New answers tagged

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In Boto3, if you're checking for either a folder (prefix) or a file using list_objects. You can use the existence of 'Contents' in the response dict as a check for whether the object exists. It's another way to avoid the try/except catches as @EvilPuppetMaster suggests import boto3 client = boto3.client('s3') results = ...


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sys.argv is simply a list of the commandline arguments. argparse is a full featured commandline parser which generally parses sys.argv and gives you back the data in a much easier to use fashion.


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I would recommend you use argparse for your command line arguments for two reasons. Making an arg is very straight forward as pointed out in the documentation, and second because you want a help function argparse gives you it for free. Documentation: https://docs.python.org/2/howto/argparse.html Let me know if you need more help.


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The problem in your code is that key is defined as a local variable rather than a global one. Something like this should work: LETTERS = 'ZABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXY' def main(): myMode = input("Encrypt 'e' or Decrypt 'd': ") if myMode == 'encrypt' or myMode == 'e': translated = encryptFile() elif myMode == 'decrypt' or myMode == 'd': ...


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As I suggested in my comment, the fault was casting a char pointer to a POINTER(ctypes.c_byte). Apparently c_byte is signed, which was where the confusion was arising from. Basically my script was adding up a load of negative numbers. Sorry numpy, it wasn't your fault this time! The offending line should have read: imgPtr2 = ctypes.cast(imgPtr, ...


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Use sum: summed_x2 = sum(listx2)


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This is my interpretation of the Luhn algo. def luhn(sequence): digits = [int(digit) for digit in str(sequence)] # converts a full string of nums to a list comp of individual numbers odd = digits[-1::-2] # string stepping (-1) indicates last item in list (-2) means to travel back another 2 even = digits[-2::-2] checksum = 0 checksum += sum(odd) evenmod = [] ...


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I have combined two answers into following snippet: def __iter__(self): ordered_fields = collections.OrderedDict() for name in getattr(self, 'field_order', []): ordered_fields[name] = self._fields.pop(name) ordered_fields.update(self._fields) self._fields = ordered_fields return super(BaseForm, self).__iter__() It's iter on ...


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Here's one possible solution, which I've broken down in to manageable steps: #roll the whole array rolled_array = np.roll(old_array,-1,axis=0) #Create a partial mask based on the first slice mask_part = np.where(old_array[0,:,:] < 5 , True,False) #Replicate the partial mask for the other two slices mask_full = np.array([mask_part,mask_part,mask_part]) ...


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Simplify the publication selector to just: div.results > div.item Demo from the shell: $ scrapy shell "http://search.scielo.org/?q=science&lang=pt&count=50&from=0&output=site&sort=&format=summary&fb=&page=1" >>> for publication in response.css('div.results > div.item'): ... ...


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Thanks for @Alasdair for the solution. Turns out it was quite simple. Just remove override_settings and import outbox. tests.py from django.core.mail import outbox class UserModelTest(TestCase): def setUp(self): self.user = User.objects.create_user(email='user@info.com', password='0000') def test_send_password_token(self): ...


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from Bio import SeqIO my_data = [] with open("test.fasta", "r") as handle: for record in SeqIO.parse(handle, 'fasta'): if 'Homo sapiens' in record.name: my_data.append(str(record.seq)) with open("output.fasta", "w") as out: for item in my_data: out.write("{0}\n===End===\n".format(item))


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I guess this is what you are looking for: AWS API GateWay (Rest), Lambda (InBetween/Logic) and DynamoDB(Data). Tutorial: https://snowulf.com/2015/08/05/tutorial-aws-api-gateway-to-lambda-to-dynamodb/ note: you can use Python in Lambda


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The first answer worked for me, but I think it is cleaner to alter the __init__ method and pass the attribute in the constructor: class ThreadedTCPServer(socketserver.ThreadingMixIn, socketserver.TCPServer): def __init__(self, host_port_tuple, streamhandler, Controllers): super().__init__(host_port_tuple, streamhandler) self.Controllers ...


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In Python 3.0+, this looks like: from urllib.parse import quote_plus import json import requests def bing_search(query): # Your base API URL; change "Image" to "Web" for web results. url = "https://api.datamarket.azure.com/Bing/Search/v1/Image" # Query parameters. Don't try using urlencode here. # Don't ask why, but Bing needs the "$" in ...


