Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Assuming that there is always an underscore after the number, and that there is always exactly a single number, you can do this: s = '45_cat_fish' print s.split('_', 1)[1] # >>> cat_fish The argument to split specifies the maximum number of splits to perform.


5

Sure, itertools is always the answer for these kind of problems. There may be better alternatives but the first that comes to my mind is using itertools.product: from itertools import product [''.join(chars) for chars in product(*[[x] + d.get(x, []) for x in word])] Output ['abcde', 'ab3de', 'a2cde', 'a23de', '1bcde', '1b3de', '12cde', '123de', ...


5

You seem to be confused about the distinction between compilers and interpreters, since you refer to both in your question without a clear distinction. (Quite understandble... see all the comments flying around this thread :-)) Compilers and interpreters are somewhat, though not totally, orthogonal concepts: Compilers Compilers take source code and ...


5

The slice notation is this: s[start:stop:step] translated to what you're asking: s[len(s)-1:-1:-1] This is, based on the length of 5 for 'hello' s[4:-1:-1] or s[4:4:-1] which is an empty, or zero-length string.


5

When foo() returns a regular iterable, the two are equivalent. The 'magic' comes into play when foo() is a generator too. At that moment, the yield from foo() and for x in foo(): yield x cases differ materially. A generator can be sent data too, using the generator.send() method. When you use the for loop, the yield x expression 'receives' the sent data; ...


4

Qualify the method with self or the class name A. class A: @staticmethod def called(): print 'called' def caller(self): self.called() # Or A.called() NOTE I changed the method called as a static method.


4

This is explain in the struct module documentation: Note: By default, the result of packing a given C struct includes pad bytes in order to maintain proper alignment for the C types involved; similarly, alignment is taken into account when unpacking. This behavior is chosen so that the bytes of a packed struct correspond exactly to the layout in memory ...


4

Your problem is that PyDict_GetItemString(pDict, "path") will return python list and it is not callable. And when you execute PyObject_CallObject(pFunc, NULL); you will execute it. This is equal to sys.path(). This should work: PyObject *pName, *pModule, *pDict, *list, *pValue, *item; int n, i; char *name; Py_Initialize(); std::string strModule = ...


4

You're looking for the reversed function. for i, j in zip(list1, reversed(list2): print(i, j) Alternatively, depending on the data type, you can use fancy slicing. This generally works on data types that implement slicing (e.g. lists, tuples, numpy arrays), but won't work on a lot of other iterators. for i, j in zip(list1, list2[::-1]): print(i, ...


4

+= on a list is not the same as doing s.append. It's the same as doing s.extend. It only happens to look the same in this case because a string is a sequence of characters, so a one-character string is a sequence of itself. In general, it's very different. Try it with numbers, or 3-character strings. Anyway, "what is happening when you use +=" goes like ...


4

Use get and an empty string as default and substitute with None in case of empty string or empty list: self.files = self.options.get('--files', "").split(",") or None This way split is always called on a valid object, and you get None if the object is empty. EDIT Actually the tests I made used split() which uses a different algorithm than split(",") ...


4

If you want to get the first satisfactory tag and then stop, use next. found_tag = next((tag for tag in TAGS.values() if tag in myset), None) This will give None if no such tag is found. If you want to get all matching tags, you can do this: found_tags = [tag for tag in TAGS.values() if tag in myset]


4

Don't use %d to output a float, use %f. Better yet use the new format function instead, and let Python choose the best representation: print "{0} volts".format(voltage(i, r))


4

Using split and join: >>> a="45_cat_fish" >>> '_'.join(a.split('_')[1:]) 'cat_fish' Edit: split can take a maxsplit argument (see YS-L answer), so '_'.join is unnecessary, a.split('_',1)[1]… Using find >>> a[a.find('_')+1:] 'cat_fish'


4

offset is a datetime.timedelta object. If you need just the seconds, extract them with timedelta.total_seconds(): return utc_datetime + offset.total_seconds() Your function signature however, suggests it was expecting you to feed it a datetime.datetime() object, in which case you shouldn't change this function, but the code that calls it. Clearly you are ...


