Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

The names of the arguments of a function are local variables, they are not available as global names. a, b and c exist only inside of the function, and receive the values you pass to the function. You need to create new variables or use literal values when calling the function: print(function(1, 2, 3)) would work because 1, 2 and 3 are actual values to ...


7

The sorting key is a function that, given a list element, returns a value that Python knows how to compare natively. For example, Python knows how to compare integers and strings. Python can also compare tuples and lists that are composed of things it knows how to compare. The way tuples and lists get compared is that earlier items in the tuple or list take ...


7

What about checking the length inside of the function? Here I just raised an error, but you could do anything. def func(array): if len(array) != 2: raise ValueError("array with length 2 was expected") # code here runs if len(array) == 2


7

You can use a generator expression within sum : >>> s='ZZAZAAZ' >>> sum(i for i,j in enumerate(s,1) if j=='A') 14


6

Because you're iterating over y starting from the bottom (largest negative number), but when you print the lines you inevitably start from the top. You also have the loops the wrong way around - you need to do each line in turn (iterate y) and do each column in turn (iterate x) within that. Switch to: for y in range(10, -11, -1): # decending rows for x ...


5

Change the line user, *scores = row to user, scores = row[0], row[1:] Note apart from the above, you should also change average = sum([int(score) for score in scores]) / len(scores) to average = sum([int(score) for score in scores]) / float(len(scores)) as division in Python 2.X is integer division. Alternatively, you can also import real ...


5

A pair of points can only be 'near' each other if their distance in at least one dimension is less than the threshold. This can be exploited to reduce the number of candidate pairs by filtering one dimension after the other. I suggest: - sort the points in one dimension (say: x) - find all points which are close enough to the next point in the sorted list ...


5

This exception is raised in list class. It is not possible to get variable name (firms) inside list methods so the exception contains a generic message .


5

This is what groupby in python does efficiently: from itertools import groupby a = ['1CDABCABDA', '1CDABCABDB', '1CDABCABDD', '1BCABCCCAA', '1DDAABBBBA', '1BCABCCCAD'] key = lambda i: a[i][:-1] indexes = sorted(range(len(a)), key=key) result = [[x, list(y)] for x, y in groupby(indexes, key=key)] Output: [['1BCABCCCA', [3, 5]], ['1CDABCABD', [0, 1, 2]], ...


5

As a more Pythonic way for such problems use collections.defaultdict : >>> from collections import defaultdict >>> d=defaultdict(list) >>> new=[i[:-1] for i in a] >>> d=defaultdict(list) >>> for i,j in enumerate(new): ... d[j].append(i) ... >>> d defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {'1CDABCABD': [0, 1, ...


5

The problem is that you are only calling the functions CPU and User but you are not assigning them to any variables. Hence you need to re-define your function game as in def game(): move = CPU(possibilities) choice = User() compare(move, choice) In this way you will be calling the function compare with a local copy of the values returned after ...


4

You don't really want to try to turn user input directly into variable names; it's possible but it's messy, brittle, and insecure. What you want to do instead is create a list or dictionary that maps the input to the chapter functions; something like: chapters = {'1': Chap1Menu, '2': Chap2Menu, #etc. } and then use it ...


4

PEP 8, a seminal style guide for Python, discourages this behavior: Compound statements (multiple statements on the same line) are generally discouraged. It is typically valid syntax to do so, as long as there is only a single line involved, but it's considered a bad practice. Avoid it.


4

Replace stuff with line. stuff is simply the filepath, the actual content is in line -- the variable used for iterating over the generator f a.append(line.rstrip('\n').split(",")) You might like to store the list formed after using split on line, as a tuple instead, such that a would be a list of tuples, where each tuple would correspond to a line in the ...


4

The problem is because the function Listbox.select_set(index) just select the item of the index you give, and the blue highlight shows which item you select. You need to use the function Listbox.activate(index) to activate the item of the index you give, and then the black border shows which item you activate. I have tried your code, and I add one line ...


4

Here you are changing the local variable each and not the elements in the list. You can access the list by using enumerate to get the indexes: for idx, each in enumerate(str1): str1[idx] = " "


4

You set clientCount to + 1 in your function. You need to use clientCount += 1 instead. You also want to increase clientCount before printing it to get the correct count. Additionally, instead of manually releasing the lock (which will fail if you encounter an exception before), use the a with block (documentation: Python2, Python3): def clientThread(conn): ...


4

Just do getattr(instance, method)(). getattr returns the method object, which you can call with () like any other callable.


4

Pool.map is useful if you need to run a particular function on all the elements of an iterable in parallel, and block until the whole iterable has been processed. In your case, you're just passing a single item in the iterable, so you're just running a single function in a subprocess, and blocking until its done. This is slower than just running the function ...


4

Not the way you have written those functions, no: they are not expecting the extra arguments so will raise a TypeError. If you define all the functions as also expecting **kwargs, things will work as you want.


4

You can create a base script, let's say command.py and check with what name this script was called (don't forget to make it executable): #!/usr/bin/python import os.path import sys def command1(*args): print 'Command1' print args def command2(*args): print 'Command2' print args commands = { 'command1': command1, 'command2': ...


4

You can use argsort to sort the indices of flattened array, followed by unravel_index to convert the flat index back to coordinates: >>> i = (-a).argsort(axis=None, kind='mergesort') >>> j = np.unravel_index(i, a.shape) >>> np.vstack(j).T array([[1, 1], [0, 2], [0, 0], [0, 1], [1, 0], [1, 2]]) ...


4

This is a very common error. I am fairly certain that you are doing: list1.append(list2) Instead, you want to do: list1.extend(list2) Here is a very useful resource However, since you want [[1,2], [3,4]] instead of [1,2,3,4], you should do: if key in d1: d1[key].append(l1) else: d1[key] = [l1]


4

Well, you could decorate the number.double method with property: class number: def __init__(self, number): self.number = number @property def double(self): return self.number * 2 print(number(42).double) # 84 If you know the type of your argument, it'd be better to inherit number from it. For example class number(int): ...


4

You are missing % sign here: print "%r favorite food is %s" % (person, fav) In your call you have: "%r favorite food is %s" (person, fav), and right after the string object there is a call sign, that's why it thinks that you tried to "call" a string as a function. You can use the format method: print "{person} favorite food is ...


4

The glob module uses the fnmatch module for individual path elements. That means the path is split into the directory name and the filename, and if the directory name contains meta characters (contains any of the characters [, * or ?) then these are expanded recursively. If you have a list of strings that are simple filenames, then just using the ...


3

You can use a non-capturing group to assert either a comma or the end of the string follows: p = re.compile(r'\((.*?)\)(?:,|$)') Working Demo


3

To write binary data you should open the file using the file mode 'wb' (write binary). i.e.: f = open(join(self.dirname, query), 'wb')


3

It appears that bitarray does not maintain the hash invariant: >>> x = bitarray(b'0000') >>> y = bitarray(b'0000') >>> x == y True >>> hash(x) == hash(y) False This is a violation of the API for __hash__, as documented: The only required property is that objects which compare equal have the same hash value This ...


3

Python has a very different execution model than JavaScript that doesn't prioritize this kind of problem. To solve it, you'll probably need to use threading: https://docs.python.org/2/library/threading.html Specifically, the Timer class is probably what you're looking for -- check out the example at the above link. Be aware, however, that Python's ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible