Hot answers tagged

186

After creating your QVBoxLayout in Qt Designer, right-click on the background of your widget/dialog/window (not the QVBoxLayout, but the parent widget) and select Lay Out -> Lay Out in a Grid from the bottom of the context-menu. The QVBoxLayout should now stretch to fit the window and will resize automatically when the entire window is resized.


61

Layouts are actually easy to understand "i think" :) A simple explanation of layouts can be found in the qt book "C++ Gui programming with QT 2nd edition" What you should be aware of regarding layouts and their size policies Most Qt widgets have a size policy. This size policy tells the system how the widget should stretch or shrink. Its got from the ...


55

In Designer, activate the centralWidget and assign a layout, e.g. horizontal or vertical layout. Then your QFormLayout will automatically resize. Always make sure, that all widgets have a layout! Otherwise, automatic resizing will break with that widget! See also Controls insist on being too large, and won't resize, in QtDesigner


40

another way to use .ui in your code is: from PyQt4 import QtCore, QtGui, uic class MyWidget(QtGui.QWidget) ... #somewhere in constructor: uic.loadUi('MyWidget.ui', self) both approaches are good. Do not forget, that if you use QT recource files (extremely useful) for icons and so one, you must compile it too: pyrcc4.exe -o ui/images_rc.py ...


32

In my experience with Qt Designer and other toolkits/UI-tools: UI tools speed up the work. UI tools make it easier to tweak the layout later. UI tools make it easier/possible for non-programmers to work on the UI design. Complexity can often be dealt with in a UI tool by breaking the design into multiple UI files. Include small logical groups of ...


31

Our experience with Designer started in Qt3. Qt3 At that point, Designer was useful mainly to generate code that you would then compile into your application. We started using for that purpose but with all generated code, once you edit it, you can no longer go back and regenerate it without losing your edits. We ended up just taking the generated code and ...


24

You can't. The visible property seems to be voluntarily removed from the property editor of Qt Designer and you can't add it back. You can add the property manually to the .ui file by adding the following XML block inside the node for the widget you want to hide: <property name="visible"> <bool>false</bool> </property> But ...


23

This does seem to be possible in the version of Qt Designer 4.5.2, but it can't be done from the Signal/Slot Editor dock-widget in the main window. This is what worked for me Switch to Edit Signals/Slots mode (F4) Drag and drop from the widget which is to emit the signal, to the widget which is to receive the signal. A Configure Connection dialog appears, ...


23

You need to generate a python file from your ui file with the pyuic tool (site-packages\pyqt4\bin) pyuic form1.ui > form1.py with pyqt4 pyuic4.bat form1.ui > form1.py Then you can import the form1 into your script.


22

Click on the Edit Signal/Slots tool. Create a connection for your button. For this, select your button in the designer by pressing on it with the left button of the mouse. Move the mouse to some place in the main window to create a connection with the main window (it is like a red line with a earth connection). When you release the mouse button, the ...


22

I started with doing everything hand-coded, and of late have been switching to using Qt Designer for most forms. Here are some benefits for each position: Using Qt Designer The biggest time saver for me is managing complex layouts; it saves a lot of tedious coding. Simply (very roughly) arrange your widgets, select them, right-click, and put them in the ...


21

You need to select two or more widgets and then use the layout -> vertical/horizontal splitter option. This will give designer enough context to be able to perform the operation. Also note that the selected widgets cannot be part of a layout already. If they are, you need to break the layout first (layout->Break Layout in context menu).


19

I started to write my first PyQT application (PyQT is used only to handle GUI), and it seems, that good toolchain is: QtDesigner to generate .ui s and handle resources and some IDE, that can set QtDesigner to edit those. I use Eclipse, cause it is highly customisable. You can compile your .qrc and .ui by demand by doing somewhat like this at application ...


19

I found this article very helpful. http://talk.maemo.org/archive/index.php/t-43663.html I'll briefly describe the actions to create and change .ui file to .py file, taken from that article. Start Qt Designer from your start menu. From "New Form" window, create "Main Window" From "Display Widgets" towards the bottom of your "Widget Box Menu" on the left ...


