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8

You're right, the shell script "hangs" on the first line until the python script finishes. If it doesn't, the shell script won't continue. Therefore you have to use & at the end of the shell command to run it in the background. This way, the python script starts and the shell script continues. The kill command doesn't take a path, it takes a process id. ...


8

Use min with an appropriate key function, e.g. the abs of the difference to i (which you really shouldn't name int): i = 700 # don't shadow built-in name int values = (value1, value2, ...) # consider using a list/tuple from the beginning nearest = min(values, key=lambda v: abs(i-v)) > nearest 600


6

You don't need a regular expression for that. Just send the string to split(). >>> mystr = """ ... ... ... MA1-ETLP-01 ... MA1-ETLP-02 ... MA1-ETLP-03 ... MA1-ETLP-04 ... MA1-ETLP-05 ... ... """ >>> mystr.split() ['MA1-ETLP-01', 'MA1-ETLP-02', 'MA1-ETLP-03', 'MA1-ETLP-04', 'MA1-ETLP-05']


5

Sort a list of tuples, the first value in descending order (reverse=True) and the second value in ascending order (reverse=False, by default). Here is a MWE. lists = [(2, 'c'), (2, 'a'), (3, 'b')] result = sorted(lists, key=lambda x: (-x[0], x[1])) # -x[0] represents descending order print(result) # Output [(3, 'b'), (2, 'a'), (2, 'c')] It might be ...


5

If you're just printing out a fixed length output like this each time, you can use the carriage return character to rewind to the start of the line, as long as you don't print a newline. Example: # Note trailing comma, that suppresses the newline in Python print ("%s/%s/%s %s:%s:%s" % (now.month,now.day,now.year,now.hour,now.minute,now.second)), # Now ...


5

You are never calling the functions to get the values they are returned, thus, your code is running like: startKilometre = float(input("What is the starting kilometre?")) finalKilometre = float(input("What is the final kilomotre")) finalFuel = float(input("How much fuel did you put in the car?")) print(distanceTravelled) print(litersPerKilometre) ...


5

When the file is printnumbers.py, the module is called printnumbers (without the .py). Therefore use import printnumbers import sys sys.path.append('/home/jake/Documents') appends '/home/jake/Documents' to the end of sys.path. The directories listed in sys.path are searched (in the order listed) whenever an import statement causes Python to search for ...


4

You've introduce introduced a circular import: models module depends on managers module which in turn depends on the models module. Neither of the modules can be resolved since their dependency cannot be resolved. Try re-organizing your modules.


4

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 5, 2] a = [x for i, x in enumerate(a) if x not in a[:i]] print(a) # [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] It's often better to create a new collection rather than removing from an old one. In this case we include those elements from the original list that have not already appeared earlier.


4

Code that is not indented into a function will be run as the file is loaded (once). That's probably what you want: def some_function(): pass def other_function(): pass init_value = 0 # This code here is run immediately. buffer = None


4

Update: After going through all the zipping, summing, mapping, slicing and reversing, this solution struck me as surprisingly simple, actually: def switch(my_list): new_list = my_list[:] # make a copy not to harm the original for i in range(len(my_list)//2): # at the appropriate index ... new_list[i] += new_list.pop() # ... add the ...


4

Because the source of the code is stdin, e.g. it was typed in at a console.


4

As per the documentation the reflected form of __lt__() is __gt__(). There are no swapped-argument versions of these methods (to be used when the left argument does not support the operation but the right argument does); rather, __lt__() and __gt__() are each other’s reflection, __le__() and __ge__() are each other’s reflection, and __eq__() and __ne__() ...


4

Python isn't Java. (WebElement element = ...;) Here's a link to the documentation for the python methods etc. What you actually want is: from selenium import webdriver browser = webdriver.Firefox() browser.get("http://www.agoda.com/the-coast-resort-koh-phangan/hotel/koh-phangan-th.html") myelement = browser.find_element_by_id("next-page") Although you ...


4

I believe you are facing a scope problem, with the fact that although you are defining it as global, you haven't defined it outside the function to begin with. If you define the three variables outside any of your functions, then your program appears to work: def AISection(): global AI1, AI2, AI3 AI1 = 0 AI2 = 0 AI3 = 0 print("How many ...


