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0

I ran into this problem as well on Win7. For me, Anaconda was installed in C:\Users\me\AppData\Local\Contunuum\Anaconda, instead of C:\Anaconda. Adding that, along with C:\Users\me\AppData\Local\Contunuum\Anaconda\Scripts to my Path solved the problem for me.


0

If: first = """This page can't be saved. Some required information is missing.""" second = "This page can't be saved.\n Some required information is missing." assert first == second fails, then the problem is probably that: first == "This page can't be saved.\nSome required information is missing." second == "This page can't be saved.\n Some required ...


0

Try this: import collections plist = ('burleson both', 'the largemouth', 'the largemouth', 'a 19inch', 'his first') counts = collections.Counter(plist) print counts # Counter({'the largemouth': 2, 'a 19inch': 1, 'burleson both': 1, 'his first': 1})


0

Why do you want to append them to the list and to the whole transformation again? Just do new_vectors = vectorizer.transform([title1, title2])


0

From looking at the ssl module, most of the relevant magic happens in the SSLSocket class. ssl.wrap_socket() is just a tiny convenience function that basically serves as a factory for an SSLSocket with some reasonable defaults, and wraps an existing socket. Unfortunately, SSLSocket does not seem to do any logging of its own, so there's no easy way to turn ...


1

OK, you have two problems. First, when you go to do your indentation, you write: print('',end='') In python (and other languages), '' is an empty string. You should use ' '. Second, your x incrementing logic seems to be wrong. Simply adding 2 each loop works fine, making your program: def holidaybush(n): z=n-1 x=1 for i in range(0,n): ...


0

You could use where and the modulo operator. MyModel.objects.extra(where=["id %% 100 == 0"]).values_list('id', flat=True) The double % is because we need to escape it as it's a reserved character for parameters.


0

I have an alternative which uses try/except KeyError: # by the way, you missed the { score = { "a": 1, "c": 3, "b": 3, "e": 1, "d": 2, "g": 2, "f": 4, "i": 1, "h": 4, "k": 5, "j": 8, "m": 3, "l": 1, "o": 1, "n": 1, "q": 10, "p": 3, "s": 1, "r": 1, "u": 1, "t": 1, "w": 4, "v": 4, "y": 4, "x": 8, "z": 10 } def check_score(word): ...


0

Both queries are executed. The problem is that you never read the results of the first query. (Executing another query resets the cursor.)


0

Use scipy.linalg.eig, which will solve ordinary or generalized eigenvalue problems.


1

You've already identified the problem: the emails have ^M characters in them that you're not expecting. (CR LF is a common line ending convention; Unix usually does not like the CR). Try removing "\r" from your command: command = command.translate(None, "\r"). I also urge you to carefully consider the security implications of running whatever commands are ...


0

You won't get any more parallelism than the number of cores/threads in your CPU. If you're getting a 3x speed up on a 4 core machine, that's pretty good. You've only got a slight overhead. I would suggest that on a 4 core machine you set "number of parallel processes" to 4 to reduce the overhead. Now, if you're running that on a 16 core machine, a speed up ...


0

You should look into pyttsx module , it supports text to speech engines on Mac OSX, Windows, and Linux . Example usage: import pyttsx engine = pyttsx.init() engine.say('Sally sells seashells by the seashore.') engine.say('The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.') engine.runAndWait()


0

In addition to the other answers, hashes are really good for things that should be immutable. The name is unique and can be used to check the integrity of whatever it is attached to at any time.


1

This is fixed in Theano development version. Use one of those 2 command to update Theano depending if the installation is just for your user or for the OS: pip install --upgrade --no-deps git+git://github.com/Theano/Theano.git --user pip install --upgrade --no-deps git+git://github.com/Theano/Theano.git Here is the doc for that update: ...


0

Your xpath seems to be targetting the element of the homepage itself. But the code doesn't work exactly like that: let me try to explain. rules = ( Rule(LinkExtractor(allow_domains=('blogs.reuters.com', )), callback='parse_item'), ) The above code block defines what kind of links are useful (to be processed further). The spider then picks up all the ...


