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7

This is explicitly explained in the documentation: If an exception occurs in any of the clauses and is not handled, the exception is temporarily saved. The finally clause is executed. [..] If the finally clause executes a return or break statement, the saved exception is discarded


7

I know they changed the round method in python 3. So, under v2.7.3: In [85]: round(2.5) Out[85]: 3.0 In [86]: round(3.5) Out[86]: 4.0 under v3.2.3: In [32]: round(2.5) Out[32]: 2 In [33]: round(3.5) Out[33]: 4 I don't know if it helps you but I am posting it as answer since I can't comment due to my low reputation. The question is answered more ...


7

You've named your program json.py which conflicts with the built-in module json. Rename your program to my_program.py and delete json.py and json.pyc from your directory.


6

Python functions are descriptor objects, and when attributes on a class accessing them an instance causes them to be bound as methods. If you want to prevent this, use the staticmethod function to wrap the function in a different descriptor that doesn't bind to the instance: class Bar(object): func = staticmethod(my_func) def run(self): ...


5

The schedule module is exclusively using the logger called schedule. You can use the logging library to disable this logger from writing to your main logger. import logging logging.getLogger('schedule').propagate = False If you don't want schedule's logs at all, you can also disable it by settings its log level above any real log level. import logging ...


5

Use inputtype = np.dtype(inputdata[c]).type or inputtype = inputdata[c].dtype.type The .type attribute is callable, and can be used to create new instances of that dtype.


5

Anything you use as a dict key has to satisfy the invariant that bool(x == x) is True. (I would have just said x == x, but there are reasonable objects for which that isn't even a boolean.) The dict assumes that this will hold, so the routine it uses to check key equality actually checks object identity first before using ==. This preliminary check is an ...


5

You could use .apply('{:.0%}'.format): import pandas as pd df = pd.DataFrame([(168,219,185,89,112), (85,85,84,41,46)], index=['Total Listings', 'Total Sales'], columns=list(range(1,6))) df.loc['Total Sales Rate'] = ((df.loc['Total Sales']/df.loc['Total Listings']) .apply('{:.0%}'.format)) print(df) yields ...


5

You can use the NumPy built-in np.bmat that's perfectly suited for such a task, like so - np.bmat([[A, B], [B.T, C]]) As mentioned in the comments by @unutbu, please note that the output would be a NumPy matrix. If the intended output is an array instead, we need to convert it, like so - np.asarray(np.bmat([[A, B], [B.T, C]]))


5

No, they are not the same. is in Python checks if two objects have the same id in Python, ie. they are the same, even in memory. Something you can do to check is this: >>> a='foo' >>> a is 'foo' True >>> id(a) 44434088 >>> id('foo') 44434088 >>> a=[1] >>> a is [1] False >>> id(a) 45789792 >&...


4

First, change the type of the column: df.cc = pd.Categorical(df.cc) Now the data look similar but are stored categorically. To capture the category codes: df['code'] = df.cc.cat.codes Now you have: cc temp code 0 US 37.0 2 1 CA 12.0 1 2 US 35.0 2 3 AU 20.0 0 If you don't want to modify your DataFrame but simply get the ...


4

You can use reduce function where dfList is your list of data frames: import pandas as pd reduce(lambda x, y: pd.merge(x, y, on = 'Date'), dfList) As a demo: df = pd.DataFrame({'Date': [1,2,3,4], 'Value': [2,3,3,4]}) dfList = [df, df, df] dfList # [ Date Value # 0 1 2 # 1 2 3 # 2 3 3 # 3 4 4, Date Value # ...


4

You can split your string on "|", then split each part on ":", feeding the pairs into a dict: output = dict( keyvalue.split(':') for keyvalue in orig_value.split('|') ) You don't need to use any json-parsing tools for that, because the format of the string you're parsing has nothing to do with json formatting.


4

The lambda function was used with map, so the parameters for the lambda are passed from the second argument of map. Understanding how map works will help you understand better how the lambda takes its parameter: Apply function to every item of iterable and return a list of the results. If additional iterable arguments are passed, function must take ...


4

From the docs: A finally clause is always executed before leaving the try statement. @deceze quoted the more relevant part in his answer The function returns the string in the finally clause and doesn't raise the exception since it returned, and that what gets printed. If you try to execute: >>> try: ... raise Exception ... finally: ... ...


