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The easiest thing would be to try to take advantage of the subproccess modules partial support for the STARTUPINFO structure. Something like this: info = subprocess.STARTUP_INFO() info.dwFlags = subprocess.STARTF_USESTDHANDLES | subprocess.STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW info.wShowWindow = subprocess.SW_HIDE process = subprocess.Popen("ffmpeg -i output.wav ...


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The stack trace shows that it crashes inside wxGLCanvas::Create(), so the OpenGL support is definitely compiled in, otherwise you wouldn't have wxGLCanvas there at all. Unfortunately I have no idea about what happens there, notably there should be no way to end up inside Reparent() when creating the window. Maybe the function names are just off (because of ...


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of coarse ... you even tagged it with the module you would use ... subproccess.Popen("ffmpeg -i output.wav output.flac".split(),shell=True).communicate() should do it ...


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Adding a "poll" time cut usage down. Like this: # connect to gpsd g = gps.gps('127.0.0.1',2947) g.stream(gps.WATCH_ENABLE) while True: try: if poisonpillq.get(True,polltime) == '!STOP!': break except Queue.Empty: while g.waiting(): rpt = g.next() if rpt['class'] == 'TPV': --- store_gps_data ...


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max_val returned by minMaxLoc() can be used for the threshold you're looking for. If the detection is very good, this value will be highest (1, if I recall).


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you could use the staticmethod decorator to ensure your class does not get passed in >>> class Foo(object): ... DICT_TYPE = staticmethod(my_dict) ... >>> f = Foo() >>> f.DICT_TYPE() {}


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Yes, Python functions do carry that information. Easiest would be to use the inspect.getfullargspec() function to extract this information, or from Python 3.3 onwards, using the Signature objects. The inspect.getfullargspec() return value has a .args attribute listing the arguments in order: >>> import inspect >>> def f(x: int, y: int) ...


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The problem is that you need to return a FieldFile, so that way you can access to the properties of it, in django's source code you can find a class named FileDescriptor this is the parent of ImageFileDescriptor, if you look at the FileDescriptor class under the name you can find the doc of the class and it says: """ The descriptor for the file ...


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You must have actual code in each if and elif block, you cannot just use a comment. Use pass in such cases: if user_input == ('1', '[1]'): pass elif user_input == ('2', '[2]'): pass else: print('Please enter a valid input...') user_input()


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Use a raw string literal instead: r'\xb9\xfe' or print the output of repr() of your string: print repr('\xb9\xfe')


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from collections import Counter cards = ["9D", "6S", "KD", "9H", "6D", "QC", "9C"] ranks,suites = zip(*cards) print Counter(ranks).most_common(1)[0]


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You have to perform a curve fitting procedure, which is called a regression problem in mathematics. In your case it seems that data is more or less exponential, but you can fit arbitrary function through scipy.optimize.curve_fit http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/scipy.optimize.curve_fit.html


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you can return the deck and use it wherever you want ... or you could make it a classmethod instead class Player(): @classmethod def generateCardDeck(cls): cls.deck = someCalculations Player.generateCardDeck() print Player.deck I suppose you could do roughly the same with static method class Player(): @staticmethod ...


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Ok, I got it. Of course, I have to include package = os.path.dirname(os.path.dirname(os.path.realpath(__file__))) sys.path.append(package) before including my custom packages.


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fhand is an array/list/collection/file handler/whatever of iterable items - it doesn't matter what it is, but it's a collection of them. If it's a file handler, a file when read is usually read line by line, hence why the for loop works on a per line basis. The for loop is basically a "for each thing in list". I think the "line" variable is what's ...


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fhand is an iterable object of strings. line is hence a single string member in that object. You can name it whatever you like, it is still regarded as a string.


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I have read arcGIS documentation and found out some ways to do so: Execute SQL statement which explains here: http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#/Executing_SQL_using_an_ArcSDE_connection/002z00000021000000/ arcpy.da.SearchCursor("Input_Table", "CategoryID"), sql_clause=(None, "GROUP BY Input_Table, CategoryID")]. It shoud sum. ...


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This is happening because you're not using an if __name__ == "__main__": guard, while also using multiprocessing.Process on Windows. Windows needs to re-import your module in the child processes it spawns, which means it will keep creating new threads to handle inputs and watch files. This, of course, is a recipe for disaster. Do this to fix the issue: if ...


