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You can compute the log-likelihood of data by calling the logpdf method of stats.gamma and then summing the array. The first bit of code is from your example: In [63]: import scipy.stats as ss In [64]: np.random.seed(123) In [65]: alpha = 5 In [66]: loc = 100.5 In [67]: beta = 22 In [68]: data = ss.gamma.rvs(alpha, loc=loc, scale=beta, size=10000) In ...


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You can try something like this: import re s = "here's an example Man of the Match match and a Red Card match, and another Red Card match" patterns = [ 'Man of the Match', 'Goal', 'Assist', 'Yellow Card', 'Red Card', ] repattern = '|'.join(patterns) matches = re.findall(repattern, s, re.IGNORECASE) print matches # ['Man of the Match', ...


2

Assuming you have permission to do so, try logging in with selenium as i think that will be more inline with what you are ultimately trying to do. from selenium import webdriver USERNAME = "foo@bar.com" PASSWORD = "superelite" # create a driver driver = webdriver.Firefox() # get the homepage driver.get("http://tx3.netease.com/logging.php?action=login") ...


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You have to use the figure returned by the DataFrame.plot() command: ax = df.plot() fig = ax.get_figure() fig.savefig('asdf.png')


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You are using two assignment statements. Perhaps you should give dict.get() a second argument: day_num = weekdays.get(day, -1) That second argument is a default to return if day is not present in the dictionary; the default default is None but here I return -1 instead. This saves you a test for is None and a second assignment.


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I've ran into this issue and the cause was a corrupted db file (usually named "celerybeat-schedule"). Solution would be to delete the existing db file and restart the process. Relavent: https://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-list/2009-October/554545.html


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I suspect your problem is that you are calling app.run(). The app.run() function starts Flask's development web server. When you use a web server other than Flask's you do not have to call this function, your web server (gunicorn in this case) will have its own way to start. Normally the app.run() line is inside a if __name__ == '__main__': conditional ...


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Unfortunately, Status model is not really well documented in the tweepy docs. user_timeline() method returns a list of Status object instances. You can explore the available properties and methods using dir(), or look at the actual implementation. For example, from the source code you can see that there are author, user and other attributes: for status in ...


1

The file type has been removed from Python 3. Look at the io module instead: >>> import io >>> help(io.TextIOBase.read) Help on method_descriptor: read(...) Read at most n characters from stream. Read from underlying buffer until we have n characters or we hit EOF. If n is negative or omitted, read until EOF.


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Here's a way to do it that leverages the bisect module to determine which rule to use for each year: import bisect rules = { 3: 15, 6: 21 } def generate_time_off_paid_days_list(years, rules, default): r_list = rules.keys() r_list.sort() # sorted list of the keys in the rules dict d = {} for y in years: # First, find the index of ...


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A way that emulate an atomic group (that is interesting to reduce the backtracking when the pattern must fail): re.findall(r'"(?=((?:[^"\\]+|\\.)*))\1"', s) demo


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Try this, it's a quick and dirty solution that works fine, but won't be efficient if the input list is really big: lst = ['GATTACA', 'etc'] [x for x in ''.join(',' if not e else e for e in lst).split(',') if x]


1

I think that the best way to do this is with a generator. That way, you don't have to deal with list.append, deep-copying lists or any of that nonsense. def my_generator(max): for n in range(max+1): yield list(range(n+1)) Then, you just have to list-ify it: >>> list(my_generator(5)) [[0], [0,1], [0,1,2], [0,1,2,3], [0,1,2,3,4], ...


0

You can use this regex: "[\w\s\\"]+(?<!\\)" Working demo Edit: I noticed you updated your input sample. For the updated input, you can use this regex: (?:\\\\"|")[\w\s\\"]+(?:\\\\"|(?<!\\)") Working demo


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In your settings file define STATICFILES_DIRS to also include the /home/arnav/Documents/covers path: STATICFILES_DIRS = ( '/home/arnav/project/static', '/home/arnav/Documents/covers', ) This will tell django to first look in the project static directory, but also look in covers for static files.


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You could try the below regex to match the strings that starts with " (which was not preceded by \ symbol) upto the next " symbol which also not preceded by \ (?<!\\)".*?(?<!\\)" DEMO >>> s = r'"a string" ... "another \"string\"" ... "yet another \"string" ... "failed string\"' >>> m = re.findall(r'".*?[^\\]"', s) >>> m ...


0

You are trying to call the documentation URL; the returned page explains how to use the API< it is not the actual API method itself. Call the actual API at: http://ws.audioscrobbler.com/2.0/ and give the method as a parameter: params = { "method": "track.getSimilar", "track": "Believe", "artist": "Cher", "limit": "5", ...


