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This is exactly what the __new__ method is for. In Python, creating an object actually has two steps. In pseudocode: value = the_class.__new__(the_class, *args, **kwargs) if isinstance(value, the_class): value.__init__(*args, **kwargs) The two steps are called construction and initialization. Most types don't need anything fancy in construction, so ...


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Instead of __init__ try new: def __new__(cls, value, flags): obj = str.__new__(cls, value) obj.flags = flags return obj


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I wrote a simple python script for this similar task to send multiple network requests to google Mobile-Friendly Test api and save "pass" and some other fields to mysql db. It's very fast and efficient. # download mysql connector for python # from: https://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/odbc/ # select your Platform from drop-down and install it ...


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Google.com tries to redirect you to regional domain. socket package doesn't support HTTP-redirects (you should implement them yourself). The simplest solution is to install Requests library: pip install requests It's really easy to make HTTP-requests with this library: import requests site = raw_input("\nEnter the site from which you want to receive data ...


2

I'm willing to bet the problem is that you're mixing up NumPy arrays and normal Python lists. You're using NumPy arrays all over your code. These know how to do all kinds of cool things, like element-wise operations. For example: >>> a = np.array([1, 2, 3, 4]) >>> a * 1.5 array([ 1.5, 3. , 4.5, 6. ]) But Python lists don't know how ...


-1

I know that it is old question, but i have the same problem. Did you solve it? Thanks.


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This is documented on Heroku Devecenter # Parse database configuration from $DATABASE_URL import dj_database_url # DATABASES['default'] = dj_database_url.config() #updated DATABASES = {'default': dj_database_url.config(default='postgres://user:pass@localhost/dbname')} If you need Database connection pooling add this bits too. More details # Enable ...


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First, you read the Linux directions, instead of the OS X directions. There is generally no such thing as python-dev on Macs. Second, you didn't read them correctly. Even if you're on Linux, you install python-dev with apt-get or yum or urpmi or some similar system-packages tool, not with pip. Third, you didn't read the output correctly. You're ignoring ...


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Integer indices are not allowed. To get it working you can declare the DICT as specified below: VarName = {} Hope this works for you.


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For the example code Tablero = array('b'[Boardsize, Boardsize]) TypeError: string indices must be integers Integer indices are not allowed. To get it working you can declare the DICT as specified below: Tablero = {} Tablero = array('b'[Boardsize, Boardsize]) TypeError: string indices must be integers Hope this works for you.


-1

I think, pip is under root owner. Try this... sudo su Give the password and enter. Terminal will sign as root and then command your installed sudo commands.


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This issue is caused by using Autobahn previous version. This issue resolved after installing Autobahn test suite latest version v0.7.1.


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I'm not really sure what it is you're trying to accomplish. Looks like you're trying to pass some number of arguments of length N to a function that defines a truth table for those arguments, then print its result for each function. That shouldn't be TOO tough. from itertools import product def truthtable(num_args, fn): header = [["arg{}".format(i) for ...


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I have a more compact function. import itertools scores = {} for a,b in itertools.permutations(('human', 'loud', 'big'), 2): scores["{0} + {1}".format(a,b)] = 0 print scores


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You gave the actual byte values as: (239, 191, 189) This is U+FFFD, the unicode replacement character: http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/0fffd/index.htm My guess is you've written a bad character to the file that your editor is incapable of displaying or editing (as you explained by the weird behavior when adding/removing characters at the end ...


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If you want to gather the results into a list, you just create a list and append each one onto it: numbers = [1, 2, 3] doubles = [] for number in numbers: double = number * 2 doubles.append(double) … or, more compactly, do the same with a list comprehension: numbers = [1, 2, 3] doubles = [number * 2 for number in numbers]


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Create new List type variable result and add values into it by list append() method. Demo: >>> numbers = [1, 2, 3] >>> result = [] >>> for i in numbers: ... result.append(i*2) ... >>> result [2, 4, 6] >>>


0

You need enumerate function to update numbers of the list. numbers = [1, 2, 3] for index, number in enumerate(numbers): numbers[index] = number * 2 print numbers


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Use a list comprehension: [num*2 for num in numbers] >>> numbers = [1, 2, 3] >>> [num*2 for num in numbers] [2, 4, 6] >>>


0

you need both checks, sort of... the first one is clearly not enough since you can have len(depths)==2 and the difference between the two >1. the 2nd condition, as it is written, can only work if len(depth) is exactly 2. you could have only this latter condition but then you'd need to iterate over all items in the depth list. so basically it is ...