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In Python 3 encodestring docs says: def encodestring(s): """Legacy alias of encodebytes().""" import warnings warnings.warn("encodestring() is a deprecated alias, use encodebytes()", DeprecationWarning, 2) return encodebytes(s) Here is working code for Python 3.5.1, it also shows how to url encode: def ...


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I think you can use nlargest - you can change 1 to 5: s = df['Neighborhood'].groupby(df['Borough']).value_counts() print s Borough Bronx Melrose 7 Manhattan Midtown 12 Lincoln Square 2 Staten Island Grant City 11 dtype: int64 print s.groupby(level=0).nlargest(1) Bronx ...


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Use side_effect to queue up a series of return values. c.config = Mock() c.config.get.side_effect = ['xxx', 'yyy', 'zzz'] The first time c.config.get is called, it will return 'xxx'; the second time, 'yyy'; and the third time, 'zzz'. (If it is called a fourth time, it will raise a StopIteration error.)


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You have error message similar to this Exception in Tkinter callback Traceback (most recent call last): File "/usr/lib/python2.7/lib-tk/Tkinter.py", line 1539, in __call__ return self.func(*args) File "<pyshell#3>", line 11, in RunScript if PauseStatus: UnboundLocalError: local variable 'PauseStatus' referenced before assignment You have ...


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It seems like you might have some issues with locating the file directory and opening the file. That being said, your job is relatively easy one once you have the file data. You want to read in the fasta file, remove the header and convert it to a list, then simply replace the indices in your mutation file as "N" and recreate the fasta. Here are the steps: ...


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sorted_list = sorted(glob.iglob('upload/*.log'), key=os.path.getctime) sorted_list[-2]


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I think this can be a suitable solution: # for the min + 1 sorted(glob.iglob('*.log'), key=os.path.getctime)[1] # for the second newest (max - 1) sorted(glob.iglob('*.log'), key=os.path.getctime)[-1] So basically glob.iglob('*.log') is just an array (to be more precise it result is a generator) - you can sort it by ctime and find what you want.


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You can try workaround. Use Word's search/replace to get the text in one stroke. For example search for "XXXCLIENTNAMEXXX" and replace it again with "XXXCLIENTNAMEXXX".


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Besides what sabbahillel said, test returns the correct listing, however this parse function looks weird, since you ask it to print the first item in the list, then the last, so it won't print all the files as you wish. The following code will print it correctly, although I believe your parse function is the root of your confusion: import os ...


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conda virtual environments will help you a lot. It's good practice to use environments for your projects. And it'll help you avoid causing potential problems with your system's Python. Try this on the command line: conda create -n myenv anaconda source activate myenv jupyter notebook That default env will already have pandas; you can install most other ...


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What you want is a TitleExtension, see the documentation.


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Note that the def parse(filename, length): print filename[0] print test[length-1] uses test. You should probably make it def parse(filename, length): print filename[0] print filename[length-1] Then if nodename and "Nv" in file: does the in first and then does the and. 5.15. Operator precedence It thus is the equivalent of if ...


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Port Number should also be a number. import time, socket, os, sys, string import subprocess def restart_program(): subprocess.call(['python', 'main.py']) print ("DDoS mode loaded") host = "YOUR_SITE.com" port = 80 message = "+---------------------------+" conn = 10000 ip = socket.gethostbyname(host) print "[" + ip + "]" print "[Ip is locked]" print ...


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If you really need a local list there is not much you can do here but one improvement is to collect only a single column not a whole DataFrame: df.select(col_name).flatMap(lambda x: x).collect()


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I believe I figured out the things conspiring to cause this behavior. First, the Popen() function does not normally wait until the external command finishes before proceeding past it. Second, because as user glibdud mentioned in his answer to my other question, NamedTemporaryFile acts like TemporaryFile in that It will be destroyed as soon as it is ...


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You have to do the conversion by yourself in the migration: for restaurant in Restaurant.objects.all(): restaurant.lat_duplicate = float(restaurant.lat) restaurant.lng_duplicate = float(restaurant.lng) restaurant.save() Note that if you have fields that are NULL or contains an empty string or a string that is not an acceptable ...


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So the short answer is that to avoid needing to enter second factor codes, you can create a "Personal Access Token" by accessing your settings on the website. When you have that you can pass that as the token parameter to github3.login. The long answer is that calling login doesn't call this but instead calling organization and iter_repos triggers the two ...


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To make your life a bit easier, you may want to consider using Biopython to read in your fasta and do your converting. Here's some documentation to get you started http://biopython.org/DIST/docs/tutorial/Tutorial.html#htoc16 Here is some starter code. from Bio import SeqIO handle = open("example.fasta", "rU") output_handle = open("output.fasta", "w") for ...


