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1

Since you haven't imported socket, your reference to socket.gethostbyname will fail with a NameError. But you're catching and silencing every single exception in your try/except block, including that very error. You should never ever do a blank except in the first place, and especially never just to have pass. Remove that try/except, or limit it to ...


1

Basically, never do this: try: something() except: pass Which is the Python equivalent of the good'ol Visual Basic anti-pattern, if you recall: On Error Resume Next Leading to unmaintainable and impossible to debug code. Simply because when a problem arises, you don't know what happened (and you don't even know that there is any problem at ...


0

try the command-line version instead of the IDE: >>> import nltk >>> nltk.download('all') Ensure that you've the latest version of NLTK because it's always improving and constantly maintain: $ pip install --upgrade nltk


-1

dictionaries do not have an append method. You can add by doing this dictBook[newKey] = value or dictBook.update(key,value) See Add to a dictionary in Python? for more info. Hope this helps.


0

There's no method to get response cookies after calling perform(). Headers sent by the server can be captured using a callback function passed to the PyCurl instance while configuring with setopt(): CURLOPT_HEADERFUNCTION Callback for writing received headers. See CURLOPT_HEADERFUNCTION Example code excerpt: set_cookies = [] # closure ...


0

+ is greedy by default. so \w+ in this (\w+)(n't)? regex matches greedily upto the n in the string can't and then it won't backtrack to get the result of can't because you make the next pattern that is (n't)? as optional. In-order to avoid this, you need to add a non-greedy quantifier ? next to the + symbol like (\w+?)(n't)? So that it would stop ...


1

Using $ means that the expression must go all the way to the end of the line (or in this case, the end of the string). (Note that in that expression the n't is optional but the $ isn't.) The \w+ can match the "n" but not the apostrophe. If the \w+ matched "can", then in order to get all the way to the end of the line, the rest of the expression (n't)?$ ...


0

I assume you use [row][column]-structure. The following piece of code should work: >>> dictionary = {'A': [True, False], 'B':[False, True], 'C':[True, True], 'D':[False, False], 'E':[False, False]} >>> itemList = list(dnaComplements.items()) >>> [x[0] for x in itemList if x[1][1] == True] will return >>> ['B', 'C'] ...


2

If you're using py2.x, reset default encoding to 'utf8': import sys reload(sys) sys.setdefaultencoding('utf8') Alternatively, you can use a ucsv module, see see Python csv library with Unicode/UTF-8 support that "just works" or use io.open(): $ echo """rt annesorose envie crêpes > envoyé jerrylee bonjour monde dimanche crepes dimanche > ...


1

You can use any row in your DataFrame df as a Boolean index for the column labels, df.columns. This returns an Index object containing only the "true" columns: >>> df.columns[df.loc[0]] Index([u'A', u'C'], dtype=object) Since this is an Index object not a Python list, you can use tolist() to turn it into one: >>> ...


0

os.system('clear') is the correct response. In addition you can run any system command using the os module,by simply printing in import os os.system('linux_command_you_want_to_run')


0

Provided the inner elements are valid JSON, the following could work. I dug up the source of simplejson library and modified it to suit your use case. An SSCCE is below. import re import simplejson FLAGS = re.VERBOSE | re.MULTILINE | re.DOTALL WHITESPACE = re.compile(r'[ \t\n\r]*', FLAGS) def grabJSON(s): """Takes the largest bite of JSON from the ...


0

This is actually due to savefig's defaults. The figure can have a transparent background (e.g. try fig.patch.set(facecolor='none'); fig.canvas.print_png), but it's being overridden when you call plt.savefig. If you want a transparent background, you'll need to specify transparent=True in your call to savefig. Otherwise, it will override the figure's ...


2

Try using slice() instead of range() mySlice=slice(1,2) a='0123456789' a[mySlice] will give you '1'


2

Will slice do instead of range? If so, you can use it: >>> a = '0123456789' >>> a[slice(1, 2)] '1'


0

replace "," with ":" in this syntax. For instance: a = "0123456789" a[1:2]


0

Call os.startfile(): Start a file with its associated application. import os filename = "C:/Users/first.last/Desktop/image.JPG" os.startfile(filename) Also see more options at: Open document with default application in Python


0

I do not have enough reputation points to comment yet, so i answer then instead. According the Sympy doc's. Sympy.printing.mathml's mathml function is expecting a expression. But in string format? http://docs.sympy.org/dev/modules/printing.html#sympy.printing.mathml.mathml Code part: def mathml(expr, **settings): """Returns the MathML representation ...