0

Fixed it, it's not done yet, but threading works great! Most recent version is on my GitHub here: https://github.com/dKatara/pySFD #!usr/bin/env python3 from PyQt5.QtCore import * from PyQt5.QtWidgets import * import urllib.request import sys import threading dlThread = 0 hWindow = 0 fProgressCounter = 0.0 class Form(QWidget): def __init__(self, ...


0

I found the problem. You do not join all the threads. The line: for i in threads: t.join() print "join" Should be: for i in threads: i.join() # changed line print "join" Joining t is first just waiting for the last thread created, then in the rest of the iterations a no-op.


1

def score(word, points): counts26555731 = {} for iGotThisFromStackOverflow,char in enumerate(word): if char.isdigit(): counts26555731[word[iGotThisFromStackOverflow-1]] += int(char)-1 continue if char not in counts26555731: counts26555731[char] = 0 counts26555731[char] += 1 return ...


0

I think the basic idea for better performance is to draw to memory offscreen, then blit the result to the screen. You could use the BufferedCanvas to accomplish this (example given at bottom of link page).


0

import itertools with open('path/to/file') as infile: a,b = tee(infile) next(b,None) for line1, line2 in zip(a,b): print line1.rstrip('\n') print line2.rstrip('\n') print ''


0

import subprocess import os print os.getcwd() p = subprocess.Popen("./tutorial1_es2gears") p.communicate() or even more simply os.system("./tutorial1_es2gears") thats assuming you want to block until you finish with that other program


0

For unix you can use termios.tcflush from termios import tcflush, TCIFLUSH import time,sys a = raw_input("first input ") b = raw_input("second input ") time.sleep(5) tcflush(sys.stdin, TCIOFLUSH) a = raw_input("third input ") b = raw_input("fourth input ") ~$ python foo.py first input 1 second input 2 33 33 third input 3 fourth input 4 ...


0

From the docs of Condition.notify: Note: an awakened thread does not actually return from its wait() call until it can reacquire the lock. Since notify() does not release the lock, its caller should. So, the behavior after calling cv.notify() but before calling cv.release() is that thread 1 is still blocked at cv.wait().


0

You can do it like this: ifile = 'bin_503_07.csv' with open(ifile, 'rb') as f: reader = csv.reader(f) reader.next() #skips first line previous_row = reader.next() # load first actual line for row in reader: # this already calls "next()" print previous_row print row print # no need to print "\n", empty "print" ...


0

Here's an example solution for 2 element replacement: primer = 'cattagc' bases = ['a','c','g','t'] # this is the generator for all possible index combinations p = itertools.permutations(range(len(primer)), 2) # this is the list of all possible base pair combinations c = list(itertools.combinations_with_replacement(bases, 2)) results = [] for i1, i2 in p: ...


1

You're combining two different ways to doing things. And, on top of that, you're doing it wrong, but just fixing the "doing it wrong" isn't the answer. You can put your two arguments in a list, and then launch it without the shell, like ['./script.sh', variable]. This is usually better. Using the shell means you have to deal with quoting, and with ...


0

The 302 response is most likely redirecting you to an authentication/authorisation URL to assess your permissions to access the application. This is always the response if you configured your workspace / access via web to be private (no unauthenticated access). You can either share it publicly (click Share -> click 'application' to be public) or provide ...


2

You shouldn't be using shell=True here at all, unless you want any actual shell syntax in your variable (like >file.log) to be executed. subprocess.Popen(['./script.sh', variable], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE) If you really want shell=True, you have a few options to do so securely. The first is to use pipes.quote() (or, in ...


1

The following approach is close enough to your implementation that I think it might be useful. However, if you start working with larger or more complicated csv files, you should look into packages like "csv.reader" or "Pandas" (as previously mentioned). They are more robust and efficient in working with complex .csv data. You could also work through ...


1

Adapted from georg's answer here def random_derangement(n): while True: v = np.arange(n) for j in np.arange(n - 1, -1, -1): p = np.random.randint(0, j+1) if v[p] == j: break else: v[j], v[p] = v[p], v[j] else: if v[0] != 0: return v


1

A project is made up of apps. You can have an app to manage users (Login, registration, etc). Another one for app to manage blogs, etc. All the functionalities should be self-contained, keeping them independant as much as possible. That way you can alter the functionality of your login without making your blog system crash. Every self contained ...