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This isn't a solution, but it's as much as I could do to get it started: string1 = ["1.10","1.1","1.23","2.2","2.20"] for x in string1: if x.find('0') > 0: place = string1.index(x) string1.remove(x) string1.insert(place+1, x) print (string1) The only problem it's having now is as the list iterates, it keeps going over the ...


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#include "Python.h" int main() { Py_Initialize(); PyRun_SimpleString("import sys"); PyRun_SimpleString("sys.path.append(\"<some_path>\")"); return 0; } This worked for all python version (2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4). Several notes regarding <some_path>: It should contain only a single directory. List of directories with valid ...


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This solution should be faster for large numbers. def solution(number): number -= 1 a, b, c = number // 3, number // 5, number // 15 asum, bsum, csum = a*(a+1) // 2, b*(b+1) // 2, c*(c+1) // 2 return 3*asum + 5*bsum - 15*csum Explanation: Take any sequence from 1 to n: 1, 2, 3, 4, ..., n And it's sum will always be given by the ...


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From Wikipedia: In November 2003, UTF-8 was restricted by RFC 3629 to end at U+10FFFF, in order to match the constraints of the UTF-16 character encoding. The character you're trying to decode is outside of this range. Specifically it's U+150410.


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Django does now support models in subfolders without needing to specify the Meta class and app_label but it's still python and doesn't magically load all modules in the models folder. You still need to import your models into your app/models/__init__.py.


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Use itertools.combinations: from itertools import combinations as comb l = ['human', 'loud', 'big'] scores = dict((" + ".join(pair), 0) for ordered_pair in comb(l, 2) for pair in (ordered_pair, reversed(ordered_pair)))


1

I'm pretty sure the answer is, as explained in Scalars, that: Array scalars have the same attributes and methods as ndarrays. [1] This allows one to treat items of an array partly on the same footing as arrays, smoothing out rough edges that result when mixing scalar and array operations. So, if it's acceptable to call bool on a scalar, it must be ...


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Here's my snippet that worked. I recommend creating the dictionary and then just adding to it. scores = {} lst = ('human', 'loud', 'big') for words in list: first = words for words in list: if words != first: scores.update({first + " + " + words: 0}) print scores I'd recommend changing some ...


0

You had the right idea - here's your basic logic with the syntax fixed. The two primary changes are: 1) you need to name the iterator variable in your inner loop something different than the iterator variable in your outer loop, otherwise the scopes will conflict, and 2) to add things to dictionaries, use the [key] index notation rather than trying to create ...


1

Try the following: lst = ('human', 'loud', 'big') scores = {} for f in lst: for s in lst: if f != s: scores['{0} + {1}'.format(f, s)] = 0 print scores As such: >>> lst = ('human', 'loud', 'big') >>> scores = {} >>> for f in lst: ... for s in lst: ... if f != s: ... scores['{0} + ...


1

You have a syntax issue with the dictionary assignment line, but the more important issue is that you're re-assigning the dictionary every time. Instead, create the dictionary at the start and then just add to it. Finally list is not a good variable name because it collides with the name of the type. mylist = ('human', 'loud', 'big') scores = {} for w in ...


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With Python 2.7.9 (and probably all Python's prior to 3.x), this does what you expect: #!/usr/bin/python import sys while True: line=sys.stdin.readline() if not line: break print line You can also do: #!/usr/bin/python import sys for line in iter(sys.stdin.readline, ''): print line On Python 3.4.3, you can do what abarnert ...


2

You only have two values per row in your list so you need to tell the INSERT INTO statement to expect only two values rather than four: cursor.executemany("INSERT INTO contacts VALUES (?,?)", list)


1

The current most upvoted answer does not actually answer the question as it does not print the output as it streams. Something like the code below should do what you want: import sys def readline(): while True: res = sys.stdin.readline() if not res: break yield res for line in readline(): print line Here, ...


