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27

The solution is to extend QNetworkAccessManager class and override it's virtual method QNetworkAccessManager::createRequest In our implementation we check the path of the requested url and if it's the one we don't want to download we create and hand over an empty request instead of the real one. Below is a complete, working example. #include ...


12

But if you want to do it by just setting the header value, here's how you can do that: // HTTP Basic authentication header value: base64(username:password) QString concatenated = username + ":" + password; QByteArray data = concatenated.toLocal8Bit().toBase64(); QString headerData = "Basic " + data; request.setRawHeader("Authorization", ...


11

You can use event loop: QEventLoop loop; connect(netReply, SIGNAL(finished()), &loop, SLOT(quit())); loop.exec(); // here you have done. Also you should consider adding some shorter then network timeout (20s?). I'm not sure if finished is called even if an error occured. So it is possible, that you have connect to error signal also.


10

If you want to test asynchronous behavior, you have to use QEventLoop or other class with similar functionality. I suggest you write helper method like this: bool waitForSignal(QObject *sender, const char *signal, int timeout = 1000) { QEventLoop loop; QTimer timer; timer.setInterval(timeout); timer.setSingleShot(true); ...


10

QTimer timer; timer.setSingleShot(true); QEventLoop loop; connect(&timer, SIGNAL(timeout()), &loop, SLOT(quit())); connect(reply, SIGNAL(finished()), &loop, SLOT(quit())); timer.start(30000); // 30 secs. timeout loop.exec(); if(timer.isActive()) { timer.stop(); if(m_reply->error() > 0) { ... // handle error } ...


8

QNetworkAccessManager comes with the QtNetwork module. You could do this: #include <QtNetwork/QNetworkAccessManager>, which should compile. However, it will not link, you need to link to QtNetwork. To achieve this, you should tell QMake that you're using QtNetwork. Add this to your .pro project file: QT += network. This has two effects: first, the ...


7

I might be wrong, but I think there is a problem with your signals: // uploader > its thread connect(fileUploader, SIGNAL(canceled()), fileUploaderThread, SLOT(quit()), Qt::QueuedConnection); connect(fileUploader, SIGNAL(finished()), fileUploaderThread, SLOT(quit()), Qt::QueuedConnection); // uploader > this connect(fileUploader, SIGNAL(canceled()), ...


6

You're creating compressedFile on the stack, and passing a pointer to it to your QNetworkRequest (and ultimately your QNetworkAccessManager). As soon as you leave the method you're in, compressedFile is going out of scope. I'm surprised it's not crashing on you, though the behavior is undefined. You need to create the QFile on the heap: QFile ...


5

This line was missing: QT += network in the .pro file.


5

From documentation of void QNetworkRequest::setSslConfiguration ( const QSslConfiguration & config ): By default, no SSL configuration is set, which allows the backends to choose freely what configuration is best for them. You can verify this statement using the following code: #include <QtGui/QApplication> #include ...


5

The recommended way is to connect to the authenticationRequired signal and set the credentials from there.


5

The data in QNetworkReply is not ready immediately after the call to QNetworkAccessManager::get(). The call is asynchronous, and you need to connect to either the finished() signal of QNetworkAccessManager, or readyRead() signal of QNetworkReply before you attempt to retrieve any data.


5

I stumbled upon a following enhancement that was added in QT5: https://bugreports.qt-project.org/browse/QTBUG-22033 Basically, the idea behind this enhancement os to check keychain for username/password if it intermediate proxy is requiring auth credentials. It turns out this was badly implemented, and this code has been added to the ...


4

It looks like someone has already wanted the same and wrote a proxy for the QNetworkReply.


4

got it to work in this way it works, using setApplicationProxy. I still don't understand why setting proxy parameters after instance creation doesn't work (as in the initial example) def set_proxy(self, proxy): proxy_url = QUrl(proxy) if unicode(proxy_url.scheme()).startswith('http'): protocol = QNetworkProxy.HttpProxy else: ...


4

Have you added the NetworkServices capability to your app? NetworkServices is a Symbian capability which grants access to remote services (such as dialing a number or sending a text message, WLAN, GPRS), which might incur a cost for the mobile device user.


4

First I recommend you to read the relevant documentation from the Qt Documentation Reference that you can find here: http://doc.qt.nokia.com/latest/classes.html. Looking at your code sample it seems that you already have, along side with QNetworkRequest and QNetworkReply, a QNetworkAccessManager. What you need is to connect a slot to the ...


4

QObject: Cannot create children for a parent that is in a different thread. You get this because you are creating the QNetworkAccessmanager in the constructor of Citizen, which is being called in the "original" thread. When the Citizen object is moved to the new thread the QNetworkAccessmanager still has its thread affinity set to the original thread but ...


4

void MainWindow::on_download_clicked() { CDownloader cDown; cDown.Do_Download(); } When that method returns, cDown is immediately destructed. You need to keep that object alive at least as long as you haven't received and processed the reply. For that, either cDown should be a member of your MainWindow, or a pointer to (or collection of pointers to) ...


4

From your question, I think you're really asking which form of dependency injection (i.e. injecting your dependent QNetworkAccessManager into objects) to use. In your case you're using Constructor injection. This is a perfectly known and accepted form of injection. It strongly communicates your wizard class depends upon the QNetworkAccessManager which ...


4

maybe you can do something like this: having an enum of the different methods enum GetMethod { getUserId, getUserDetails }; And you keep a hash of the reply and the corresponding method: QHash<QNetworkReply*, GetMethod> hash; QNetworkReply *reply1 = nam->post(requestUserId, data); hash[reply1] = GetMethod::getUserId; QNetworkReply ...


4

There is no support for SFTP in Qt SDK but Qt Creator implements SFTP. I have isolated the library that contains SSH and SFTP and I have created a new project named QSsh in Github. The aim of the project is to provide SSH and SFTP support for any Qt Application. I have written an example on how to upload a file using SFTP. Take a look at ...


4

Do you have an event loop somewhere else in your code? If not, try this : QEventLoop loop; m_NetworkAccessMNGR = new QNetworkAccessManager(this); QNetworkRequest networkRequest; networkRequest.setUrl(QUrl("http://www.sample.com/test.php?un=user&pass=123345")); QNetworkReply *reply = m_NetworkAccessMNGR->get(networkRequest); connect(reply, ...


4

The non-interactivity is because re->readAll() on a device with unknown size is a blocking call. It will keep reading until the request is finished. The problem with large files has to do with growing of the byte array that holds the file. At some point, your byte array will be, say 400MB, and then it will have to grow to say 2x that size, so you'll have ...


3

QWebPage::setNetworkAccessManager method documents says that Note: It is currently not supported to change the network access manager after the QWebPage has used it. The results of doing this are undefined. So my guess is that once you setup an application wide proxy and once QWebPage is constructed it gets a QNetworkAccessManager and you can not change ...


3

Like Phil has mentioned QNetworkAccessManager has abstracted most of the methods. To get the connection state use QNetworkSession before you work with the QNetworkAccessManager. To get the state of the current session, use this state function ( http://doc.qt.nokia.com/qtmobility/qnetworksession.html#State-enum) Reading the complete documentation here is ...


3

I imagine that the QWebPage has already queried all the QNetworkReply objects as they came in. The docs say QNetworkReply is a sequential-access QIODevice, which means that once data is read from the object, it no longer kept by the device. It is therefore the application's responsibility to keep this data if it needs to. so resetting it ...


3

That page appears to have a redirect. From the Qt docs for 4.6: Note: When the HTTP protocol returns a redirect no error will be reported. You can check if there is a redirect with the QNetworkRequest::RedirectionTargetAttribute attribute.


3

I suggest to connect a slot to the void QNetworkReply::metaDataChanged () signal of your reply. The Qt doc says This signal is emitted whenever the metadata in this reply changes. metadata is any information that is not the content (data) itself, including the network headers. In the majority of cases, the metadata will be known fully by the time ...


3

It looks like you're getting the data correctly, it's just that that particular URL just forwards you to a different one. Try http://www.erepublik.com/en (with the /en) instead.



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