4

From a ticket that lead to the change I prefer failing early and loudly, by raising an exception when an unsaved object is assigned to a related field. I could listen to an argument for trying to re-fetch the pk from the cached related instance in save(), but that feels like action-at-a-distance: the actual problem usually happened earlier. ...


4

There shouldn't be a slash in front of the port number. Try these URLs: localhost:5000 localhost:5000/welcome


4

You can use MultiIndex.swaplevel: df.columns = df.columns.swaplevel(0,1) print (df) job carpenter mechanic plumber carpenter mechanic plumber experience experience experience type type type name Aaron NaN 12.0 NaN None owner ...


4

Use str() to convert each of the numbers to string and strptime() to load a string into a datetime object: from datetime import datetime l = [ [19480916, 19480901, 19480917, 19480901, 19480901, 19481019], [19480917, 19480916, 19481019, 19480922, 19480922, 19490902], [19481004, 19480917, 19481021, 19480924, 19481004, 19501124] ] for sublist ...


4

No, the j-th position will (or at least CAN) vary. From the docs (emphasis mine) os.listdir(path='.') Return a list containing the names of the entries in the directory given by path. The list is in arbitrary order, and does not include the special entries '.' and '..' even if they are present in the directory. That said, if you want it sorted, ...


4

The short answer to your question is that each of these three methods of reading bits of a file have different use cases. As noted above, f.read() reads the file as an individual string, and so allows relatively easy file-wide manipulations, such as a file-wide regex search or substitution. f.readline() reads a single line of the file, allowing the user to ...


4

Let's split your code... Part1: create function do_twice(f), that will run f() two times. def do_twice(f): f() f() Part2: create a function called print_spam() that will print() the word "spam" def print_spam(): print('spam') Part3: call the function print_spam() inside the do_twice() funtion do_twice(print_spam) This way, your code ...


4

You don't need regular expressions, str.translate() would be a better choice: d = { "ö": "oe", "Ö": "Oe", "ä": "ae", "Ä": "Ae", "ü": "ue", "Ü": "Ue", "ß": "ss" } s = "Ä test ß test Ü" print(s.translate({ord(k): v for k, v in d.items()})) Prints: Ae test ss test Ue


4

You can do negative isin() indexing: In [57]: df Out[57]: a b c 0 1 2 2 1 1 7 0 2 3 7 1 3 3 2 7 4 1 3 1 5 3 4 2 6 0 7 1 7 5 4 3 8 6 1 0 9 3 2 0 In [58]: my_list = [1, 7, 8] In [59]: df.ix[~df.b.isin(my_list)] Out[59]: a b c 0 1 2 2 3 3 2 7 4 1 3 1 5 3 4 2 7 5 4 3 9 3 2 0 or using query() function:...


4

you could also use np.in1d. From http://stackoverflow.com/a/38083418/2336654 For your use case: df[~np.in1d(df.b, my_list)] Demonstration from string import ascii_letters, ascii_lowercase, ascii_uppercase df = pd.DataFrame({'lower': list(ascii_lowercase), 'upper': list(ascii_uppercase)}).head(6) exclude = list(ascii_uppercase[:6:2]) print df lower ...


4

Let's say arr is the input array of categories. Forward Process/Encoding : From categories to IDs To perform the encoding, use np.unique alongwith its optional return_inverse argument to give us IDs that would have values from 0 to N-1, where N is the number of categories you would have in arr , like so - unq,idx = np.unique(arr,return_inverse=True) ...


4

if f in f.startswith("20"): is not valid. startswith returns a bool the in keyword trys to check for containment inside your bool. That only works for iterables (which bool is not). You probably want: if f.startswith("20"):


3

You named your initializer method init; the correct name is __init__. The double underscores are how Python indicates names reserved for Python "special" use. By not using the correct name, the superclass (object's) __init__ was invoked, but it takes no arguments, so you get the error. Sidenotes: You've got another error in saveData; the final print and ...


3

You need to close your server sockets after you're done with them. SO_REUSEADDR doesn't let you use the address of an open socket, only one that has been recently closed but is still lingering in the TIME_WAIT state.


3

If you're going to actually execute a return, you must return something no matter what. So you could try: return num if nums.count(num) != 2 else None However, that's not going to work in this case since it will return on the first check rather checking all the elements for what you want. In other words, let's say the first element checked is the first ...



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