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11

If you want to run code in a kernel from another Python program, the easiest way is to connect a BlockingKernelManager. The best example of this right now is Paul Ivanov's vim-ipython client, or IPython's own terminal client. The gist: ipython kernels write JSON connection files, in IPYTHONDIR/profile_<name>/security/kernel-<id>.json, which ...


8

port_selected = socket.bind_to_random_port('tcp://*', min_port=6001, max_port=6004, max_tries=100)


7

If you've successfully built libzmq and jzmq in that order, I would run: $ sudo ldconfig to update the system library cache. Then I would check to see if LD_LIBRARY_PATH is defined like Raffian mentioned, or set your library path explicitly to something like: $ java -Djava.library.path.path=/usr/lib:/usr/local/lib


6

If you just want to connect interactively, you can use SSH forwarding. I didn't find this documented anywhere on Stack Overflow yet, yet this question comes closest. This answer has been tested on Ipython 0.13. I got the information from this blog post. Run ipython --kernel on the remote machine: user@remote:~$ ipython3 kernel [IPKernelApp] To connect ...


6

It looks like you want to implement async request handling on the server side: you let the server accept requests, process them asynchronously, and send the responses back to clients whenever the response data is available for each request. Now of course: how would you know, after you're done processing a request, which client to send it back to? With ...


5

Assuming that you launch subscriber first and then publisher, subscriber eternally tries to connect to publisher. When publisher appears, the connection procedure on the subscriber's side takes some time and your publisher doesn't really care about this. While it fires with messages as soon as it can, subscriber is trying to establish connection. When ...


4

I had similar issues (on Lion, python2.7). Even installing the static package didn't work for me. Ultimately, the trick was to use a slightly modified pip install: pip install pyzmq --install-option="--zmq=bundled" [source]


4

I thought when I import the zmq.green version of zmq that the send and receive calls are non blocking and underneath do the task switching. zmq.green will only yield if these calls would block, it does not yield if they are ready (there's nothing to wait for). In your case the sender is always ready, so it never has a reason to yield. Some pointers: ...


4

Multiprocessing will clearly have much higher memory overhead but will utilize another core (and you don't have to worry about lack of pre-emption) so.. it depends on your needs. It's likely that multiple processes using gevent will get you the highest throughput / lowest latency.


4

You are polling your two receiver sockets in a tight loop, without any blocking (zmq.DONTWAIT), which will inevitably max out the CPU. Note that there is some support in ZMQ for polling multiple sockets in a single thread - see this answer. I think you can adjust the timeout in poller.poll(millis) so that your code only uses lots of CPU if there are lots of ...


3

I am answering my own question I choose multiprocessing over gevent Server had 8 cores Parallelism was needed Choose ZMQ over multiprocessing queue or gevent queue.


3

You should consider using the router-dealer pattern. Your router binds at 2 ends and it has a static IP. It pulls from the multiple clients that connect to it and pushes to the workers on the other end. You can use the ROUTER/DEALER socket types to make this or just use an extra bridge using PUSH/PULL sockets to connect the clients to the workers.


3

Whether the socket blocks or drops messages depends on the socket type as described in the ZMQ::Socket documentation (emphasis below is mine): ZMQ::HWM: Retrieve high water mark The ZMQ::HWM option shall retrieve the high water mark for the specified socket. The high water mark is a hard limit on the maximum number of outstanding messages 0MQ ...


3

Are you having a similar problem to this? https://github.com/zeromq/pyzmq/issues/80 The guy is importing it inside the pyzmq directory.


3

You should use Poller for timeouts: import zmq p = zmq.Poller() p.register(zmqConn.mSocket, zmq.POLLIN) msgs = dict(p.poll(timeout)) if zmqConn.mSocket in msgs and msgs[zmqConn.mSocket] == zmq.POLLIN: # recv there else: # timeout


3

After a chat with pieterh and minrk on #zeromq, we found the cause. ctx.destroy() in 13.1.0 has an indentation bug so it only calls Context.term() if there is an unclosed socket. Workaround: call ctx.term() instead, and make sure all of your sockets are closed before you do.