0

Just add a db_column='' to your foreign keys: sender = ForeignKeyField(Employee, db_column='sender', # Added this. related_name='messages', to_field='email') # was CharField() before my edit


1

One way to ensure you can see the result in the error message is to use repr, or more directly %r rather than %s: that never fails (because any object has a representation, and all representations are in ASCII including possibly escape sequences), and also shows (as escape sequences) characters that might otherwise be invisible. repr (and '%r' in old-style ...


0

You can map each letter to another letter. You probably need not create translation table with all possible combination. >>> M = {'A':'T', 'T':'A', 'C':'G', 'G':'C'} >>> STR = 'CGAATT' >>> S = "".join([M.get(c,c) for c in STR]) >>> S 'GCTTAA' How this works: # this returns a list of char according to your dict M ...


0

t1 = "26-12-2014 17:00" t2 = "27-12-2014 08:00" from datetime import datetime t1 = datetime.strptime(t1,"%d-%m-%Y %H:%M") t2 = datetime.strptime(t2,"%d-%m-%Y %H:%M") hours, rem = divmod((t2- t1).seconds,3600) minutes = rem / 60 print("Total hours = {}, minutes = {}".format(hours, minutes))


1

The DateRangeFilter provided by django-filter allows you to filter across common date ranges like "today", "the past week", "last month", etc. It does not allow you to filter a queryset down to a specific date. You should be able to do this with a custom filter though. from django_filters.filters import DateFilter class WithinDateFilter(DateFilter): ...


3

For a problem like this, you can use string.maketrans (str.maketrans in Python 3) combined with str.translate: import string table = string.maketrans('CGAT', 'GCTA') print 'GCTTAA'.translate(table) # outputs CGAATT


4

That is not a good idea: you'd have to modify python's built-in code and libraries. I do not even know if they are compiled but if they weren't, even though you'd be able to modify the code (which I do not know if that is possible in the simple way we assume it) you would run into trouble: You may screw up any other part of the code by which python won't ...


1

You need to join root with f to get proper file path using os.path.join: for root, sub, files in os.walk(r_dir): files = sorted(files) for f in files: s_rate, x = scipy.io.wavfile.read(os.path.join(root, f)) # <--- rate.append(s_rate) data.append(x)


1

Just add os.chdir(root) in for loop as: for f in files: os.chdir(root) # move to the directory where files are present s_rate, x = scipy.io.wavfile.read(f) rate.append(s_rate) data.append(x) Another way is to join file name with its path using os.psth.join() as: for f in files: s_rate, x = ...


1

.write is a method, not an attribute, so you should do variable.write("anything you want") and not `variable.write = "anything you want". Python wouldn't be able to change the content if you do not call a function. So instead of doing: class simpleTelnet(logger): def __init__(self): print 'Inside simpleTelnt Constructor' ...


0

I would say it would depend. Really it depends on what program you are using to run your program. For example if you ran a program with the Python IDE, this is what you get: Traceback (most recent call last): File "C:/Python27/idontcare.py", line 1, in <module> print qwerfghnjm NameError: name 'qwerfghnjm' is not defined Just a error that only ...


5

It's because in Python 3, the filter function returns an iterator. Use list(my_new_list) to get all the results. To be clear, it's not that filter "doesn't work", but that it's behavior is different in Python 3.x compared to 2.x. See How to use Filter, Map, and Reduce in Python 3.3.0 for a previous answer. The reasoning behind this is that if you have a ...


6

The difference in output is caused by the fact that filter returns an iterator in Python 3.x. So, you need to manually call list() on it in order to get a list: >>> my_list = [2,9,10,15,21,30,33,45] >>> filter(lambda x: x % 3 == 0, my_list) <filter object at 0x01ACAB50> >>> list(filter(lambda x: x % 3 == 0, my_list)) [9, ...


0

This is architecture dependent and recent generations have improved things significantly. On the older Core2 architecture on the other hand: $ gcc -O3 -fno-inline foo2.c -o a; ./a 1000000 Array Size: 3.815 MB Trial 1 _mm_load_ps with aligned memory: 0.003983 _mm_loadu_ps with aligned memory: 0.003889 _mm_loadu_ps with unaligned ...


1

Install tcpflow Run the given script import os INTERFACE = "lo" PORT = "30003" os.system("tcpflow -i %s port %s" % (INTERFACE, PORT)) It will write the requests which are coming to the port into a file like 127.000.000.001.06080-127.000.000.001.6347 in script's location


3

Read the error: self.label.destroy() AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'destroy' This means that self.label is None, so you can't destroy it. You could fix this by doing the same thing as you do later in the code, and checking if it is None before you destroy it: if row is None: if self.label: self.label.destroy() if ...