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BEWARE OF parse_requirements BEHAVIOUR! Please note that pip.req.parse_requirements will change underscores to dashes. This was enraging me for a few days before I discovered it. Example demonstrating: from pip.req import parse_requirements # tested with v.1.4.1 reqs = ''' example_with_underscores example-with-dashes ''' with open('requirements.txt', ...


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For the software side, you could use RPIO.PWM. For the hardware side, you need to apply power and signal to the servo and make sure all the grounds are connected. These blog posts will help you understand how to use servos and what the three wires are: http://www.pololu.com/blog/hobby-servos


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Or u can simply say If not the_entry_wiget.get (): #do something


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shutil.copyfile(src, dst) copies the contents of a single file, so it is looking for the *.ts filename. The path is written with '\\' because it is an escape character; it is how you write the \ character. You can use the glob module to do Unix style pathname pattern expansion, though. This script should work if you run it from the directory containing ...


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Answer to my own question: Luckily, Eclipse helped me out. It's from dbmanagement.DBWriter import DBWriter. A little redundant, but hopefully this helps someone. Where dbmanagement is the package name, DBWriter is the module name as well as the class name


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It seems like DBWriter is the module not the class. If I understood correctly you probably need something like: dbW = DBWriter.DBWriter('/dir/to/db') to access the object DBWriter inside your DBWriter module. Or as an alternative, you can just import the class itself (and not the entire module), with: from dbmanagement.DBWriter import DBWriter


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If you want to add parameters to the URL, then do so with the params parameter: extra_params = {'param1': value1, 'param2': value2} request = requests.post(self.base_url + 'login_token/', params=extra_params, auth=prepare).json() Note that requests supports loading JSON natively, using the response.json() ...


3

You have hit a pecularity in the way I/O is implemented at the C level. When you opened the file in + mode (write and read in your case), then you must issue a flush or seek before 'switching' modes, otherwise the behaviour is undefined. In this case, you added uninitialised memory to the file. There is a report for this in the Python issue tracker: ...


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You need something like mendeley = jsonassoc[u'readers'][u'mendeley'] if 'readers' in jsonassoc and 'mendeley' in jsonassoc['readers'] Alternatively, you could use the get function to assign the default: mendeley = jsonassoc.get('readers', {}).get('mendeley', '') There are also some libraries for working with JSON that will allow you to access ...


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use dictionary .get method: d.get('key1',{}).get('key2') doing so you will by-pass check for the key.


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Depends on what you call "slow", doesn't it? The code below takes time python ./testling.py >/dev/null 0.0954809188843 s real 0m0.776s user 0m0.228s sys 0m0.348s on a 4 yrs old Quad core. And pls attend - the significant profiling figure is the first line, the one < 0.1 s; real, user etc are including starting the interpreter, the ...


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In addition to Code Painter's suggestion to use CA_BUNDLE, you can tighten things a bit. The CA_BUNDLE solution suffers from the fact that any CA in the bundle can claim to certify the site. To tighten the solution, use the StartCom CA since StartCom certifies the site. Don't worry about Verify return code: 19 (self signed certificate in certificate chain) ...


2

You could use exception handling to immediately jump back to getNumber(). class NoNumberException(Exception): pass def getNumber3(arg): if arg!=7: print 'arg!=7' raise NoNumberException return 7 def getNumber5(arg): if arg!=5: print 'getNumber5(): arg!=5' return number7=getNumber3(7) if not number7: ...


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import glob import os path = 'D:\HeadFirstPython\chapter3' os.chdir(path) with open("temp.txt","w") as f: # with automatically closes your files my_l = [x.replace(".jpg","").rsplit("_",1) for x in glob.glob("*.jpg")] # list of lists with open("temp.txt", "w") as f: for x in glob.glob("*.jpg"): print x.replace(".jpg", "").rsplit("_", 1) # ...


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At the line line=string.rstrip(line), you are removing trailing whitespace from the line. At the next line, line=string.split(line), you are splitting the line into words. After that point, line is a list of each word in the message. So in fact when you check len(line) > 3, you're checking if the line has more than three words. When you want to extract ...


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From the Bash man page: -c string If the -c option is present, then commands are read from string. If there are arguments after the string, they are assigned to the positional parameters, starting with $0. E.g. $ bash -c 'echo x $0 $1 $2' foo bar baz x foo bar baz You, however don’t want to assign to the ...