2

By installing it in a location that is listed earlier in sys.path. The directory your project is in, for example, is always listed first in sys.path and other packages in the same directory will be found before system locations. In other words, put pyzmq in the same folder as your script and it'll Just Work. You can also add entries to sys.path by listing ...


2

First point: zmq.NULL is the ZMQ_NULL constant, for use in zeromq's security mechanism. For example: socket.mechanism = zmq.NULL # or zmq.PLAIN or zmq.CURVE It is not the NULL special C constant. To send an empty message, simply send an empty bytestring: socket.send(b'') The second point is that you need to send the empty frame as a separate message, ...


2

It's known as Slow Joiner syndrome. Read the guide, there are ways to avoid it using pub/sub syncing.


2

A ROUTER to REP socket is an invalid combination as explained here: http://zguide.zeromq.org/page:all#Request-Reply-Combinations


2

You can't create a blocking call without stopping the event loop; that's what "blocking" means. As a coroutine, set_settings returns a Future immediately; the caller is responsible for waiting for that Future to be resolved. In general, this means that anything that calls it must also be a coroutine (or otherwise asynchronous) and use yield ...


2

I have tried it and there's no anything wrong. You could modify the wuclient.py code to see what has been transfered: for update_nbr in range(5): string = socket.recv_string() zipcode, temperature, relhumidity = string.split() print(string) # add this statement total_temp += int(temperature) Then, you should run wuclient.py first and ...


2

You need a separate socket. From the ZMQ guide (http://zguide.zeromq.org/page:all#Pros-and-Cons-of-Pub-Sub): Killing back-chatter is essential to real scalability. With pub-sub, it's how the pattern can map cleanly to the PGM multicast protocol, which is handled by the network switch. In other words, subscribers don't connect to the publisher at all, ...


2

It's fairly straightforward. In one process, bind a PULL socket and open a file. Every time the PULL socket receives a message, it writes directly to the file. EOF = chr(4) import zmq def file_sink(filename, url): """forward messages on zmq to a file""" socket = zmq.Context.instance().socket(zmq.PULL) socket.bind(url) written = 0 with ...


2

I think this is a case of the slow joiner problem, described in the ZeroMQ guide. This "slow joiner" symptom hits enough people often enough that we're going to explain it in detail. I believe the main issue is that all the messages have been sent before the subscriber socket starts listening, and the messages fly by and get dropped. Putting a delay ...


2

I RTFM and the answer is that: ZMQ msgs to and from REP sockets are contained in envelopes. So, under the hood, a REP expects a message with a delimiter and then the message content; then, it strips away the delimiter and returns only the content to the application. This is why the DEALER sends messages like this: socket.send("", zmq.SNDMORE) ...


2

You are encountering ZeroMQ's LINGER behaviour. LINGER defines how long the Context should wait before allowing Context.term to discard messages. The default in ZeroMQ 2.x is forever, and the default in ZeroMQ 3.x is one second. If you tell your sockets that they should only linger a short time, your script should exit just fine: socket = ...


2

ZeroMQ exposed as "sockets on steroids", but there is another approach for implementing a communciation. First of all, forget about wire that links peers in traditional sockets. In 0mq, you have a "quantum teleporter", which delivers your messages from one piece of code to another, hiding actual delivery work from you. You can't just ask 0mq how many ...


2

This is the simplest REQ-REP socket pattern; check the ZeroMQ Guide "Hello World" example.


2

No, you cannot get the address of the sender from ZeroMq. You basically have two choices; add the senders address information to the message itself (not a bad option if you are allowed to modify existing message structures) or add the sender address as a message part, i.e. use ZeroMq multi-part messages. A multi-part message will still be delivered as a ...



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