4

You can fix the error by setting __abstract__ = True. I modified your example: from flask import Flask from flask_sqlalchemy import SQLAlchemy app = Flask(__name__) db = SQLAlchemy(app) class Foo(db.Model): __abstract__ = True bar = db.Column(db.String) __abstract__ is described in the documentation. Alternatively, you can use a mixin class. ...


3

In CPython the result of open(file) will have no references to it after .read() completes if there were no exceptions, so it will be instantly garbage collected which will cause it to close. But don't do this. Make a convenience function: def read_file(path): with open(path) as f: return f.read() data = read_file(path) Also don't fuss about ...


3

It will (probably, see comments) be closed when garbage collected; however the cleanest way to handle it is within a with block: with open(file, "r") as datafile: data = datafile.read() If the process is short-lived, it shouldn't cause too much trouble, but it's good practice to release the handle as soon as it becomes unnecessary.


3

This kind of thing is often done by iterating over a bunch of regular expressions and stopping when you find one that matches - because your conversion from a string to a number needs special parsing beyond the capabilities of regular expressions. That means you need to order them in a way that you know will give the right answer. In this case, you might do ...


3

You can't call ask until ask has been defined. Here, you call the begin function immediately after it has been defined: def begin(): import random import sys guessesRemaining = 3 randomNumber = random.randint(1,10) print("I am thinking of a number between 1 and 10.") ask() begin() # this calls begin immediately! Notice that within ...


3

The problem is with this line X_real_zeros = X, instead of just assign you should use: X_real_zeros = X.copy() You may refer to why should I make a copy of a data frame in pandas for more information.


3

I'm the author of the new NgramModel code in the model branch. We had to overhaul that module big time due to a lot of critical bugs in the old implementation. My changes were merged only a couple of weeks ago, the core developer team hasn't had a chance to update the documentation. That being said, I would be thrilled for you to try the new code out and ...


3

Lists have linear time lookup. That's because to find whether an item is in a list, Python needs to scan through every item until it finds a match; so the time it takes is proportional to the length of the list. The longer the list, the longer it will take. In computer science terms, this is called O(n) time complexity. Sets and dictionaries have constant ...


3

The source data is not CSV, it's json. Luckily pandas provides facilities for working with it as well. import requests from pandas.io.json import json_normalize url = 'https://poloniex.com/public?command=returnChartData&currencyPair=USDT_ETH&start=1435699200&end=9999999999&period=14400' resp = requests.get(url) data_frame = ...


3

At this moment (v1.4.0) spark-csv doesn't support partitionBy (see databricks/spark-csv#123) but if you adjust built-in sources to achieve what you want. You can try two different approaches. Assuming your data is relatively simple (no complex strings and need for character escaping) and looks more or less like this: df = sc.parallelize([ ("foo", 1, ...


3

The content is dynamically loaded, you can see the template it in what requests returns or if you look at the view source in your browser: <div class="pt10 fontlig colr4 clearfix ulinline"> <ul id="profileInfo{profileNoId}" class="fl f14 wid83p descplist"> <li class="textTru">{age}, {height}</li> <li ...


3

np.argmax(arr) by default, returns the index of the maximum value into the flattened array, arr.ravel(). To obtain the index of the maximum value of arr itself, use np.unravel_index: In [15]: np.random.seed(2016); arr = np.random.randint(10, size=(2,3)); arr Out[15]: array([[3, 7, 2], [3, 8, 4]]) In [17]: np.argmax(arr) Out[17]: 4 In [18]: ...


3

You can use np.argsort() to get the indices of your array in a sorted mode and reverse it to get the indices of decreasing mode, then use a simple indexing to get your expected output: >>> A.argsort() array([[1, 0, 2, 3], [1, 2, 0, 3], [1, 0, 2, 3]]) >>> idx=np.array([5, 2, 3, 9]) >>> indices = A.argsort()[:,::-1] ...


3

get_form_class should return the actual class, not its name: # import the form classes from wherever they live from .forms import UpdateDogForm, UpdateCatForm, UpdateFrogForm ... SOME_FORMS = { "Dog": UpdateDogForm, # <- no string values here! "Cat": UpdateCatForm, # <- "Frog": UpdateFrogForm, # <- }


3

You can do it in log n time if you keep the numbers in order and bisect i = 540 value1 = 400 value2 = 500 value6 = 600 lst = [value1, value2, value6] from bisect import bisect ind = bisect(lst, i, hi=len(lst) - 1) print(min((lst[ind], lst[ind - 1]), key=lambda x: abs(x-i)))



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