0

You'll need to write a custom filter function. A working example: from bs4 import BeautifulSoup import re data = '''<span> <style>.vAnH{display:none}.vsP6{display:inline}</style> <span class="vAnH">34</span> <span /> <span style="display: inline">111</span> <span ...


0

If you put them together, then the file won't be closed automatically -- but that often doesn't really matter, since it will be closed automatically when the script terminates. It's not common to need to reference the raw file once acsv.readerinstance has been created from (except possibly to explicitly close it if you're not using awithstatement). If ...


1

Assuming data is a JSON object not an array, the response is being translated into a Python dictionary. Iterating over a dictionary returns the keys, not the values. This means that you try to access the attribute item on a string (and strings in Python don't have an "item" attribute). There are several ways you could fix this: {# 1. Use the key to ...


2

If you don't want to go the Selenium way, you can get something with BeautifulSoup: from bs4 import BeautifulSoup def is_visible_span_or_div(tag, is_parent=False): """ This function checks if the element is a span or a div, and if it is visible. If so, it recursively checks all the parents and returns False is one of them is hidden """ # ...


0

You might want to study the possibilities of making a decorator out of bar: def bar(helper): def process(): print('preprocessing...') # Anything you need to do prior to calling the helper function helper() return process @bar def helper_function_1(): print('helper 1') @bar def helper_function_2(): print('helper 2') ...


2

You'll have to put it in a big list in order to get it work. i.e. [ {key1: val1, key2: val2, key3: val3, ...keyN: valN} , {key1: val1, key2: val2, key3: val3, ...keyN: valN} , {key1: val1, key2: val2, key3: val3, ...keyN: valN} . . . ] If you can't change the data file format, I'm afraid you'll have to roll your own function to ...


6

The .split("_")[0] part should be inside a single-argument function that you pass as the second argument to itertools.groupby. >>> import os, itertools >>> test = ['abc_1_2', 'abc_2_2', 'hij_1_1', 'xyz_1_2', 'xyz_2_2'] >>> [list(g) for _, g in itertools.groupby(test, lambda x: x.split('_')[0])] [['abc_1_2', 'abc_2_2'], ...


2

There are multiple ways to make a node visible/hidden for the end user in the browser. BeautifulSoup is an HTML Parser, it doesn't know if an element would be shown or not. Though, there was an attempt here: BeautifulSoup Grab Visible Webpage Text It would not work if, for example, an element is hidden by a CSS rule, but might work for your use case. ...


1

Your issue appears to be in this line: for i, opt in enumerate(s2option_list3): When you use enumerate like that, it is overwriting your value for i (-1 at the time) with the index of the enumeration (0 for the first option and 1 for the second). I'm not sure why you are trying to use the enumeration at all. Without giving you too much advice on how to ...


0

if len(a) == 0: print 'List a is currently empty!' That piece of code means that if the list a has nothing in it, it will print List a is currently empty!. len() function helps the user or programmer to see how much items there are in the list. In your case, there is nothing in the list, so len(a) == 0.


4

l1[:][0] = 888 first takes a slice of all the elements in l1 (l1[:]), which (as per list semantics) returns a new list object containing all the objects in l1 -- it's a shallow copy of l1. It then replaces the first element of that copied list with the integer 888 ([0] = 888). Then, the copied list is discarded because nothing is done with it. Your second ...


10

This is caused by python's feature that allows you to assign a list to a slice of another list, i.e. l1= [1,2,3,4] l1[:2] = [9, 8] print l1 will set l1's first two values to 9 and 8 respectively. Similarly, l1[:]= [9, 8, 7, 6] assigns new values to all elements of l1. More info about assignments in the docs.


2

with open(file, 'rb') as readerfile: The first line opens the file and stores the file object in readerfile. The with statement ensures that the file is closed when you exit the block by any means, including exceptions. reader = csv.reader(readerfile) The second line creates a CSV reader object using the file object. It needs the file object ...


1

This is not recommended at all Why is it important to use one line? Most python programmers know well the benefits of using the with statement. Keep in mind that readers might be lazy (that is -read line by line-) on some cases. You want to be able to handle the file with the correct statement, ensuring the correct closing, even if errors arise. ...


1

So basically you want a one-liner? reader = csv.reader(open(file, 'rb')) As said before, the problem with that is with open() allows you to do the following steps in one time: Open the file Do what you want with the file (inside your open block) Close the file (that is implicit and you don't have to specify it) If you don't use with open but directly ...


3

You can do: reader = csv.reader(open(file, 'rb')) but that would mean you are not closing your file explicitly.



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