18

right click on the main window and select "change signals and slots" and add a new slot. It will appear in your signal slot editor.


18

Combining Max's answer and Shriramana Sharma's mailing list post, I built a small working example for loading a mywindow.ui file containing a QMainWindow (so just choose to create a Main Window in Qt Designer's File-New dialog). This is the code that loads it: import sys from PyQt4 import QtGui, uic class MyWindow(QtGui.QMainWindow): def ...


17

I found it was impossible to assign a layout to the centralwidget until I had added at least one child beneath it. Then I could highlight the tiny icon with the red 'disabled' mark and then click on a layout in the Designer toolbar at top.


16

I don't believe so. It's fairly simple to add one programmatically, though. If you're just wanting to show a message, you could use: statusBar()->showMessage(tr("Message Here"));, or alternatively if you really needed a QLabel on the status bar, you could do something along the lines of: QLabel *label = new QLabel("Message"); ...


16

Don't blame yourself, I think Qt's Layout logic is a bit confusing when you start to deal with. If I understood well what you are saying, the contents of the form are not "connected", i.e. not resizing and not restricted by the form size, right? I think you have missed to set a "centralWidget layout". Try the following: Open your form by double clicking it ...


16

Select the layout, and then drop the widget onto the corresponding selected item in the Object Inspector pane. If you find it tricky to select the layout on the actual form, you can also select it via the Object Inspector pane.


13

Qt Creator is Qt's IDE. You don't have to use it, but it greatly simplifies Qt development. Qt Designer is a graphical tool that lets you build QWidget GUIs. Qt Quick Designer is similar, but for building QML GUIs. Both are built in to Qt Creator. This is explained in a little more detail over at Wikipedia.


12

It all depends on how you want the widget to be displayed. you could add a layout to your central widget in your MainWindow and add your custom widget to the layout if you want your custom widget to be centralWidget of the MainWindow then use setCentralWidget If you want the custom widget as a subWindow then add MdiArea to your MainWindow. Then add custom ...


12

I'd start with a file structure like: project\ main_app.py # main Qt application with App class main_view.ui # Qt designer file for main view other_view.ui views\ main_view.py # main view with MainView class other_view.py gen\ ui_main_view.py # ui files auto-generated by pyside-uic ...


12

The basic workflow when writing a PyQt4 gui is: Design the UI using Qt Designer. Generate a Python module from the UI file using pyuic4. Create an Application module for the main program logic. Import the GUI class into the Application module. Connect the GUI to the program logic. So, given the UI file calc.ui, you could generate the UI module with: ...


11

The 'lockup' was caused by Designer opening a modal resource dialog. However, since last using Designer, I had moved my second screen to the other side of my primary screen, the modal dialog was open in the old screen (no longer connected) so I couldn't see it. Resolution: Windows-key + Left-key moved the missing dialog back onto a connected screen.


11

In latest Qt Designer, right-click a widget in the Object Inspector and choose your preference under Layout Alignment.


10

The layout doesn't "inject" itself in the parent-child tree, so the widgets stay (direct) children of their parent widget. You could use QLayout::count() and QLayout::itemAt() instead.


10

Use Signals and Slots Editing Mode for connecting predefined Qt signals directly to predefined Qt slots. So for "Close" button on a simple dialog, you can just drag a connection from the button to the dialog, select the clicked() signal and the reject() slot, click "OK", and there would be nothing more to do. For signals and/or slots you want to define ...


10

It is going invisible, but its because you do not have the ellipse centered around the correct point. QWidget::setMask "causes only the parts of the widget which overlap region to be visible. If the region includes pixels outside the rect() of the widget, window system controls in that area may or may not be visible, depending on the platform". Try this ...


10

You need two steps in Qt Designer and a few lines of code in the form constructor: Set the contextMenuPolicy of your widget to the value ActionsContextMenu. Create actions using the action editor tab. For each action you created in Qt Designer, put a line such as the following in the form constructor: ui->yourwidget->addAction(ui->youraction);



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