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6

With bluebird you can use Promise.promisifyAll (and Promise.promisify) to add Promise ready methods to any object. var Promise = require('bluebird'); // Somewhere around here, the following line is called Promise.promisifyAll(connection); exports.getUsersAsync = function () { return connection.connectAsync() .then(function () { ...


3

You can chain promises together in order to have them execute synchronously: myFactory.getPoints().success(function (data) { $scope.points = data; return myFactory.getStates(); }) .success(function (data) { $scope.states = data; return myFactory.getLeases(); }) .success(function (data) { $scope.leases = data; });


3

I almost don't want to give a solution here because mixing strings with integers in a single column is a terrible idea. Completely destroys performance and prevents any of the benefits that kdb offers. First and foremost, re-think your setup. If you insist on keeping it as is, you can query it like this: tab:([] col1:`a`b`c;col2:1 2 ...


3

What if you let getSearchResult return a promise? var getSearchResult = function (dataHolder,text) { //return $.getJSON('/Api/Data/GetSearchItem/' + text).done(); jQuery.support.cors = true; return $.ajax({ url: '/Api/Data/GetItem/' + text, type: 'GET', dataType: 'json' ...


3

You can't resolve a promise with multiple properties just like you can't return multiple values from a function. A promise conceptually represents a value over time so while you can represent composite values you can't put multiple values in a promise. A promise inherently resolves with a single value - this is part of how Q works, how the Promises/A+ spec ...


3

You can return an object containing both values — there's nothing wrong with that. Another strategy is to keep the value, via closures, instead of passing it through: somethingAsync().then(afterSomething); function afterSomething(amazingData) { return processAsync(amazingData).then(function (processedData) { // both amazingData and processedData are ...


2

As @sholanozie said, you aren't returning anything from parseRedditData. I'm guessing what you want is: var Feeds = function(){ this.reddit = new Reddit(); this.parseRedditData().then(function(data) { console.log(data); }); }; ... Feeds.prototype.parseRedditData = function(){ var _this = this; return ...


2

You should be able to use Q.all. Something like this. var promises = arrayOfQueries.map(function(q) { return entityManager.executeQuery(q); }); return Q.all(promises).then(function() { return entityManager.executeQuery(query2); });


2

For the second part, it's similar to the $.when call except it comes as an array: $q.all([restApi.fetchData(tweetUrl), restApi.fetchData(instaUrl)]).then(function(data) { // Save the the return data values to the respective scopes. $scope.tweetUrl = data[0]; $scope.instaUrl = data[1]; });


2

Using the Q library for example: function getUsers(param){ var d = Q.defer(); connection.connect(function () { connection.query('SELECT * FROM Users', function (err, result) { if(!err){ d.resolve(result); } }); }); return d.promise; }


2

Assuming your database adapter API doesn't output Promises itself you can do something like: exports.getUsers = function () { var promise; promise = new Promise(); connection.connect(function () { connection.query('SELECT * FROM Users', function (err, result) { if(!err){ promise.resolve(result); } ...


2

I'm really not sure how your code is producing any output at all. You're trying to use a promises as though they were deferreds, and you're using document.write(), which I would imagine is overwriting your whole page. And while not necessarily a bug, you are using the deferred antipattern. So I'm not really sure why you got the result you did, but here is ...


2

LoopBack queries do not return promises at this point in time. Please post a feature request in the LoopBack repository to remind us (after reading https://github.com/strongloop/loopback/wiki/Issues of course). However, I do believe ES6 promises are on the roadmap. That said, you can create your own promise and return that instead: var deferred = ...


2

I recommend to take a look at MDN's Promise docs which offer a good starting point for using Promises. Alternatively, I am sure there are many tutorials available online.:) Note: Modern browsers already support ECMAScript 6 specification of Promises (see the MDN docs linked above) and I assume that you want to use the native implementation, without 3rd ...


2

Well, this is going to a be a bummer. You can't While a lot of promise libraries let you do this and will report unhandled rejections for you - in Q you have no methods to automatically detect these failures. You have to Use .done or change a promise library. Heck, even native promises are going to be able to do this in a few days. Q specific solution: ...