3

argparse already supports -- as an end-of-options terminator. The only difference is that the default handling treats the following arguments individually. Suppose prog1 simply looks like import argparse p = argparse.ArgumentParser() p.add_argument('--foo') p.add_argument('--bar') p.add_argument('remaining', nargs=argparse.REMAINDER) print p.parse_args() ...


3

You can use multiple for clauses in *-comprehension (list, set, dict, generator expression): nodes = { x for relation in relations for x in [relation.source, relation.target] } Above expression is similar to: nodes = set() for relation in relations: for x in [relation.source, relation.target]: nodes.add(x) nodes Alternative ...


3

There is no simple way to achieve what you want. The list operations raise an error, period. However you can work around by: Accessing something else when the list is empty Not using indexing In the first case you can use the fact that empty lists are false and hence (expression) or [None] will evaluate to [None] when the expression returns an empty ...


3

I would use Counter from collections. >>> c = Counter('zazzing') >>> d = {'a':1,'i':2,'g':3,'n':1,'z':1,'e':3} >>> c Counter({'z': 3, 'a': 1, 'i': 1, 'g': 1, 'n': 1}) >>> for i in c.items(): ... if d[i[0]]<i[1]: ... print "problem with ",i[0] ... problem with z And with an 'ok' word: >>> c = ...


3

Almost everyone's on GitHub these days. Fork the repos, make your changes, and point your requirements file to your forks. You might even want to make pull requests back to the maintainers, which will help these issues be fixed even more quickly.


3

Button callbacks are not called with any arguments, which makes sense, because the only information a button provides is that it has been clicked. You'll have to define the function like this: def calculate(): ... and think about another approach for how to get a value of x for inside the function. Typically, it will come from another GUI component, ...


3

Python (and most other languages) have the notion of a "file pointer" -- it's a reference to some location in the file. All reading and writing starts at the file pointer. For example, if the file pointer is at the beginning of the file, calling read() will read the entire file. If the file pointer were moved, say, 100 characters forward, calling read() ...


3

%d in string formatting is for integer decimal. If you wan float, you should be using %f Read more on string formatting options here


3

There is a modelform_factory() function in django.forms.models which dynamically constructs a ModelForm class given a model class, which sounds like it could do what you want.


3

Here is one approach. Since you want to allow non-replacement (e.g., leaving "a" as "a"), it is better to include the original character in the list of replacement values, so that the dict has, e.g., 'a': ['a', '1', '+', '=']. This can be done with: for k in d: d[k].append(k) Then: subs = [[(k, v) for v in vs] for k, vs in d.iteritems()] rez = [] ...


3

In Python 3.4+ you can use dis.get_instructions to check if BINARY_POWER instruction is present in function's code object or not(Also explained in What's new in Python 3.4 doc): >>> import dis >>> def search_instruction(code_object, instr_code): for ins in dis.get_instructions(code_object): if ins.opcode == instr_code: ...


3

Just use update(): >>> my_dict= {'C':{'3':'sd','34':'cb'}} # created by loop3 >>> my_big_dict = {} >>> my_big_dict.update(my_dict) >>> my_big_dict {'C': {'3': 'sd', '34': 'cb'}} Example with a loop: my_big_dict = {} for i in range(0, 10): # create your dict my_dict= {'A':{'1':'a','2':'b'}} ...


3

The decorator needs to return the decorated function: def timing(function): def wrapped(): import time t = time.time() function() t = time.time() - t print('Program has been running for {} seconds.'.format(t)) return wrapped @timing def main(): # some code


3

I'd personally go for Ashwini's answer if you have 3.4 at hand, however, if you need to be a bit more compatible and don't mind parsing the source, then you can make use of ast, eg: import inspect import ast def pow(x, y): return x ** y nodes = ast.walk(ast.parse(inspect.getsource(pow))) has_power = any(isinstance(node, ast.Pow) for node in nodes)


3

The reason you won't see SSL/TLS is because you're using a different port than the standard 443. That's why Wireshark is unable to detect the protocol automatically. You have two options: Decode the traffic as SSL: Analyze > Decode As > Transport > SSL > Apply Add your port: Edit > Preferences > Protocols > HTTP > SSL/TLS Ports = 443, {port} ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible