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There are a couple issues. First, when you read a file, you want to decode the raw data to unicode (you're trying to encode it). However, due to unicode incompatibility with the csv module, you have to decode after the reader has parsed it. Second, the presence of the 0xa0 byte indicates your CSV is likely encoded as Windows-1252 which is what you need to ...


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I think i did something similar a year ago. Your approach works but i think sometimes you want a specific key to be pressed by the user. My approach was to use PyUserInput PyUserInput. An example from the documentation: from pymouse import PyMouse from pykeyboard import PyKeyboard m = PyMouse() k = PyKeyboard() # pressing a key k.press_key('H') #Create ...


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You are basically grouping by state; you don't really need the first dictionary here: states = {} for disease in seconddict['all_diseases']: state = disease.pop('status') states.setdefault(state, []).append(disease) after which you can create your output: output = {'output': [ {'status': status, 'data': diseases} for status, diseases in ...


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The easiest thing to do is: list_k = [23,5,2,5,76,34,32,12,43,6] for number in list_k: the_string="The number is " + str(number) print the_string to directly iterate through the list.


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Maybe you should use hmac. generate link import hashlib import hmac import time secret = "anything you like" # such as generate from os.urandom(length) def generate(filename): current_time = str(int(time.time())) token = hmac.new(secret, current_time, hashlib.sha256).hexdigest() return ...


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I had dabbled with pyexe some time ago and had problems as well (though that was with Python2.7 and qt4). I have found pyinstaller to be a better package for executables. As the website says pyinstaller is almost ready for Python 3, it might be worth giving it a try.


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Check if you are actually normalizing both the features extracted from training data and the test data. Try using normalize from sklearn.preprocessing. I checked and your function returns slightly different values.


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Use py4j to communicate java and python and you need only secret id or user id to connect with google app engine .But if you need standalone application for both then you will need yaml file and their configuration. from py4j.java_gateway import JavaGateway gateway = JavaGateway() # connect to the JVM ...


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Why not make a copy of the slice? Then you will not have the warning. a = table.copy() You can read more in the answers to this post How to deal with this Pandas warning?.


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Here's one possible way to do it with NLTK. Imagine you're searching for the word 'feature': from nltk.stem import WordNetLemmatizer from nltk.tokenize import word_tokenize wnl = WordNetLemmatizer() text = "This is a small text, a very small text with no interesting features." tokens = [token.lower() for token in word_tokenize(text)] lemmatized_words = ...


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I was experiencing this behavior, but only when I launch with a --nosplash option to skip the splash screen in my application. That gave me a hint, and I developed this workaround using a 'dummy' splash screen: widget = QtGui.QMainWindow() # or whatever your main window class is dummy = QtGui.QSplashScreen() dummy.show() dummy.finish(widget) widget.show() ...


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Try pip install MySQL-python If you receive error mysql_config not found Run sudo apt-get install python-mysqldb


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I get the page just fine - the reason that you're getting a message saying that the page couldn't be found is because your print 'did not find' block isn't properly indented. This matters in Python! Bump it over 4 spaces: if match: print 'found', match.group() else: print 'did not find' There's one other thing. I'm not ...


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with open('input.txt', 'r') as f: x = f.read() x = x.split(',') print x The above code will open a file and perform read operation over it. In python the file read() returns a string. In the next line, i have split the returned string by using a symbol which is ',' here. So, after execution of that statement, x is now a list. You can do any ...


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Elastic search will help you. There is a package called haystack and using it you can implement elastic search. It comes with django like views. So it will be easy to integrate. For more details: https://django-haystack.readthedocs.org/en/v2.4.0/


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You can also use Py4J for this task, from py4j.java_gateway import JavaGateway gateway = JavaGateway() # connect to the JVM gateway.jvm.java.lang.System.out.println('Hello World!') You should first start the java program, and then invoke java method from python. py4j doesn't start jvm, it just connects to the already started java ...


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The inspect module is extremely powerful. To get a list of classes, for example in the csv module, you could go: import inspect, csv from pprint import pprint module = csv mod_string = 'csv' module_classes = inspect.getmembers(module, inspect.isclass) for i in range(len(module_classes)): myclass = module_classes[i][0] myclass = mod_string+'.'+myclass ...


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if I was you I would wrap the entirety of the program into a function. i.e def func_name(): print("\t\t\t\tto the pHinator 9001") ph = input("\nPlease enter a pH value:") if ph == "7": print("\nA pH value of 7 is NEUTRAL") if "0" < ph < "7": print("\nA pH value of less than 7 is ACIDIC") if "14" > ph > ...


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Extending @k4ml solution, using cert + key This will solve exceptions like: requests.exceptions.SSLError: [SSL] PEM lib (_ssl.c:2599) Solution: import requests from suds.client import Client from suds.transport.http import HttpAuthenticated from suds.transport import Reply, TransportError class RequestsTransport(HttpAuthenticated): def ...


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In python you have to explicitly define each index in a dictionary. You can have them auto created for you like this import collections auto_dict = lambda: collections.defaultdict(auto_dict) my_dict = auto_dict() my_dict['lvl1']['lvl2'] = 1 print my_dict['lvl1']['lvl2'] # 1


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Use a defaultdict: from collections import defaultdict a = defaultdict(dict) for i in range(0, 6): for j in range(0, 7): a[i][j] = 0


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Here, set one at a time: mydict = {} for i in range(0, 6): mydict[i] = {} for j in range(0, 7): mydict[i][j] = 0 return mydict That is, if you want something like this: { 0:{ 0: 0, // ... }, // ... } The problem you were running into is that you were trying to set an item of an item, before defining what ...


-1

What are you trying to do? This sets it once for the instance and ignores all other requests: >>> x = a() >>> x.g(1) 1 >>> x.t 1 >>> x.g(2) 1 >>> y = a() >>> y.g(4) 4 >>> y.t 4 >>> y.g(1) 4 But it doesn't set it for the class (all instances), as can be seen with the different values ...


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No, it is not set for all the objects if you use self. If you define the variables outside all the methods, then it becomes class variable which is same for the whole class. If you are using self then it is related to an instance of the class


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Another way would be to encode the primary key from the db in base64. That's usually how the short url-services all over the net get the short urls. The db ensures uniqueness and since it's base64 it'll take quite a few files before the urls grow long. On every request you then check your db to see if the link is still valid. If it isn't you do something ...


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Since the line unicode_csv(infile,outfile) isn't indented, it is out of the scope of the with command, and when it called, then infile and outfile are both closed. The files should be opened when they are used, not when the functions are defined, so have: with open(path, 'r') as infile, open(path + 'final.csv', 'w') as outfile: ...


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Looks like you have orphaned drawing instances. Wand leverages python's with ... as ... : keyword(s) to manage context & resources. Example... from wand.drawing import Drawing from wand.color import Color from wand.image import Image class Drawer(Drawing): def __enter__(self): super(Drawing, self).__enter__() self.fill_color = ...


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It is indeed the case of not understanding the code you're trying to execute. You want the user to provide his own image file, so the file must be uploaded. The second link you provided has almost 90% of your solution. The first link with the two text fields just passes on two strings from the request. Unless the server has a file locally with the same ...


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I'm unsure of your usecase, it seems a little odd, but why don't you just add a property on your model. For example, @property def bar(self): """ Used for DRF only. """ return None # or self.foo Then add it to your fields in the serializer (not need to use PlaceholderCharField) fields = ('id', 'foo', 'bar') The ...


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If [1,3,3,3,3,3,6] results in five pairs (k=2), you could use numpy's broadcasting feature to eliminate the Python for loops. import numpy as np import random a = random.sample(xrange(1, 29999), 29998) a = np.array(a) # or just a = np.random.randint(1, 29999, 29998) k = 2 Create a new array that contains all the integers that would make pairs b = a + k ...


1

You are installing things into the system Python. You need to install into the Anaconda Python, using pip install pygame (note that sudo pip is likely going to use the system Python again, and using sudo with the Anaconda Python is not recommended anyway).


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So finally... This was a stupid mistake... I forgot the " " around _ _doc__ ... It solves everything. But here is an other way of doing it in case. Use inspect import module functionsList = [o for o in getmembers(module) if isfunction(o[1])] docString = functionsList.__doc__ this is working !


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There is no way to do this generically, help(<function>) will at a minimum return you the function signature (including the argument names), Python is dynamically typed so you don't get any types and arguments by themselves don't tell you what the valid values are. This is where a good docstring comes in. However, the csv module does have a specific ...


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Does this help? def func_detail(func): def func_wrapper(*args,**kwargs): print(func.__name__) print(*args) print(kwargs) return func(*args,**kwargs) return func_wrapper @func_detail def foo(a,b,c,**kwargs): return 1 class Person(object): @func_detail def __init__(self,name,age,**kwargs): ...


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There is no way to define it dynamically on the database level using limit_choices_to. You simply need to define it on your form/view etc. i.e Use a modelchoicefield.


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Original series of numbers: s = pd.Series([400742773466599424, 400740479161352192, 398829879107809281, 398823962966097921, 398799036070653952], dtype=object) >>> s 0 400742773466599424 1 400740479161352192 2 398829879107809281 3 398823962966097921 4 398799036070653952 dtype: object Simply converting using ...


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If you want to make python connection with SQL Server then you my use MySQLdb module available for python 2.7 as well. import MySQLdb as mdb connectString=Server={SQL Server};Database={Database Name};UID={UserId};PWD={password} conn = mdb.connect(connectString) alternatively you can use pyodbc. import pyodbc cnxn = pyodbc.connect('DRIVER={SQL ...


0

My favorite way is using concurrent.futures which is a standard Python library (version 3.2 and above or available as a separate package for Python 2.7): from concurrent.futures import ThreadPoolExecutor executors_list = [] with ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=5) as executor: executors_list.append(executor.submit(my_func1, arg1, arg2)) ...


0

I managed to solve this by creating a custom script in Python: catnames = rasterband.GetCategoryNames() memdriver = ogr.GetDriverByName( 'Memory' ) dst_ds = memdriver.CreateDataSource( "out" ) # create a layer with a DN field that will contain the index of # each category automatically dst_layer = dst_ds.CreateLayer("out", srs = None ) fd = ogr.FieldDefn( ...


-1

Have you tried pydoc <function> ? I think it's only available in Python 3.4 or something. I can't get it working in 2.7 for whatever reason.


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Here's one way, using numpy and tabulate. The counts of the values are computed using numpy.unique. In [42]: import numpy as np In [43]: from tabulate import tabulate In [44]: x = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 9, 9] In [45]: values, counts = np.unique(x, return_counts=True) In [46]: values ...


1

I think the paper referred to something slightly different. A Hermitian matrix is one that that's equal to its complex conjugate transpose. However, the fft of real input is "Hermite-symmetric". It's equal to its complex conjugate, but not its complex conjugate transpose. On a side note, I may be getting the terms a bit confused, as the only time I've ...


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If you have repeating keys you need to store the values in some container, if you want the data ordered you will need to use an OrderedDict: import csv from collections import OrderedDict with open("in.csv") as infile, open('file2.csv', mode='w') as outfile: d = OrderedDict() reader, writer = csv.reader(infile), csv.writer(outfile) header = ...


0

I use this code to remove punctuation: import nltk def getTerms(sentences): tokens = nltk.word_tokenize(sentences) words = [w.lower() for w in tokens if w.isalnum()] print tokens print words getTerms("hh, hh3h. wo shi 2 4 A . fdffdf. A&&B ")


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from multiprocessing import Process from time import sleep def f(name): print 'hello', name sleep(1) Consider above: if you were to do this: f('bob') #start f('alice') #wait until bob's done f('jack') #wait until alice is done f('cake') #wait until jack is done f('paul') #wait until cake is done print 'done' you will end up waiting for 5 ...


0

you can use multiprocessing or threading threading in python doesnt actually run in parallel but allow you to run the functions at the same time (and python will iterate them, doing a few lines from each at a time) with multiprocessing they WILL run in parallel (assuming you have multiple cpu cores) but they wont share memory. here is a sample with ...


0

After a few days , I came up with a solution. This is definitely not the best way to go about it(I would be glad if more people posted their solutions), but It does show the output EXACTLY like in my original picture. def makeFlake(length,depth,isRoot=True): """ This function draws the flakes. To draw the smaller flakes, this function is called ...


0

Easiest way is to use a separate Python XML parser rather than the GDAL/OGR package. import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET tree = ET.parse( file ) root = tree.getroot() description = root[0][1].text


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Here's a variation on @detly's answer that lets you specify the messages from your main thread, instead of printing them from your target functions. This creates a wrapper function which calls your target and then prints a message before terminating. You could modify this to perform any kind of standard cleanup after each thread completes. #!/usr/bin/python ...


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import thread thread.start_new_thread(my_func1, ()) thread.start_new_thread(my_func2, ()) thread.start_new_thread(my_func3, ()) thread.start_new_thread(my_func4, ()) thread.start_new_thread(my_func5, ()) You can thread functions like that



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