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10

Listing it as a function is a bit of a simplification, yes. But remember that classes are callable* — that's how you create an instance of a class! If it helps you any, think of str(5) as constructing a string from the number 5. Note that all of the other built-in types exist the same way: int(), float(), str(), tuple(), list(), set(), file()... they're ...


9

Take the current exception (I used it as e in this case); then for a KeyError the first argument is the key that raised the exception. Therefore we can do: except KeyError as e: # One would do it as 'KeyError, e:' in Python 2. cause = e.args[0] with that, you have the offending key stored in cause.


7

You can do it as: my_str[::-1].split() Example >>> s = 'Hello World' >>> print s[::-1].split() ['dlroW'. 'olleH'] >>> s = 'this is Xing Min' >>> print s[::-1].split() ['niM', 'gniX', 'si', 'siht'] Here, the [::-1] gets the whole string in reverse order. This is the syntax [start:end:step]. When you don't specify a ...


7

They are both shared across all instances of the class, however the difference is that lists are mutable, but integers are immutable. This: a.x = a.x + 1 creates a new immutable int object* then points a.x (but not b.x) to the new object. By contrast, this: a.list.append(1) modifies the mutable list object a.list (and b.list) was already pointing to ...


6

This is because when you call: set(sorted(A)) you are sorting the original full list and then filtering out the duplicate values. However, when you call: sorted(set(A)) you are first shortening the list by removing duplicate values using set and then sorting the much smaller list hence the shorter time. Hope that makes sense. For Example >>> ...


5

When the documentation for set says it is an unordered collection, it only means that you can assume no specific order on the elements of the set. The set can choose what internal representation it uses to hold the data, and when you ask for the elements, they might come back in any order at all. The fact that they are sorted in some cases might mean that ...


5

You want: b = a[::2] # Start at first element, then every other. and: c = a[1::2] # Start at second element, then every other. So now we have what we want: >>> print(b) [0, 2, 4, 6, 8] >>> print(c) [1, 3, 5, 7, 9]


5

You need to add just the functions to the dictionary; you added their result. To support variable arguments, use either lambdas or functools.partial() to wrap your functions instead: def execute_function(function_name, arg1, arg2, arg3): return { 'func1': lambda: func1(arg1), 'func2': lambda: func2(arg1, arg3), 'func3': lambda: ...


5

To get all the content of a file, just use file.read(): all_text = fp.read() # Within your with statement. all_text is now a single string containing the data in the file. Note that this will contain newline characters, but if you are extracting things with a regex they shouldn't be a problem.


4

The division is not "wrong". It is integer division (a.k.a. floor division). When you divide two integers, the result is an integer: >>> 3/4 0 >>> 4/4 1 When you divide two floating-point numbers (numbers with a fractional part), the result is a float: >>> 3./4 0.75 >>> 4./4 1.0 Note that this "problem" is confined ...


4

This is a job for regular expressions! Given: >>> s '12345-0012-0123' We want to match two three groups: one or more (+) digits (d) followed by a - followed by one or more (+) digits (d) followed by a - then there is one or more (+) 0, which we don't capture (no ()s). Remove the + if you only want to match a single 0! one or more (+) digits ...


4

This is not necessarily a job for regular expressions! def reformat(a): x = a.split("-") x[-1] = "%03d"%int(x[-1]) return "-".join(x) example use: In [14]: reformat("12345-0012-0001") Out[14]: '12345-0012-001' So taking some other answers here: In [55]: %timeit v[:len(v)-4]+str(int(v.split('-')[2])) 100000 loops, best of 3: 1.83 us per ...


4

You could use a sign() function and index lookup: import math def sign(v): return int(math.copysign(1,v)) def set_color(x, trigger=False): if trigger: return "blue" return ('red', 'black', 'green')[sign(x)+1] That said, I'm not sure how much "better" this is. "Clever" != "better" in the usual case. EDIT Alternative which allows you to extend ...


4

You can do that using list slicing: b = a[::2] c = a[1::2] Example >>> a = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9] >>> b = a[::2] >>> c = a[1::2] >>> print b [0,2,4,6,8] >>> print c [1,3,5,7,9] The [::] syntax is as follows: [start:end:step]. If you don't specify any parameters for start and end, it will work with the ...


4

You need to move the guess inside the loop, from: guess = int(input("Please guess a number")) n=1 while n<10: if guess < number: print("Too low") elif guess > number: print("Too high") elif guess == number: print("Got it") n = n+1 to: n = 1 while n < 10: guess = int(input("Please ...


4

You need to set the subprocess up for communication: >>> from subprocess import Popen, PIPE >>> command = Popen(['date'], stdout=PIPE) >>> command.communicate() ('do apr 17 15:06:16 CEST 2014\n', None) The first part of the return value is stdout, the second is stderr.


