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49

Insert into the QTableWidget following kind of items: QTableWidgetItem *item = new QTableWidgetItem(); item->setFlags(Qt::ItemIsSelectable|Qt::ItemIsEnabled); Works fine! EDIT: QTableWidgetItem *item = new QTableWidgetItem(); item->setFlags(item->flags() ^ Qt::ItemIsEditable); This is a better solution. Thanks to @priomsrb.


30

Just set the row count to 0 with: mTestTable->setRowCount(0); it will delete the QTableWidgetItems automatically, by calling removeRows as you can see in QTableWidget internal model code: void QTableModel::setRowCount(int rows) { int rc = verticalHeaderItems.count(); if (rows < 0 || rc == rows) return; if (rc < rows) ...


28

There is two methods: void QTableWidget::setCellWidget ( int row, int column, QWidget * widget ) and void QListWidget::setItemWidget ( QListWidgetItem * item, QWidget * widget ) They allow to insert any widget and other controls that inherit QWidget. Checkbox/radio button/combobox do inherit from QWidget.


20

1). Create table with this example code: filesTable = new QTableWidget(0, 2); QStringList labels; labels << tr("File Name") << tr("Size"); filesTable->setHorizontalHeaderLabels(labels); filesTable->horizontalHeader()->setResizeMode(0, QHeaderView::Stretch); filesTable->verticalHeader()->hide(); filesTable->setShowGrid(false); ...


19

I don't know QTableWidget but your code seems to have a logic flaw. You are forgetting that as you go round the loop you are decreasing the value of mTestTable->rowCount(). After you have removed one row, i will be one and mTestTable->rowCount() will also be one, so your loop stops. I would do it like this while (mTestTable->rowCount() > 0) { ...


15

For a checkbox using the item's setCheckState method should do what you need both for list and table widgets. See if code below would work for you: List widget: QListWidgetItem *item0 = new QListWidgetItem(tr("First"), listWidget); QListWidgetItem *item1 = new QListWidgetItem(tr("Second"), listWidget); item0->setCheckState(Qt::Unchecked); ...


14

You can use QTableWidgetItem::setData() like so: setData(Qt::UserRole, myData); // set Where myData is a supported QVariant type. You can use QTableWidgetItem::data() to retrieve the value that you store. If you need more than one you can use Qt::UserRole + 1, + 2, and so on (Qt::UserRole is "The first role that can be used for application-specific ...


12

When you want to populate QTableWidget, you need to set row and column counts before inserting data example in documentation (PySide documentation is better than PyQt). And you can't just insert text string separated by tabs into table, you need to prepare it yourself, and then populate table with QTableWidgetItem's by calling QTableWidget.setItem. It will ...


12

You cannot set the background color of a cell unless it contains a QTableWidgetItem (as the background color is a property of the item). So you need to populate your QTableWidget with empty items first. In your example, create the item before you attempt to set the background color. tableWidget->setItem(8, 0, new QTableWidgetItem); ...


11

The headers of the table have methods for controlling this: header = table.horizontalHeader() header.setStretchLastSection(True) or: header.setResizeMode(QHeaderView.Stretch)


9

It can be done using : void QHeaderView::setSectionResizeMode (ResizeMode mode) void QHeaderView::setSectionResizeMode (int logicalIndex, ResizeMode mode) The horizontal header is reachable from a QTableWidget using horizontalHeader(). This is it: ui->tMeal->horizontalHeader()->setSectionResizeMode (QHeaderView::Fixed); Note that legacy ...


8

You should only create the connection once since the signal is a signal on the table and not on an individual QTableWidgetItem. When emitted it will give you the QTableWidgdetItem that you clicked on as the argument.


8

I prefer to do: ui->tableWidget->setFocusPolicy(Qt::NoFocus); You can also change the focus policy using the design tab.


7

It looks like this dotted border around selected cell you're trying to hide is a focus rectangle. Any given cell can have focus and not be selected at the same time and vice-versa. If you want this border to not get painted use an item delegate. There you can remove State_HasFocus style from the item's state before painting it. Pls, see an example below on ...


7

from PyQt4 import QtGui import sys imagePath = "enter the path to your image here" class ImgWidget1(QtGui.QLabel): def __init__(self, parent=None): super(ImgWidget1, self).__init__(parent) pic = QtGui.QPixmap(imagePath) self.setPixmap(pic) class ImgWidget2(QtGui.QWidget): def __init__(self, parent=None): ...


