Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

import random ... time.sleep(random.choice(range(12,31,2)))


-1

Your code will throw a memory error with big numbers (ex: 1e9) since you define a huge list array = [i for i in range(2,n+1)]. I would suggest an other way more sophisticated: import math def prime(limit): count = 3 while True: isprime = True for x in range(2, int(math.sqrt(count) + 1)): if count % x == 0: ...


0

Why not just put a random number into your sleep()? Google will probably catch on to your sequence method. from random import randint # ..your code.. time.sleep(randint(10, 30)) Now each request will sleep for a random amount of time, much harder to detect.


1

Whenever U create ur connection to mongo DB, you have to fill out "DB" parameter" asyncio_mongo.Connection.create('hostname', 'port', username="user", password="password", db='PUT YOUR DB NAME HERE')


-1

Didn't run the code. It should work, but change where it is needed. I just posted it to give you the intuition. def primes(n): array = [1 for i in range(0,n)] array[0] = 0 array[1] = 0 p = 2 while p <= n: i = 2*p while i <= n: array[i] = 0 i += p p += 1 while (array[p] ...


0

If you don't mind having all floats: with open("in.txt") as f: data = [list(map(float, line.strip("[]\n").split(","))) for line in f] print(data) [[0.0, 0.0, 0.0], [0.0, 2.0, 1.0], [0.0, 1.0, 4.0]] Or using re: import re with open("in.txt") as f: r = re.compile("\d+\.\d+|\d+") data = [list(map(float, r.findall(line)))for line in f] ...


0

For each line in the text file, you first need to get rid of the square braces, then you split the string on ", " (mid the space here), Then after splitting you get a list of strings then you need to convert those strings to floats, for which you can use map() function. data = [] with open("sample.txt", "r") as data_file: for line in ...


-1

Since your data is in the same format as when a list of floats is printed as a string, you can use ast.literal_eval method to convert it back to the actual list, like this >>> import ast >>> with open("coords.txt") as input_file: ... result = [ast.literal_eval(line) for line in input_file] ... >>> result [[0, 0.0, 0.0], ...


-1

from collections import defaultdict import csv ret = defaultdict([]) f = open("in.csv") fread = csv.reader(f) for r in fread: ret[r[0]].append("{}, {} ".format(r[1], r[2])) res = ["{} {}".format(k, "".join(ret[k])) for k in ret] print res f.close()


0

Is this what you want? You can add means after transformation. df = pd.DataFrame({'value': [1, 2, 15, 3, 7, 1, 3, 8, 5, 3, 1, 1, 8, 5, 19]}, index=pd.DatetimeIndex(['2000-01-01', '2000-03-01', '2000-06-01', '2000-09-01', '2000-12-01', '2001-01-01', '2001-03-01', '2001-06-01', ...


0

For the first, I don't see why this would be a problem. What is it you're trying to solve here? Why do you need the ID list ordered? Anyways, to always get the list ordered by IDs, you can simply use the order_by on your query, to always return the list ordered by the ID number: qs = ...


0

The default encoding on Python2 is Ascii, on Python3, it is UTF8.


0

This problem would be easy to solve with an OrderedDefaultdict from another answer of mine (shown below). It would the be equally easy to output the values associated with each theater location. import collections import csv class OrderedDefaultdict(collections.OrderedDict): def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs): if not args: ...


0

First of all, that rap lyrics generator does not seem very impressive to me, it just selects lines from different songs and shuffles them such that they rhyme. The article even says that the resulting poem doesn't make any sense. I don't know why they even had to use machine learning for it... In my opinion, there is much more impressive similar work out ...


0

You can have the following pattern: url(r'^resource/(?P<clientId>[A-Za-z0-9]*)/(?P<token>[A-Za-z0-9]*)$', RestResource.as_view()), And the RestResource class can look something like this: class RestResource(View): def put(self, request, clientId, token): # Your code here return HttpResponse(json.dumps(JSON_DATA_VARIABLE), ...


0

Adding below 3 lines into your code will solve your problem. import sys reload(sys) sys.setdefaultencoding('utf8')


1

from collections import defaultdict # rows containing your data rows = ... byLocation = defaultdict(list) for row in rows: byLocation[row[0]].append(row[1:])


0

This is because your program met non-ascii characters while running. I assume you are using python 2.x since python 3 doesn't have this kind of issue. The solution is to add below 3 lines into your code: import sys reload(sys) sys.setdefaultencoding('utf8')


0

I just found the answer. In essence, this stems from not understanding the python installation layout and how resources are separated between installed interpreters. It appears each python version will have its own repository of tools, and the current "pip" command I had installed on the system was mapped for use with python 2.7, so all libraries, tools, and ...


