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3

QEMU uses the C setjmp()/longjmp() mechanism for dealing with most exceptions: when we detect something like a page fault we set some flags to indicate the type of exception, and then longjmp() out to the top-level "execute code" loop. That loop then looks at the flags and sets the CPU state up for "enter exception handler" before continuing to execute guest ...


3

So, the problem here is that the versatilepb does not support SD/MMC cards in U-Boot, so you can't really. If however you wanted to do this on another device that does support SD/MMC (like the vexpress-a9) you would do: $ dd if=/dev/zero of=sd.bin bs=1k count=$((64 * 1024)) $ fdisk ./sd.bin ... create a partition Then read loopback mounting individual ...


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Having done more or less exactly this for a Versatile AB, it's most certainly possible. The simplest way is to find where that board's command set is defined, and hack in the commands you want by defining the relevant CONFIG_CMD_* symbols. In this case, that place is include/configs/versatile.h. Looking at my checkout of 2015.07, I seem to have added, among ...


2

QEMU is written in C so it doesn't use C++ exceptions. You don't have to handle ISA traps via C++ exceptions either. Exceptions should be used when useful to you as implementer, nothing more. Also note that the traps are not something way too special, they are still part of the emulated system's workflow. It is perfectly legal to encode division like: if ...


1

All QEMU's AArch64 emulated CPUs support NEON (SIMD) by default -- the SIMD instruction support is more-or-less a required part of the ARMv8 architecture so if we didn't emulate it then we would be unable to run Linux or any other interesting guests. If you're running a "bare metal" guest OS of your own devising, you will need to make sure you write to the ...


1

So the answer here depends in part on the board you are emulating with QEMU. Next, unfortunately the versatilepb has been dropped from mainline U-Boot some time ago (and being ARM926EJS it is not the ideal core for ASMP, you may wish to try vexpress a9 instead). Now, all of that said, you want -pflash to pass along a binary file you control the contents of ...


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I think it's true, the PIC ordinarily delivers interrupts only to CPU 0, including timer interrupts. Most OSes will not attempt SMP with PIC, since the CPU1-whatever cannot get or receive any interrupts (including some kind of timer interrupt for process scheduling); for example, Linux with "noapic" disables all but CPU0. I think this OS hit an odd corner ...



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