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Sockets are an application level API for performing network communication. The reliability of sockets depends on the network protocol that you select when you create the socket. If you select TCP/IP, you will get "reliable" transfer ... up to a limit. If you select UDP/IP you will get "unreliable" transfer. As stated in other answers, TCP ensures that ...


4

I appear to have solved this by moving where basic_qos is called. Placing it just after channel = connection.channel() appears to alter the behaviour to what I'd expect.


4

There are several useful QoS parameters, although not all are as easily measured as e.g. 99.98% uptime, which is easily derived - 99.98% of the time, your server is available. Other metrics: What sort of bandwidth do they support? How about if it's a shared pipe and they've multiple high-volume clients? You're unlikely to get an honest answer to this from ...


2

That means your downtime is going to be roughly 2 hours per year. Out of 8760 hours, it's safe to assume your website isn't going to lose much traffic or business because of problems in their hosting. I would look at testimonials or search online for reviews of the company for anything else.


2

You can set the TOS flags with Socket.setsockopt passing IPPROTO_IP as the level, IP_TOS as the name of the option, and your desired value: require 'socket' s = TCPSocket.new('example.com', 80) s.setsockopt(Socket::IPPROTO_IP, Socket::IP_TOS, YOUR_TOS_VAL)


2

You should probably use an MQ if you need guaranteed delivery no matter what happens (like if the other party goes offline for maintenance) and you don't want to write all the logic yourself. Sockets is what you use to connect to an other party, no matter if that party is the MQ or the final receiver of the message.


2

Sockets are as reliable as you make your implementation, and based upon the underlying hardware. If you don't want the hassle of making a guaranteed delivery service (under what conditions? 100% is never going to happen), a message queue system is a good bet. The message queue will have implemented all of the persistence, queueing, retries, etc which you ...


2

Some or all of these attributes could be gleaned from switching on diagnostics for the service, but as this is likely to hurt performance, you may alternatively want to consider writing a few custom performance counters for your application.


2

I suspect any network issue can cause this problem. There's no concept of QoS (quality of service) with basic UDP (even to the point that you can lose packets, have duplicates etc.). Your network card has to queue up packets to write to the network, and so you can't guarantee deliveries since it's queueing up packets from different applications. Routers ...


2

Check this link: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/248611


2

i think you are good to go. The truth is that i haven't run altq explicitly on any of my VMs but i can't think of a reason that it wouldn't work. Finally keep in mind that in post 5.1 releases altq is being reworked completely. check out the presentation by henning@


2

Are you using tcp segmentation offload to the nic? (You can use "ethtool -k $your_network_device" to see the offload settings.) This is the only way as far as I know that you would see 64k tcp packets with a device MTU of 1500. Not that this answers the question, but it might help avoid misdiagnosis.


2

Add mtu 100000 to your tc qdisc creation command. See this post for more info. Quoting the post, in case it disappears: Basically if your interface has TSO/GSO enabled (check using ethtool -k ethX), or you're using the loopback interface - then you'll probably hit a problem. It turns out that the loopback interface has GSO/TSO enabled as default, plus ...


2

As for if this code could work correctly, I doubt so. This change would cause trouble, like: dev_queue_xmit() -> enqueue to QoS (I assume you mean Qdisc) -> rtl8139_start_xmit() -> dev_queue_xmit() # creating a loop Currently, no way for "ifconfig" to get to know "number of drop packets(due to ...


2

This goes against the security of the OS. You are basically asking to be able to bypass a security measure enforced by the OS. If you were allowed to do this, any malicious code could do the same thing, so I don't think that you can (or should) do it.


1

Tigase already support XEP-0198 - stream management extension which includes packet delivery confirmation. Therefore I am not sure if you really need to implement your QoS system for Tigase. Please explain why XEP-0198 is not good enough and what you are trying to implement. What you really mean by QoS system? A few other questions - what happens when the ...


1

Clearly, the answer is no, the Winsock QoS API's are not useful. It is not that QoS itself is useless, just that socket-level QoS need not be set by application developers. Some devices, like SIP-based phones, set the ToS bits (Differentiated Services Code Points) in the Internet Protocol headers in outgoing packets, to provide class-based QoS to ...


1

If the packets stay within your own network then you can apply and control QoS polices using these DiffServ markings - effectively giving some traffic higher priority than others, with sensible limits and safeguards. Once you go into someone else's network or onto the internet, most networks will reset or remove any Diffserver marking at the ingress point ...


1

It's a well-studied topic in EE and CS. WiFi network throughput mainly depends on two factors: signal-to-noise (SNR) value, and network congestion. The former one is a physical-layer (PHY) issue, while the latter one a MAC layer issue. Data rate measured at both layers are definitely different. At PHY, data rate is determined by SS (or more precisely, ...


1

If your network implements DiffServ, then you can use setsockopt() with IP_TOS to set the DiffServ code point (DSCP) on your packets to a suitable value. (Before DiffServ was specified, these bits were interpreted as Type of Service (TOS) and priority fields, hence the name.) Note that the UDP-based transport protocol (uTP) in modern BitTorrent ...


1

From what ever happened to ipv5: In the late 1970’s, a protocol named ST — The Internet Stream Protocol — was created for the experimental transmission of voice, video, and distributed simulation. Two decades later, this protocol was revised to become ST2 and started to get implemented into commercial projects by groups like IBM, NeXT, Apple, and ...


1

I have found a solution to this problem. The author actually acted quite quickly. The solution is in the following pull request: https://github.com/adamvr/MQTT.js/pull/18


1

Start here: Google this: TCP congestion avoidance algorithm and this: rfc2581 and this: tcp slow start and this: tcp fast recovery That is assuming you are using TCP. You can get ideas for solving your problem from those articles. Maybe check out iproute2 or traffic generators that can also be used to introduce latency. The code might open up some ideas ...


1

You definitely want to start with the Linux advanced routing and traffic control howto. I'd recommend using the tc utility from iproute2 that the howto uses, but if you want a more direct API you can look at its source for an example.


1

The upper bound of the advertised TCP MSS is the MTU of the first hop route. If you're seeing 64k segments, that tends to indicate that the first hop route MTU is excessively large - are you using loopback or something for testing?


1

You might want to check settings on your NIC driver. Some drivers coalesce interrupts, which trades off higher throughput for increased latency. http://www.29west.com/docs/THPM/latency-interrupt-coalescing.html Also, I don't know if the NIC is buffering multiple output packets, but if it is, that will make it harder to enforce the desired priorities: if ...


1

The easiest way to do this is to send data from a device through the network being tested and then receive it back again on the same device. This allows you to easily calculate the time taken for each packet (delay), the variance in time for different packets (jitter), and to detect any packet loss. Note that packet loss is a relative thing - a packet may ...


1

If you are talking about making service claims and exposing them for consumption vis-a-vis WS-QoS, there is no first-party support for this. You are looking at creating your own Service Behavior to implement this (doable, but difficult). For monitoring and business logic based on QoS metrics, you have a much bigger job ahead of you. There are several ...


1

You should use Ruby's setsockopt, which wraps the Linux system call. require "socket" s = TCPSocket.new("example.com", 80) s.setsockopt(Socket::IPPROTO_IP, Socket::IP_TOS, 32) See a list of TOS/DSCP settings here. Also see the answer to this question.



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