1

Not sure what you plan on doing with the columns but this will group the elements by location from collections import OrderedDict od = OrderedDict() import csv with open("in.csv") as f,open("new.csv" ,"w") as out: r = csv.reader(f) wr= csv.writer(out) header = next(r) for row in r: loc,*rest = row od.setdefault(loc, ...


0

Found the problem. Neither of the properties sender_can_delete or sender_can_edit were set on the template. I corrected the settings on the template and now the recipient modify and recipient delete work as intended via the REST api. In the API response to get recipient status there are two key/values that indicate the lock status of the signer: ...


0

Try setting your user agent before executing any requests br = mechanize.Browser() #Change the 2nd tuple entry to your particular user agent, you can check it in http://whatsmyuseragent.com/ br.addheaders = [('User-agent', 'Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/42.0.2311.135 Safari/537.36')]


0

By using a fork of multiprocessing called pathos.multiprocessing, this can be really easy… and can be done quite naturally from the interpreter. I will also leverage pox, which has some filesystem utilities that are in addition to those in the os and sys modules. Let's first check out the test files that I've set up. There are several files in each ...


0

A simple but perhaps not the most efficient way would be to use cv.drawContours and cv.line to create two images: one with the contour of the blob and one with the contour of the line. Then cv.bitwise_and them together, and any point that is still positive will be points of intersection.


0

One way to do it is to have the configurations defined in a class or a simple dict: class Config(object): setting1 = "default_value" setting2 = "default_value" @staticmethod def load_config(json_file): """ load settings from config file """ with open(json_file) as f: config = json.load(f) for k, v in ...


0

This one is easier to understand: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = [1,2,3] plt.subplot(211) plt.plot(x, label="test1") plt.plot([3,2,1], label="test2") plt.legend(bbox_to_anchor=(0, 1), loc='upper left', ncol=1) plt.show() now play with the to coordinates (x,y). For loc you can use: valid locations are: right center left upper right lower right best ...


0

Go into your virtual environment. Your file name is requirements.txt You need to type in the terminal pip install -r requirements.txt This should install all the packages listed in your requirements.txt In case when some of your modules failed to install you have to manually install them.


0

Try this: import matplotlib import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib.ticker as mticker import matplotlib.dates as mdates import numpy as np import pylab pylab.show() from matplotlib import style style.use("ggplot") def graphRawFX(): date,bid,ask = np.loadtxt('XAUUSDS.txt', unpack=True, ...


3

You have to build the dictionaries and sub-dictionaries yourself from rows returned from csv.reader which are sequences, instead of using csv.DictReader. Fortunately that's fairly easy: import csv from collections import OrderedDict filename = 'test.csv' aDict = OrderedDict() with open(filename, 'rb') as f: csvReader = csv.reader(f) fields = ...


0

I think I have found a way. I can override save_model method of ModelAdmin and do the following... class ArticleAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): def save_model(self, request, obj, form, change): if request.user in permited user: obj.save() else: raise forms.ValidationError("you can't do that.")


0

I recommend using urlparse which is written specifically for parsing URL(s) into their components. from urlparse import urlparse for component in soup.fetchall('a'): try: link = urlparse.urlparse(component['href'].lower()) except: pass else: print link Also, I don't fully understand what the point of 'depth' is, I ...


0

To my knowledge, there is no builtin filter for that in Jinja2 neither among Ansible's extra filters, but it's not a big deal to make your own: certs = {'.*thinking.*': 'akash', '.*sleeping.*': 'akashthakur'} def map_regex(value, mapping=certs): for k, v in mapping.items(): if re.match(k, value): return v Then you'll need to add a ...


1

This is one way: import csv from collections import OrderedDict filename = "test.csv" aDict = OrderedDict() with open(filename, 'r') as f: order = next(f).strip().split(',')[1:] f.seek(0) csvReader = csv.DictReader(f) for row in csvReader: key = row.pop("key") aDict[key] = OrderedDict((k, row[k]) for k in order)


1

The easiest method that you can use is to get the year's data with partial string indexing df1['1991'] This is described in the pandas documentation under 17.4.1 DatetimeIndex Partial String Indexing. With this method, you can cut out the creation of the timedelta, the second date_range, and the complex and erroneous slicing In[15]: df1['1990'].index ...