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Using char * paramsList[] = {"/usr/bin/python", "/tmp/bla.py",NULL}; and execv("/usr/bin/python",paramsList); // python system call caused in a successful invocation of the python script named bla.py


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On the menubar go to Window -> Preferences -> Pydev -> Interpreters -> Python Remove the interpreter and click on Quick Auto Config. That should do the trick. Make sure django is installed first.


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If you are using getText() or text when defining soup you will get the error: `soup = BeautifulSoup(your_html).getText()` # will give error or: soup = BeautifulSoup(html_doc).text` # will give error Using soup.find(attrs = {'itemprop':'publisher'}).getText() etc.. is completely valid. As per Jon Clements comment, using print type(soup) will ...


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if file.endswith('.jpg'): file = file.rsplit('_',1) print file[0], print file[1].rsplit('.',1)[0] print(file, file=data)


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for rule_num, group in DictItems.items(): print rule_num for index, lst in group.items(): print " %s: %s" % (index, lst) ... Rule2 1: ['S2', 'S3'] 2: ['S2', 'S4', 'S5'] Rule1 1: ['S1', 'S2', 'S3'] 2: ['S4', 'S5'] 3: ['S8']


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The requests module (or actually urllib3 below it) fails to open the CA certificates file. If you don't want to verify the server's certificate, you can change the call to: r2 = requests.get('https://www.hitbox.tv/api/chat/servers', timeout=timeoutDefault, verify=False) If you care about certificates (and you should), make sure that CA ...


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To answer your question, you could nest another loop within the original loop, like so: for key, value in DictItems.items(): print key for key2, value2 in value.items(): print key2, value2 And so forth, down as many levels as you want. If you want to get fancy, you can get all recursive up in there but for two levels that will suffice. NB. ...


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I think you are overcomplicating this. Given this dict: >>> DictItems = { ... 'Rule1' : {1 : ['S1', 'S2', 'S3'], 2 : ['S4', 'S5'], 3: ['S8']}, ... 'Rule2' : {1 : ['S2', 'S3'], 2 : ['S2', 'S4', 'S5']} ... } You access individual elements using either a key (for a dict) or index (for a sequence) in one or more ...


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dict.items() gives you the (key, value) pairs, and will not further unpack the contained dictionaries. You can only unpack the key and value, where the value is another dictionary object here. To get to the nested dictionary, iterate over that too, perhaps: for rule, rule_mapping in DictItems.items(): print rule for rulemap_number, listvalue in ...


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Try: $ pip install --process-dependency-links file://path/package-0.0.1.tar.gz Note that this tag is removed from pip in pip 1.6. See this article on pip.pypa.io for more information. In pip 1.5 processing dependency links was deprecated and it was removed completely in pip 1.6. There's also a lengthy discussion ( issue #1519 ) regarding pip & ...


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Your input file is a tab-delimited file, I'd use the csv module to read the data; use set() to then creates sets of the 3rd column: import csv with open('test.txt', 'rb') as infh: reader = csv.reader(infh, delimiter='\t') data = [(row[0], set(row[2].split(','))) for row in reader] Now we have data we can work with; we can ignore the second ...


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So, taking the comments in regard (i.e. you have to make it yourself in pygame), I've got nothing better to do with myself so I'll outline how you can do it. Defining toolbar as a class, you can fit this to the top of your window and let it deal with the buttons: class Toolbar: def __init__(self, width, height): #And other customisation options ...


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[from the comments above] If you know fs is 1x1, try passing fs[0,0] to welch. The docstring for welch says fs should be a float, so it might behave unpredictably if you give it a two-dimensional array. – Warren Weckesser 22 hours ago This worked well. The code I implemented is: # 1 x 1 array, sampling frequency (22050 Hz) fs = mat['Fs'] fs = fs[0,0] ...


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The issue is with your init_printing statement. In a notebook, you do not want to run latex, instead you should use mathjax, so try this instead: init_printing(use_latex='mathjax') When I use this, I get normal pretty printing everywhere, even when I have a sympy expression as the last line of the cell.


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I found this question while researching a way to make simple directory trees inside of a project directory. I am somewhat new to Python, and I struggle when data structures get too complex, i.e. nested. It is much easier on my brain's mental mapping to keep track of small lists of iterables, so I came up with two very basic defs to help me with directory ...


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You cannot sum a string value and a timedelta() object; you can only add timedelta() objects to other timedeltas, datetime objects and date objects. You'll have to parse the time value first; you probably should parse it to another timedelta() object (as a duration): hours, minutes, seconds = map(int, time_limit.split(':')) time_limit = ...



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