4

You can zip() the lists and apply function defined in fs to the appropriate ds value: >>> ds = ['1','1','1','1','1'] >>> fs = [('type',str),('value',int),('hidden',bool),('length',int),('pieces',str)] >>> {key: f(value) for (key, f), value in zip(fs, ds)} {'hidden': True, 'type': '1', 'length': 1, 'value': 1, 'pieces': '1'}


4

global variables are only global in their own module, therefore load() only modifies the a variable inside aScript, not the imported a. When you do from aScript import *, python iterates over aScript's public variables and creates a copy of each in the current module, that is, it creates __main__.a equal to aScript.a. Now you call load, which is actually ...


4

. (wildcard) and ? (zero or one, quantifier) are special regex characters, you need to escape them to use them literally. However, in your case it would be much simpler to use a character class (inside which these characters aren't special anymore): split(r'[!.?] ') A character class [...] stands for "one character, any of the ones included inside the ...


4

Starting with a as [8,9,10,11]: First one would be (to string): a = ''.join('.{0}'.format(d) for d in a) # ".8.9.10.11" Second would be (back to list of ints again): a = [int(i) for i in a.split('.')[1:]] # [8, 9, 10, 11]


4

This if self.betType.upper() == 'BOX' or 'BOXED' or 'B' Does not equal if (self.betType.upper() == 'BOX') or (self.betType.upper() == 'BOXED') or (self.betType.upper() =='B') The first will evaluate three different expressions: if (self.betType.upper() == 'BOX') # either True or False if ('BOXED') # this will ALWAYS evaluate to True if ('B') # ...


3

Is it because inst.myList = before makes them both point to the same list, so when I change inst.myList, before also changes? Yes, that is exactly why. As for whether inst.method is "guaranteed" to change inst.myList, that depends what you mean. With the particular implementation you gave, yes, it is guaranteed to change it as long as it is a list, ...


3

I would use re: >>> import re >>> l = ["Tough Fox", "Nice White Cat", "This is a lazy Dog" ] >>> for i in l: ... print re.findall("[A-Z][^A-Z]*", i) ... ['Tough ', 'Fox'] ['Nice ', 'White ', 'Cat'] ['This is a lazy ', 'Dog'] Edit: Okay, I thought that was a mistake. So now I am a little late, and re.split(..., s, maxsplit=1) ...


3

If you want to split a string on each capital letter following a whitespace import re s = "Tough Fox" re.split(r"\s(?=[A-Z])", s, maxsplit=1) ['Tough', 'Fox'] The re.split method is equivalent to the Python builtin str.split, but allows a regular expression to be used as split pattern. The regex first looks for a whitespace (\s) as the split pattern. ...


3

The problem is not with how you're instantiating the lottery class. That part is fine. Rather, it looks your play method in your Lottery class is buggy. We can see this from looking at your exception: File "ILR2.py", line 38, in play if digits == '3': #attempt support for 4 and 5 digit numbers NameError: global name 'digits' is not defined Based on ...


3

The .read method reads a given number of bytes, or the entire file if no number is specified. To split by characters rather than bytes, you should read the whole file and then chunk them up yourself. Example: # This is just a convenience so you don't have to worry about closing the file with open('words.txt', 'r') as inFile: # Read the file ...


3

With python import subprocess # if the script don't need output. subprocess.call("php /path/to/your/script.php") # if you want output proc = subprocess.Popen("php /path/to/your/script.php", shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE) script_response = proc.stdout.read() With console php -r "echo 'a';" Or php "path\to\php\file"; If you are using windows, ...


3

First of all, you should be aware of Python's global interpreter lock will not allow more than one thread to run Python code at the same time (though threads can run e.g. C code, for example using native code modules if they release the GIL appropriately). If you need to make use of a multicore CPU using Python code, check out the multiprocessing module. ...


3

This is rather simple: Declare your t array, compute x(t) array, plot it with matplotlib. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # Declare t array t = np.arange(0.0,2.0,0.01) # change your end point and step as you want it # Compute x(t) with numpy x = np.cos(2*np.pi*10*t) + np.cos(2*np.pi*25*t) + np.cos(2*np.pi*50*t) + np.cos(2*np.pi*100*t) ...


3

You just need to get the first element (index 0) of each tuple, and then join them together, so: ' '.join(item[0] for item in lst) is what you want. Demo: >>> lst = [("This", 4), ("is", 2), ("a", 1), ("string", 6)] >>> new_string = ' '.join(item[0] for item in lst) >>> print(new_string) 'This is a string' Oh and by the ...



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