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StaticPlaceholder is a model that has two foreign key relationships to the Placeholder model, one is called draft, the other is called public. Both will give you a Placeholder instance. You could just use: add_plugin( placeholder=static_placeholder.draft, plugin_type='TextPlugin', language='en', ) and it will work, but keep in mind that you ...


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Normally, sphere collisions are just filter for real collision tests. You can either: decide to limit collisions to that, for example if it's a game. implement real collisions and do the full math. You're basically intersecting the rotated edges of the two rectangles (16 cases). Intersect two edges as if they were lines, there will be only one point of ...


1

Your code is written in a very un-Pythonic style that suggests you're translating directly from C code. (Also, you should basically never use input(); it's insecure because it evaluates arbitrarily user-entered Python code! Use raw_input() instead.) If you rewrite it in a more Pythonic style, it becomes clear what the problem is: import math # you don't ...


0

Queue.get() blocks if the queue is empty. Use get_nowait(), which will raise an exception if there's nothing there.


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I would recommend wxpython. It's very easy to use and the documentation is pretty good.


1

You can do: M=[1] L=[M] for e in range(5): li=L[-1][:] li.append(li[-1]+1) L.append(li) Or more tersely: for e in range(5): L.append(L[-1][:]+[L[-1][-1]+1])


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This will be based on iterate from Haskell. iterate :: (a -> a) -> a -> [a] iterate f x returns an infinite list of repeated applications of f to x: iterate f x == [x, f x, f (f x), ...] In Python: def iterate(f, x): while True: yield x x = f(x) Example usage: >>> import itertools.islice >>> ...


2

Game = Iteration is probably why. When j = 1, Game will be a list with only one item because of that. Then, Game[1]-Game[2] will be out of bounds.


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The usual mathematical (recursive) method to compute the sequence up to some limit (this is not necessarily the best/most efficient method!): Link to demo here #include <iostream> using namespace std; int fibo(int x) { if (x == 0) return 0; if (x == 1) return 1; return fibo(x-1)+fibo(x-2); } int main() { int j=1,limit=100; do ...


2

Try this: M = [1] L = [M] for _ in xrange(3): L += [L[-1] + [L[-1][-1] + 1]] After the above code is executed, L will contain [[1], [1, 2], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3, 4]]. Explanation: The first two lines simply seed the iteration with initial values The for line states how many loops we want to perform after the initial value has been set, 3 in this ...


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Your problem is that updated_bal isn't changing, yet you are setting out_bal to it each time you iterate, and then conditioning the loop on out_bal becoming reduced in value. It looks to me like you are thinking that updated_bal changes on each loop iteration, based on its component parts. In order for that to work, you would need to instead use a function ...


6

When adding a list object M to another list, you are only adding a reference; continuing to manipulate the list M means you will see those changes reflected through the other reference(s) too: >>> M = [] >>> resultlist = [] >>> resultlist.append(M) >>> M is resultlist[0] True >>> M.append(1) >>> ...


0

Thanks ! I did it with #!/usr/bin/env python import commands def uuid(): return commands.getstatusoutput('uuidgen') if __name__ == "__main__": print uuid()[1] It gives nice expected answer e79a890c-5e3a-4c3a-bfdb-5377389b69ac


1

Try this: #include <iostream> using namespace std; int fibo(int b,int a=0){ int x=0; int y=1; while(x<=b) { int z=x+y; int x0=x; x=y; y=z; if(x>a && x<b) { cout << x << " "; } } } int main() { fibo(100); return 0; } ...


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You should put django-admin.py in your %PATH% directory, and launch it directly without pythonbefore. More explanation about PATH here.


2

Here's the exact port of your code from Python to C++ #include <iostream> using namespace std; void fibo(int b,int a=0){ int x=0; int y=1; int z, x0; while( x <= b ) { z= x + y; x0 = x; x = y; y = z; if(x > a) { cout << x0 << endl; } } } int main() { ...


0

You won't be able to get down to rolling_max speed, but you can often shave off an order of magnitude or so by dropping down to numpy via .values: def meanmax_np(ii, df): ii = ii.astype(int) n = df["A"].values[ii].max() + df["B"].values[ii].max() return n/2.0 gives me >>> %timeit res = pd.rolling_apply(df.ii, 26, lambda x: meanmax(x, ...