7

When you declare your tmpLineEdit, you should be declaring it as a QLineEdit* instead of a QWidget*. Your loop grabs the widget, casts it to a QLineEdit* and then tries to put it back into a QWidget*. Also, I'd recommend using qobject_cast<QLineEdit*> (or dynamic_cast) so that you can ensure the cast succeeded. int ...


7

You have a couple of questions rolled into one...short answer, yes, you can add a button to a QTableWidget - you can add any widget to the table widget by calling setCellWidget: # initialize a table somehow table = QTableWidget(parent) table.setRowCount(1) table.setColumnCount(1) # create an cell widget btn = QPushButton(table) btn.setText('12/1/12') ...


7

For QTableWidgetItem, the Qt.DisplayRole and Qt.EditRole are treated the same. This means that, in the code: item.setData(Qt.DisplayRole, "Row: %s" %(i) ) item.setData(Qt.EditRole, i) the second line will simply overwrite the data set in the first line. So, effectively, there is no separate EditRole (unless the data and setData functions are ...


7

cmannett85's recommendation is a good one. Read the docs about a dozen times. Then, if performance and memory issues are your primary concern and you think you can out-perform the QTableWidget implementation, then a QTableView interface on top of a QAbstractTableModel or QStandardItemModel is what you're looking for. Since you're new to Qt's model-view ...


6

I had similar target and similar question. I looked both solutions. I created log file with 20 mb size. Then, I loaded him into QTableView with own model, and to QTableWidget with standard model. QTableView was more faster (about 30 sec) than QTableWidget (about 1.5 min), but solution with QTableWidget was easer. About you question i think, if you will ...


6

The result of using Xor depends on what the current state is. I'd suggest using item->setFlags(item->flags() & ~Qt::ItemIsEditable); to make sure Editing is turned off regardless of the current setting.


6

QTableWidget test; test.clear(); test.setRowCount( 0);


6

Its sorting alpha-numerically (so, in terms of strings, '1', '10', '11', '12', '2', '20', '21', '22', '3', '4' etc. is the proper sort order. It appears that for a QTableWidgetItem, if you use the setData(Qt.EditRole, value) method, the sort order will work. Depending on your version of Qt (I assume) you may have to overload the less than method of your ...


6

To create columns: ui->tableWidget->setColumnCount('the number of columns'); before you can insert rows you need to set the total rows: ui->tableWidget->setRowCount('number of rows'); now loop through rows and columns and set the data in each for (int ridx = 0 ; ridx < 'number of rows' ; ridx++ ) { for (int cidx = 0 ; cidx < ...


6

From the QTableView documentation: By default, the cells in a table do not expand to fill the available space. You can make the cells fill the available space by stretching the last header section. Access the relevant header using horizontalHeader() or verticalHeader() and set the header's stretchLastSection property. You should give that a try. ...


5

Insert the row in a method of your class. Try this class TableDialog : public QDialog { Q_OBJECT public: TableDialog(QWidget *parent = 0); private slots: void addRow(); private: QTableWidget *tableWidget; QDialogButtonBox *buttonBox; }; And the (partial) implementation: TableDialog::TableDialog(QWidget *parent) : QDialog(parent) { ...


5

well, i played a little with the code and read some more documentation the answer to the problem is def createtable(self): rows = self.tableName.rowCount() columns = self.tableName.columnCount() for i in range(rows): for j in range(columns): item = self.cell("text") # execute the line below to every item you ...


5

it seems for me that you don't understand Qt's Signals and Slots concepts. The SIGNAL & SLOT macro take an interface. Something like connect(table, SIGNAL(cellChanged(int, int)), this, SLOT(updateSP())); might work but you need to have same argument count in your slot, to make it work like you expect: connect(table, SIGNAL(cellChanged(int, int)), ...


5

You could derive from QTableItem and provide your own data member, or you could use the QTableView with your own model.


5

First, you want to make sure the QTableWidget is placed inside a layout. For instance, QTableWidget* tw = new QTableWidget(parent_widget); QVBoxLayout* layout = new QVBoxLayout(); layout->addWidget(tw); parent_widget->setLayout(layout); assuming parent_widget is already pointing to the widget containing the QTableWidget. This will ensure that the ...



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