2

I updated my pandas to '0.16.1' and now I am having no problems. Thanks for you help @Wajdi Farhani


0

csv.DictReader loads the rows into a regular dict and not an ordered one. You'll have to read the csv manually into an OrderedDict to get the order you need: from collections import OrderedDict filename = "test.csv" dictRows = [] with open(filename, 'r') as f: rows = (line.strip().split(',') for line in f) # read column names from first row ...


1

You could use .ix to filter dr dates from df1 In [107]: df1.ix[dr] Out[107]: 0 1991-01-31 -1.239096 1992-01-31 0.153730 1993-01-31 -0.685778 1994-01-31 0.132170 1995-01-31 0.154965 1996-01-31 1.800437 1997-01-31 2.725209 1998-01-31 -0.084751 1999-01-31 1.604511 2000-01-31 NaN Even df1.loc[dr] works. Also, for this case, ...


0

The Problem was, I was not using the render function, which includes the requestContext parameter, I was missing. Now everything works fine. Thanks alot for support.


1

This code is where the problem lies: self.calculatebutton = Button(root,text="Calculate",width=10) self.calculatebutton.bind("<Button-1>",self.clear) self.calculatebutton.bind("<Button-1>",self.calculate) When you call bind, it will replace any previous binding of the same event to the same widget. So, the binding to self.clear goes away when ...


0

You don't need to import datetime or timedelta to do this. df['DTDate'] = pd.to_datetime(df['DTDate']) # can skip this if column 'DTDate' is already of the right type x.weekday() extracts the day of the week with Monday=0 and Sunday=6. df['newDate'] = df.DTDate.apply(lambda x: x + pd.DateOffset(days=7-x.weekday()) if x.weekday() else x) yields: ...


1

The default Django project layout changed in Django 1.4. For the directory layout you have shown you should use books instead of mysite.books in your INSTALLED_APPS.


1

Try to put books without the prefix mysite.


1

I agree with Mike that map(lambda is silly. In this case, '{}{}'.format pretty much does the job your lambda is supposed to do, so you can use that instead: starmap('{}{}'.format, v) That uses itertools.starmap. If you want to use map, you can do it like this: map('{}{}'.format, *zip(*v)) But really I'd just do (c + str(n) for c, n in v) Edit: A ...


0

If you do this: import numpy as np def my_func(k): return 3.15 + k*12**45+16 arr = np.array(([12,45,45],[12,88,63])) print (arr) arr = my_func(arr) print (arr) you get this: [[12 45 45] [12 88 63]] [[4.388714385610605e+49 1.6457678946039768e+50 1.6457678946039768e+50] [4.388714385610605e+49 3.218390549447777e+50 2.3040750524455676e+50]]


0

dep_resolve(edge) Is a call to a method of the same class, so it needs a reference to the class instance ('self'): self.dep_resolve(edge)


3

You would pass the recursive call on to the next node, so call the method on that node: def dep_resolve(node): print (node.name) for edge in node.edges: print(edge.name) edge.dep_resolve() Note that you really want to use the name self instead; it is what every other Python developer uses: def dep_resolve(self): print ...


2

request.session is a basically a Python mapping just like a dictionary, and it supports all dictionary methods. Like dict.update() to set multiple key-value pairs: self.request.session.update({ 'path_one_images': PATH_ONE_IMAGES, 'images': images, 'slider_DV_values': slider_DV_values, 'instruction_task_one_images': ...


0

The cron job hits a handler, and this handler starts a task. This process usually takes less than a second. After that the task can run for as long as you need it - forever, if necessary. It all depends on the target of a task. 10 minute limitation applies to front-end (F-type) instances only. And you can run many tasks concurrently if necessary.


0

You could use another list comprehension: >>> [''.join((x, str(y))) for x, y in v] ['a1', 'a2', 'a3', 'a4', 'b1', 'b2', 'b3', 'b4', 'c1', 'c2', 'c3', 'c4'] If you don't need v, you can do in the first list comprehension: >>> [''.join((x, str(y))) for x in ['a','b','c'] for y in range(1,5)] ['a1', 'a2', 'a3', 'a4', 'b1', 'b2', 'b3', ...


1

you know this is wrong syntax for a dict, yes? {['path_one_images'] : PATH_ONE_IMAGES} ...should be {'path_one_images': PATH_ONE_IMAGES, etc} https://docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#dict this explains the error you're getting ("unhashable type: 'list'")... Python thinks you're trying to use a list ['path_one_images'] as the dict key. Dict keys ...



Top 50 recent answers are included