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One way you can handle this is to convert aRDD to RDD[DenseVector]: from pyspark.mllib.linalg import SparseVector, DenseVector aRDD = sc.parallelize(a).mapValues(DenseVector) bRDD = sc.parallelize(b).mapValues(create_sparce_matrix) and use basic NumPy operations: def mul(x, y): assert isinstance(x, DenseVector) assert isinstance(y, SparseVector) ...


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I was able to reproduce this. Indeed, if you're unpickling a large (about 300M) file, a lot of extra memory stay used. In my case, 1.6G was used by a process just to keep original generated data_dict, and 2.9G if I load it from file. However, if you'll run unpickling in a subprocess, system will do a full memory clean after process join(). (as stated in ...


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There are so many things wrong with your code, first of all you don't do anything with rate secondly as @SirParselot stated you don't need the second loop when comparing items in python be careful about user or...consider this string = 'asdfdfdsf' if string == 'i' or 'm': print('yeah') else: print('no') will print out yeah when you expect it ...


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First of all: It was a bad idea to keep links to shared objects(Queue, Value) as members of class for the purpose of using by processes. It was working somehow without demonization. But when the same code was run in DaemonContext the os.fork() happened and somehow messed up links to objects. I am not quite sure if Multiprocessing module was designed to work ...


-1

That's my init class; def init(self, row, column): self.row = row self.column = column I need to calculate the distance from start to end. According to this formula = |end(row)-start(row)| + |end(column)-start(column)|


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Assuming that start and end are (x, y) pairs, def manhattan_distance(start, end): sx, sy = start ex, ey = end return abs(ex - sx) + abs(ey - sy) For higher dimensionalities, this can be extended like def manhattan_distance(start, end): return sum(abs(e - s) for s,e in zip(start, end))


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You could use Models.FileField. Use the upload_to attribute to point to the remote storage.


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So you have one model in which you want to save a list of strings (links). The easiest way to do that is by creating a separate model with a textfield and a one-to-many relation.


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This is really just a collection of ideas that was too big for a comment. Your best bet is probably DBpedia. It's a semantic mirror of Wikipedia, with much more sophisticated query possibilities than Wikipedia's API has. As you can see in this paper it can handle fairly complex spatial queries, but you'll need to get into SPARQL. Here's a figure from that ...


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Yes there is a way to do this. if you are on a server running some form of linux you can use crontab. As for server hostage, I don't know of any free servers but there is always servers for small fees.


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I use PyScripter and Python 2.7 and also had the problem of plt.show() blocking all executions until you manually close the figures. I found that changing the Python engine to 'remote (Wx)' lets the script run after plt.show() - so could close figures with plt.close().


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You can use exec , but make sure what pass to exec is under your control . n = 10 for i in range(n): exec('list{0} = []'.format(i)) And what i recommend is to use a 2d list (list of lists). a_lists_list = [[] for i in range(n)] you can access any list you want with index. print(a_lists_list[2])


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In case you face the problem using TCPServer or SimpleHTTPServer, override SocketServer.TCPServer.allow_reuse_address (python 2.7.x) or socketserver.TCPServer.allow_reuse_address (python 3.x) attribute class MyServer(socketserver.TCPServer): allow_reuse_address = True server = MyServer((HOST, PORT), MyHandler) server.serve_forever()


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def result(x): #input should be the string repeated = [] listed = x.split() for each in listed: number = listed.count(each) if number > 1: repeated.append(each) return set(repeated) #there can't be repeated values in a set


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Each line in a file will contain the newline escape character: \n at the end of the line. Here's how you can loop over the file: f = open('words.txt') for line in f: secret = line[:-1] # will extract a substring not containing the newline char # then do what you want with secret like: do_decoding(secret) Hope it helps.


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You should have used dictionary here. Dictionary already contains elements in random order. dict = {"question1": "ans1", "question2": "ans2", "question3": "ans3"} for s in dict.keys(): ans = raw_input(s) if ans == dict[s]: print "success" else: print "failure"


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You can try using regex to find out the proper words neglecting punctuations, try this import re import collections sentence="Hi my Name is Bill, Bill likes coding, coding is fun" wordList = re.sub("[^\w]", " ", sentence).split() print [item for item, count in collections.Counter(wordList).items() if count > 1] and collections should do the trick of ...



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