1

I think this is what you're asking for: class MoreSpecificError(WebFault): def __new__(self, old): old.__class__ = MoreSpecificError return old However, it is risky for reasons described here. If all you are doing is catching the exception it should probably work, but no guarantees. I still think it'd be better to just actually ...


-1

Use keypress getch class of tty (linux) and msvcrt (windows) and use sys.stdout.flush() function to flush the buffer


0

Yes, it's possible. I wrote code below in Python 3.2.1: def overload(*functions): return lambda *args, **kwargs: functions[len(args)](*args, **kwargs) Usage: myfunction=overload(no_arg_func, one_arg_func, two_arg_func) Note that the lambda returned by the overload functions choose function to call depending on number of unnamed arguments. The ...


0

You can decode it using: >>> x.decode('utf-8') u'm\\u00e1s'


0

In these lines you read a file line by line: f_in = open('ip.txt', 'r') ips = [] for ip in f_in: ips.append(ip) Unfortunately each line has an end of line character still terminating each line. You then pass the newline in as part of the IP address. You might want to consider stripping the newlines \n from the end of each line you read: f_in = ...


0

x = 'm\\u00e1s' unicode(x) gives: u'm\\u00e1s'


0

something along the line of the following should do the trick: result_list = sorted( chain(post_list, comment_list), key=lambda x: sum( [ point.value for point in Point.objects.filter( point_for_id=x.id, point_for_class=ContentType.objects.get_for_model(x) ], 0 ) ) May I ...


0

To get distinct elements in a list, you can try set(): print set(point_list) Try something like this: import collections a = [1,2,3,4,4,4,5,5,6] counts = collections.Counter(a) print counts # Counter({4: 3, 5: 2, 1: 1, 2: 1, 3: 1, 6: 1}) Output is a dict.


0

Would just add a space after script name: subprocess.Popen(['./script.sh ' + variable], shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)


0

I solved this issue! It was because of missing cookies in the header. I added cookies = response.info().getheader('Set-Cookie') where response was my return of scraped html site. I than added the catched cookie array to my new image download link: imageReq.add_header("Cookie", cookies) and it works just fine!


0

Try this instead: class Room(): def enter(self): pass class Bedroom(Room): def enter(self): print "You wake up dazed and confused with no memory of how you got here." print "You find yourself in a dark bedroom with a closed door and a small lamp on the side." class Start(): # shouldn't this be Game() or something? print ...


0

This is an old question, but seems like it is missing the obvious answer of using list comprehension, so I'm adding it here for completeness: [f for f in os.listdir(path) if not f.startswith('.')] As a side note, the docs state listdir will return results in 'arbitrary order' but a common use case is to have them sorted alphabetically. If you want the ...


1

Add space after ./script.sh: subprocess.Popen(['./script.sh ' + variable] , shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)


0

Fusing together both answers from @Tadeck and @georg, I came up with this: function* range(start, stop, step){ if (typeof stop === 'undefined'){ // one param defined stop = start; start = 0; } if (typeof step === 'undefined'){ step = 1; } if ((step > 0 && start >= stop) || (step < 0 ...


0

countif for a list #counting if a number or string is in a list my_list=[1,2,3,2,3,1,1,1,1,1, "dave" , "dave"] one=sum(1 for item in my_list if item==(1)) two=sum(1 for item in my_list if item==(2)) three=sum(1 for item in my_list if item==(3)) dave=sum(1 for item in my_list if item==("dave")) print("number of one's in my_list > " , one) print("number of ...


0

It is really strange that PyQt QString does not includes a strip() method, but it has a trimmed() method which does the same. See here: http://pyqt.sourceforge.net/Docs/PyQt4/qstring.html#trimmed. What are really lacking in PyQt are the variants lstrip() and rtrip().


0

Yes, that is precisely how I'd expect it to work. While XML processors are required to normalize line-endings on input, there is no requirement to normalize line endings on output. If I were in your shoes, I'd fix the code that generated that XML to avoid putting carriage returns in attributes. Failing that, I'd try: doc.text = ...


1

If you just want to print the rgb value for each individual pixel, your second code block will work if you fix the indentation. def findColor(): pic=takePicture() for pix in getPixels(pic): r = getRed(pix) g = getGreen(pix) b = getBlue(pix) print(r,g,b)



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