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4

You can wait until the sources are published the usual way, or clone the top-level Qt 5 git repository. git clone https://git.gitorious.org/qt/qt5.git qt5 then check out the target branch cd qt5 git checkout 5.4.1 The article Building Qt 5 from Git could be of help.


2

You should add Qt::EditRole in your data() implementation. QVariant myModel::data(const QModelIndex &index, int role) const { if (index.isValid() && index.row() <= stringModel_.size() && (role == Qt::DisplayRole || role == Qt::EditRole) ) { return stringModel_[index.row()]; } else { return QVariant(); } }


2

A signal that is emitted in the same thread is just a call (unless you ask explicitly for using a queue), so from a performance point of view the cost is negligible unless you're creating a lot (millions) of signals per second (and in that case probably using signals is a bad idea anyway). If this is needed for GUI-related machinery then the cost is most ...


2

Create a container to store the pointer of each checkbox. Create another container to store the "state" of each checkbox. For a binary check box, you can use isChecked() to query whether or not a checkbox is checked. Otherwise you can call checkState() to return the state as enum if you use a tri-state check box (see the edit). When loading settings, assign ...


2

The error is because the compiler isn't aware of what a QQuickItem is. You need to include it: #include <QQuickItem> QQuickItem is only forward-declared in QQuickView's header, for example, so you can't rely on it to include QQuickItem for you, and shouldn't anyway. Also, the comment about moc not working with classes defined in main.cpp is wrong; ...


1

I think you have the mechanism more or less right. You just have to make sure the height calculation is done correctly (i.e. before the visibility of the widget changes). The following example works correctly for me (only tested on Linux, though): from PySide import QtGui class Window(QtGui.QWidget): def __init__(self): super(Window, ...


1

In Qt 5.4, there are headers with version specific OpenGL Functions, so: #include <QOpenGLFunctions_3_3_Core> Or whatever version you want to use. Then somewhere with a valid OpenGL context like QOpenGLWidget::initializeGL() create and initialise q QOpenGLFunctions object: QOpenGLFunctions_3_3_Core *fun = new QOpenGLFunctions_3_3_Core; ...


1

As I said there is no borderColor in TextAreaStyle. But you can do it in "tricky" way: Rectangle { color: "green" anchors.fill: parent anchors.margins: 20 TextArea { anchors.fill: parent anchors.margins: 1 style: TextAreaStyle { backgroundColor : "yellow" } } }


1

Found the code of the default message handler for android, and formatting is hardcoded, so I write a similar version: #include <android/log.h> static void android_message_handler(QtMsgType type, const QMessageLogContext &context, const QString &message) { ...


1

I personally would connect the A's signals to a (duplicate) update signal in B. That way you hide B's implementation from C and can change the internal mechanism later on. It's not an overly elaborate form of it, but the connect(B.getA(), SIGNAL(update()), this, SLOT(doStuff())) version in C smells a bit of Law of Demeter.


1

What's going wrong here? Is it a bug? An if and yes, can anyone confirm it? It seems the second call of setGeometry with the same arguments use different origin, and the coordinates (0, 0) make the widget move to top-left corner. You can use other coordinates such as setGeometry(100, 50, w, h) to see the difference. Here is the source code of ...


1

In the end, I went with using a QWindow, take its window handle for integrating the 3D visualization and then overlaying it with QQuickView components (with the QWindow as parent). The only drawback of that solution is that it does not allow for transparency.


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I tested calling QWidget::ensurePolished after creating the widget, and calling getHighlightColor after that gave me the correct QColor. main.cpp QApplication a(argc, argv); a.setStyleSheet("MyWidget{qproperty-highlightColor:#ff0000;}"); mainwindow.cpp mw = new MyWidget(this); mw->ensurePolished(); qDebug() << mw->getHighlightColor(); ...


1

The straightforward approach with OpenGL is to create a structure containing function pointers: struct sLGLAPI { sLGLAPI() { memset( this, 0, sizeof( *this ) ); }; PFNGLACTIVETEXTUREPROC glActiveTexture; PFNGLATTACHSHADERPROC glAttachShader; PFNGLBEGINQUERYPROC glBeginQuery; PFNGLBINDATTRIBLOCATIONPROC ...


1

Why inheritance? This is bad design. Simple object of new type do the job nicely: class ButtonCounter : public QObject { Q_OBJECT int mCounter; public: Q_PROPERTY(int counter READ counter WRITE setCounter NOTIFY counterChanged ) explicit ButtonCounter(QObject *parent) : ...



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