1

Numpy seems to be following the same castings as builtin python**, in this context it seems to be because of which return true for calls to nonzero. Apparently len can also be used, but here, none of these arrays are empty (length 0) - so that's not directly relevant. Note that calling bool([False]) also returns True according to these rules. a = ...


0

Here is some sample code for you class Test(): def __init__(self,q): self.Quantity = q def __repr__(self): return "<Class Test: Quantity=" + str(self.Quantity) + ">" mydict = mydict = {"a":[ Test(3), Test(2), Test(4)], "b": [Test(8), Test(10), Test(6)], "c":[Test(14), Test(12), Test(20)]} print "Before Sort" for key in mydict: ...


1

They don't make this obvious from the website, but from the docs: If you need to distribute your application for more than one OS, for example both Windows and Mac OS X, you must install PyInstaller on each platform and bundle your app separately on each. So you'll need to package it on a Mac, sorry.


1

You wrote "I've written a code to do this, but do not like the need of creating a separate list, and appending items to that list, and would rather just remove items from the original list." I assumed that to mean deleting items from the original list, so I wrote a solution which deletes entire slices from the list. Using a list comprehension is just another ...


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The first problem is that readlines reads all the lines into a list. It can't do that until all of the lines are present, which won't be until stdin has reached EOF. But you don't actually need a list of the lines, just some iterable of the lines. And a file, like sys.stdin, already is such an iterable. And it's a lazy one, that generates one line at a time ...


2

It may seem heavy-weight at first, but the argparse module can do exactly what you want. The first example on the page shows an integer-only argument (notice the type=int part): parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='Process some integers.') parser.add_argument('integers', metavar='N', type=int, nargs='+', help='an integer for the ...


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To parse command line arguments, you should be using argparse. import argparse def main(): parser = argparse.ArgumentParser() parser.add_argument("-n", type=int) args = parser.parse_args() print args if __name__ == '__main__': main() Usage: [10:39pm][wlynch@watermelon /tmp] python blah.py Namespace(n=None) ...


1

how about this: def unloop(ls): return [x for i,x in enumerate(ls) if not set(ls[:i]).intersection(set(ls[i:]))] explanation: take item x at position i from ls if the intersection of items [0..i-1] and [i..n] is empty i.e. no element appears both before and after x. it works for the 3 examples you supplied, might need to test it for edge cases


0

The following works in Python 3: >>> my_list = [('aaa',2), ('BBB',7), ('ccc',0)] >>> my_list.sort(key=lambda elem: elem[0].lower()) >>> print(my_list) [('aaa', 2), ('BBB', 7), ('ccc', 0)] The function argument unpacking doesn't work in Python 3 (as you have discovered), but from the phrasing of the question it looks like you ...


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Use str.isdigit(): >>> '12345'.isdigit() True >>> '12.345'.isdigit() False If you want to support negative numbers, strip the sign off first: >>> '+12345'.strip(' -+').isdigit() True >>> '-12345'.strip(' -+').isdigit() True


0

You could perhaps do something like this: from math import modf if modf(float(args.n))[0] != 0.0: # ERROR: Float entered! From the math.modf docs: math.modf(x)¶ Return the fractional and integer parts of x. Both results carry the sign of x and are floats. Or alternatively (as @dawg mentioned): "." in args.n # A possible float # or ...


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Seems to me the problem lies in the scripting on the target page. The js-driven content is rendered in here (especially i found calls to mediawiki). So, you need to look at web sniffer to identify it: What to do? If you want to retrieve the whole page content, you better plugin any of libraries working out (evaluating) in page javascript. Read more here. ...


0

Simply removing the python symlink from ~/miniconda3/bin/ appears to do the job. $ which python /home/naught101/miniconda3/bin/python $ rm /home/naught101/miniconda3/bin/python $ which python /usr/bin/python $ source activate science discarding /home/naught101/miniconda3/bin from PATH prepending ...


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You're right that this is a Python 2 thing, but the fix is pretty simple: list.sort(key=lambda a: (a[0].lower(), a[1])) That doesn't really seem any less clear, because the names a and b don't have any more inherent meaning than a[0] and a[1]. (If they were, say, name and score or something, that might be a different story…) Python 2 allowed you to ...


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Don't run with a space between the directory and the filename: python /root/Desktop/1 hello.py Use a / instead: python /root/Desktop/1/hello.py



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