2

Lets do it step by step . I assume you have basic understanding of Quick Sort algo. Also, there is one correction in code you mentioned which I have corrected in step 5. Example list: q)x: 1 0 5 4 3 Take a random element from list which will act as pivot. q) rand x Suppose it gives us '4' from list. Split list 'x' ...


2

to remove the date, you can use the cast operator, $. To reference only the time, you can prefix $ with `time as shown below. q).z.z 2015.02.23T14:10:33.523 q)`time$.z.z 14:10:30.731 q)t:([]ts:10#.z.N;ti:.z.t-til 10) q)exec `time$ts-ti from t 00:00:00.000 00:00:00.001 00:00:00.002 00:00:00.003 00:00:00.004 00:00:00.005.. You can see more examples ...


2

No, you cannot use _.find or any other synchronous iteration method with asynchronous callbacks - it doesn't work with filter either. You currently try to return from an asynchronous callback, which just won't work. You'll first need to write an asynchronous find function: function find(arr, predicate, i) { i = i >>> 0; if (i >= ...


2

Basically, the point is that the promise's then handler will not run before the current flow of code has finished executing and control is returned to the execution environment (in this case Node). This is an important characteristic of Promises/A+ compliant promises because it ensures predictability. Regardless of whether the promise resolves immediately: ...


2

I'll make some assumptions about table and column names, which I'm sure you can extrapolate We receive quotes from exchange and store them in KDB Ticker Plant As a matter of definition, tickerplant only stores data for a very small amount of time and then logs it to file and fires the data off to RDB (and other listeners). with minimum impact on ...


2

I have a feeling that the way I use promises is not correct Yes, you use the deferred antipattern a lot. Promises do chain, which means that you simply can return values and even promises from your then callback, and the .then() call will yield a promise for those return values. And when you throw, the result promise will be rejected. Your usage of ...


1

Rewrite your final call like this: function errorHandler(err) { console.log('You had an error, ' + err); } first .then(second, errorHandler); The promise captures any exceptions that throw within it, you need to explicitly handle it. A variation that's q specific would be: first .then(second) .fail(errorHandler); You may consider this easier ...


1

Yes, it works. There are two reasons it might fail: variable vs function hoisting or dynamic this. Hoisting and variable definitions. A difference between: var foo = bar; And: var foo = function(x){ return bar(x); } Given it's bar's signature is that in the second snippet bar is lazily evaluated. So if bar is undefined you'll get an error in the ...


1

I think this is all just a combination of the free-32bit memory limitation, the fact that your row counts are possibly large and the fact that (unavoidably) something must be pulled entirely into memory when retrieving data from a column, whether it is the column itself that gets entirely pulled in (in the non-nested case) or if its the nested-index column ...


1

Bluebird makes no guarantees on the execution order of timers. So if you set three timeouts set to the same time span we don't enforce which one gets executed. As you can see if you run this code in the browser "Timeout 1" will log and not timeout 3: var p = Promise.delay(2000) .then(function() { return Promise.delay(2000); }) ...


1

The problem is success() does return the original promise. then() call returns a promise (resolved with a value returned from a callback) while .success() is more traditional way of registering callbacks and doesn't return a promise. So a proper solution is $q.all([ myFactory.getPoints().then(function (response) { $scope.points = response.data; ...


1

When setting up a promise you take two parameters, resolve and reject. In the case of success, call resolve with the result, in the case of failure call reject with the error. Then you can write: getUsers().then(callback) callback will be called with the result of the promise returned from getUsers, i.e. result


1

getSearchResult does not return a promise. So you can not use q.js promise. There are two ways to solve this issue. The nice way: Implement your own promise resolver (see the q.js documentation. The Deferreds Part is what you are looking for) The fast way: Add a callback to your getSearchResult function and use this: var getSearchResult = function ...


1

You need to do $q.all ([ajaxCall_1, ajaxCall_2, restApi.fetchData (instaUrl)]).then(function () {//success call back}); Basically you need to pass the promise object which you have created earlier. Hope this could help you.Thanks.


1

Sounds like you have an array of queries you want to execute sequentially. try this: var queries = ..., // an array of breeze EntityQuery objects entityManager = ..., // a breeze EntityManager promise = Q.resolve(); // chain the queries together. queries.forEach(function(query) { promise = promise.then(function() { return ...



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