stdin: $ python3 input.py input.txt hello


3

Your self (the object) is the same in both __init__() as well as result_frame() , so you can set the StringVar() as an instance variable, and then in the result_frame() method, you can get the StringVar() from that instance variable. Also, I would like to suggest that you should not do root.mainloop() within the method of your class, that can cause the ...



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