1

Here is a rough sketch of an algorithm. Convert your graph into a distance matrix. Select a cell (v_0) at random, using the vanilla Python random function. Assuming the graph is undirected, grab either the column or the row containing v_0 (it's symmetric, so they're the same). Use a weighted choice function to grab a vertex that's likely to be far from ...


0

All widgets have size-allocate signal. The "size-allocate" signal is emitted when widget is given a new space allocation. Perhaps you can use that.


2

General way, as alecxe suggested, "to install and configure the extension first, then use that firefox profile with selenium". This will probably work with any extension. I also search for configuration in prefs.js (or about:conf) and found out, that it stores the value in "refcontrol.actions" preference. This way you will be able to change the extension ...


0

Actually @tcaswell is correct that this functionality doesn't exist and so it returns false. Have you tried zoom-to-rectangle button on the plot window? That works perfectly. If you haven't yet, then refer to the matplotlib instructions on Interactive Navigation. You can zoom in using two ways: Clicking on pan/zoom button: Press the right mouse ...


0

merged['Age'] = merged['Age'].apply(lambda x: 0 if x == ' ' else x)


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You can access the filepath from your custom save method like so: self.myimg.name, where myimg is the name of your field. from django.db import models import uuid import os def img_file_path(instance, filename): ''' Creates a filepath and name for an image file. ''' ext = filename.split('.')[-1] filename = "%s.%s" % (uuid.uuid4(), ext) ...


0

What I would do is use something like: http://www.python-excel.org/. pip install xlrd xlwt xlrd - reads Excel files xlwt - writes Excel files I would then attempt something like this: import xlrd import xlwt def write_rows(batch, filename): current_batch_xls = xlwt.Workbook(encoding='utf-8') first_sheet = current_batch_xls.add_sheet(filename + ...


0

I suggest cheating and using the system find command. For example, the following finds all Python files that have been modified or created in the last 60 minutes. Using the ls output can determine if further checking is needed. $ echo beer > zoot.py $ find . -name '*.py' -mmin -60 -type f -ls 1973329 4 -rw-r--r-- 1 johnm johnm 5 Aug 30 ...


1

Check the chapter "unicode filenames" in https://docs.python.org/2/howto/unicode.html explaing this: >>> import os >>> os.path.basename(u'/a/b/c') u'c' >>> os.path.basename('/a/b/c') 'c' Anyway your fix will fail for non-ascii characters in the filename, it should be URL-encoded (urllib.urlencode)


0

Please follow the below steps to get it working: Download Dropbox SDK for Python from : https://www.dropbox.com/developers/core/sdks/python by clicking on "Download Python SDKVersion X.X.X, updated X, 20XX" Unzip downloaded folder for exmp: "dropbox-python-sdk-2.1.0" Copy the dropbox folder inside "dropbox-python-sdk-2.1.0/dropbox-python-sdk-2.1.0/" Paste ...


0

Unfortunately, I think what you're trying to do is impossible because of the evaluation order of knob expressions vs. the pixel processing expressions. tl;dr: The TCL expressions in the Expression node's knobs are being evaluated before the variables you're after are actually available. The Longer Version This glosses over or otherwise simplifies many ...


1

There are several ways to detect changes in files. Some are easier to fool than others. It doesn't sound like this is a security issue; more like good faith is assumed, and you just need to detect changes without having to outwit an adversary. You can look at timestamps. If files are not renamed, this is a good way to detect changes. If they are renamed, ...


1

Monitoring for new files isn't hard -- just keep a list or database of inodes for all files in the directory. A new file will introduce a new inode. This will also help you avoid processing renamed files, since inode doesn't change on rename. The harder problem is monitoring for file changes. If you also store file size per inode, then obviously a changed ...


0

Such functions exist. You just need to store the patches returned by hist and access the facecolor of each of them: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt n, bins, patches = plt.hist([1,2,3]) for p in patches: print p.get_facecolor() p.set_facecolor((1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0)) Output: (0.0, 0.5, 0.0, 1.0) (0.0, 0.5, 0.0, 1.0) (0.0, 0.5, 0.0, 1.0) (0.0, 0.5, ...


0

You can't use only one index, they have to be really specific to the query in order to be fast. However for most of your example queries automatic indexes will work fine, thanks to the zigzag merge join algorithm, and those don't count towards your 200 index limit. Sorting will require a custom index, but only per property, for example: Index(User, domain, ...


-1

You can use various Twitter API wrappers that are there for python. Tweepy for example is pretty straightforward. First you need to authentication yourself with OAuth to register your client application with Twitter. To do so you need to create an application in dev.twitter.com. After that you can do the authentication in this way: import tweepy # ...



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