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10

Quickly: ipython qtconsole --IPythonWidget.buffer_size=1000 Or you can set it permanently by adding: c.IPythonWidget.buffer_size=1000 in your ipython config file. For discovering this sort of thing, a helpful trick is: ipython qtconsole --help-all | grep PATTERN For instance, you already had 'buffer', so: $> ipython qtconsole --help-all | grep ...


8

As far as I know, the notebook_repr_html option only applies to the actual IPython Notebook and not the QTConsole. In the QTConsole, you can do: from IPython.display import HTML import numpy as np import pandas df = pandas.DataFrame(np.random.normal(size=(75,5))) HTML(df.to_html()) One problem you might encounter is if the HTML is too long for your ...


5

Interesting, it seems that either this option was forgotten or not wanted in the qtconsole. A way around this (or perhaps an intended way?) is to use the -m flag. This runs a module as a script so you if you called: ipython qtconsole -m my_script it will run the code in my_script, for me this works. Notice it needs to be my_script not my_script.py ...


4

As asmeurer said, when in your py3k environment in the command prompt, you can launch a 3.4 kernel with the ipython notebook command. You can run both a 2.7 and a 3.4 at the same time if you specify a different port, for instance, ipython notebook --port 8080 The 2.7 will default to 8888. Note that, by default, IPython will look in your current directory ...


3

The launcher always points to the root environment (Python 2). If you have activated the Python 3 environment, you can launch the notebook by just typing ipython notebook (and the same with the qtconsole with ipython qtconsole).


3

The problem might be related to your python path. I had almost the exact same problem. I had installed PyQt using Homebrew and I was getting the same error message. Finally what solved the problem was adding the following line to my .bash_profile: export PYTHONPATH=/usr/local/lib/python2.7/site-packages:$PYTHONPATH Since I am a beginner myself, I can't ...


3

QtConsole is part of IPython. It is built on the QtRichTextWidget, but all of the console / terminally stuff is implemented in IPython.


3

You can either output everything to console or everything to Qt Creator's Application Output panel. For sake of completeness: If you want to have all the output in the panel instead of console you can uncheck "Run in terminal" in Project->Run settings.


2

You can follow the following recipe to embed an IPython session into your program: try: get_ipython except NameError: banner=exit_msg='' else: banner = '*** Nested interpreter ***' exit_msg = '*** Back in main IPython ***' # First import the embed function from IPython.frontend.terminal.embed import InteractiveShellEmbed # Now create the ...


2

To embed a kernel without blocking, have a look at this example from the IPython repository. IPython knows some clever tricks for integrating itself with the Qt event loop, so you can run a console and your application at the same time. For things like interactive debugging, this is the way to go. If you need to embed the console into your own application, ...


2

So, you have multiple Python installations, and aren't sure which one you have. You have both Homebrew and MacPorts. Your MacPorts is broken and you don't know how to fix it. Fixing each of these may not be that hard, but I think it's time to wipe the slate clean and start over. The "easy" way to do this is to reinstall the OS, using the standard ...


2

If you select from the Interactive Consoles dropdown on the Python(x,y) Home launcher, "IPython (Qt)" and then click either the Console 2 or cmd.exe button, it should then run IPython (Qt) with the Qt4Agg backend which will allow you to plot in a separate window and apply titles and so on. For more info see What is a backend. What Python(x,y) in your ...


2

To redirect QDebug to multiple places, you miight have to write some code, maybe like this: QList<QtMsgHandler> messageHandlers_; static void messageDispatcher(QtMsgType type, const char *msg) { foreach (QtMsgHandler callback, ::messageHandlers_) callback(type, msg); } static void messageLogger(QtMsgType type, const char *msg) { QString ...


2

This QTconsole copy regression has been fixed, see https://github.com/ipython/ipython/issues/3206 - I can confirm that the desired behavior is again present in the QtConsole in the Canopy 1.2 GUI and, I suspect, in the ipython egg installable by free users from the Enthought egg repo.


2

It seems like qtconsole adds an handler to the root logger: In [1]: import logging ...: root = logging.getLogger() ...: root.handlers ...: Out[1]: [<logging.StreamHandler at 0x7fd8e00e1f98>] While using the normal python interpreter or just ipython: In [1]: import logging In [2]: root = logging.getLogger() In [3]: root.handlers Out[3]: ...


2

Since I know, cmake is not a python package. It is a build tool. So, all you have to do is install it. You can get it from here: CMake site Also, you should check if the Apple development tools does have cmake already.


2

After reading tcaswell's comment, I investigated a bit more what IPython is storing. This is my method: ## start afresh ## what variables are there before calling plot()? ## make sure you copy() otherwise it's just a reference. before = vars().copy() plt.plot(range(10)) ## now, what's available after? after = vars().copy() ## print out the differences ...


2

You can use this to start an ipython console in a given qt widget: from IPython.qt.console.rich_ipython_widget import RichIPythonWidget from IPython.qt.inprocess import QtInProcessKernelManager def put_ipy(parent): kernel_manager = QtInProcessKernelManager() kernel_manager.start_kernel() kernel = kernel_manager.kernel kernel.gui = 'qt4' ...


2

The multiprocessing module is meant for this use case. A simple complete example of its usage is: import multiprocessing def my_function(x): """The function you want to compute in parallel.""" x += 1 return x if __name__ == '__main__': pool = multiprocessing.Pool() results = pool.map(my_function, [1,2,3,4,5,6]) print(results) ...


1

I had the same problem, though with the most recent brew of ipython the ImportError included PyQt5 (along with PyQt4 and PySide). So if it didn't work with PyQt5 before, it does now. Adding the correct PYTHONPATH to .bash_profile fixed it for me, even in my virtualenv. (I don't have the reputation to up-vote or comment on oxtay's answer, where this would be ...


1

Setting environment variable QT_API=pyqt5 solved the same problem for me.


1

In http://2sn.org/python/ipython_config.py there is a # c.TerminalInteractiveShell.history_length = 10000 Does it work?


1

The documentation about building and installing PySide on MacOSX is here http://pyside.readthedocs.org/en/latest/building/macosx.html


1

A simpler and more robust approach is to run ipython remotely as you did, and instead of trying to plot the figures remotely, instead save them remotely. At the same time mount the remote directory using sftp and open it in your local file browser. Make sure to refresh your directory view in case the images that were saved remotely are not visible (otherwise ...


1

Qt console is not built around readline or anything related to the OS terminal. It's a Qt widget that mimics much of the behavior of terminal IPython and also has several cool features of its own (like inline plots and the ability to render Latex). It comes with a lot of key bindings (which you can find by running the %guiref magic on it) but unfortunately ...


1

Those are ANSI escapes, special sequences of characters which terminals process to switch font styles. The Qt console interprets some of them, but not all of the ones that serious terminals do. This sequence works to print in red, for instance: print('\x1b[1;31m'+'Hello world'+'\x1b[0m') However, if you're trying to write a cross platform application, be ...


1

I just use this: from IPython import embed; embed() works better than anything else for me :)


1

How about using %hist n to print line n (or a range of lines) without prompts (including line continuations), and doing you copy from that? (Simply scrolling back to that line is nearly as good). In [1]: def foo(): ...: return 1+2 ...: In [6]: %history 1 def foo(): return 1+2


1

One of the cool features of ipython is session logging. If you enable it, the code you input in your session is logged to a file. It's very useful, I use it all the time. To make things even niftier for me, I have a shell alias ipy_log_cat, which prints the entire file. You can do something like: ipy_log_cat | tail to get the most recent input lines. (this ...


1

You should build PyQt with python3 support. So: brew install pyqt --with-python3



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