Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

With Qt and the QtNetwork module, you can get one of the MAC addresses like that: QString getMacAddress() { foreach(QNetworkInterface netInterface, QNetworkInterface::allInterfaces()) { // Return only the first non-loopback MAC Address if (!(netInterface.flags() & QNetworkInterface::IsLoopBack)) return ...


7

UDP is not a connection-based protocol. You don't get a separate socket for each peer, instead there's one socket for all communication on a single port. Therefore, there's some extra effort needed to reply to an incoming UDP packet. You need to retrieve the sender address from the datagram you received, and send back to that same address. In the sockets ...


5

The data in QNetworkReply is not ready immediately after the call to QNetworkAccessManager::get(). The call is asynchronous, and you need to connect to either the finished() signal of QNetworkAccessManager, or readyRead() signal of QNetworkReply before you attempt to retrieve any data.


5

libcurl and curlpp are great libraries, but using them adds a dependency to your project that probably you can avoid. Recent versions of Qt recommend to use QNetworkAccessManager to make network requests (included http requests) and receive replies. The simplest possible way to download a file is: QNetworkAccessManager *manager = new ...


4

You seem to use QFtp, which is obsolete. You should use QNetworkReply (and QNetworkAccessManager), which has finished() and error() signals: QNetworkReply documentation.


4

Giuseppe is right, you don't need to use libcurl, curlpp and similar libraries. There is no need for that, Qt has a simple and working class on it own. Keep in mind that the standard way of sending request and retrieving reply is asynchronous. You always have to connect the manager finished(QNetworkReply*) signal to a slot. If you send multiple requests ...


4

You're accessing m_replyStr of a newly initialised instance tmp, which doesn't set anything into its m_replyStr. So it has the default-initialised value of "empty string." EDIT Based on your follow-up question, perhaps you were looking for something like this? class MyClass; class Widget : public QWidget { Q_OBJECT public: Widget(MyClass ...


3

There is no really simple way. You have to create your own protocol. However, that protocol can often be very very simple protocol. On writing end, simple example Convert QString filename to QByteArray using QString::toUtf8() Write to socket the length of QByteArray as binary int Write to socket the bytes from the QByteArray containing the file name Write ...


3

You can create your own data structure that will represent file contents and its file name and convert it to QByteArray and vice versa. You can send two requests: the first with the file name and the second with data.


3

to download a file you need : a QNetworkAccessManager in this case http. a QFile in this case file. a QNetworkReply in this case reply connect the reply with a slot that writes the bytes received through QNetworkAccessManager in this case the slot is called readingReadyBytes() so i create the request and connect to my slot: const QNetworkRequest& ...


3

Have you tried creating a custom SLOT and connecting it to the QNetworkReply error SIGNAL? You can then inspect the argument to determine the error and decide how you want to deal with it. QNetworkReply::NoError 0 no error condition. Note: When the HTTP protocol returns a redirect no error will be reported. You can check if there is a redirect with the ...


3

When your Test class constructor goes out of scope, your ftp object gets destroyed. QFtp::connectToHost function does not block and returns immediately. Same goes for QFtp::login. To solve this problem you can allocate your QFtp object using new: QFtp *ftp = new QFtp(this);


3

Trying to answer your questions: Are the methods mentioned above sufficient to send complexe data, and how ? Well, yes, sending a raw byte array is the lowest level format. However, you need a something that can get you uniquely from your complex data to the byte array and from the byte array back to your complex data. This process is called in ...


2

Unfortunately, that's how the Windows telnet.exe client works and there's no way to change that. You must not rely on client-specific behavior like this when handling TCP streams. TCP does not guarantee message boundaries, but it does guarantee that, from your point of view, the data is delivered int he same order it was written by the client. You must take ...


2

The reason you can't connect is because the SSL certificate (with serial 2F:DF:BC:F6:AE:91:52:6D:0F:9A:A3:DF:40:34:3E:9A) presented to you when you connect to www.gmail.com is issued for a different domain - www.google.com. This has nothing to do with root CA certificate store because no root CA certificate is needed to compare cert's Subject CN field with ...


2

QDataStream operator << is used for serialization, and not to write raw data as is. For example byte sequences are sent with a 32-bits "header" indicating the size of the sequence. And because you are casting the whole structure to char*, it interprets it as a string and stops at the first '\0' character which is in the int part of the struct. So ...


2

Try using socket->flush() after you write the data. http://doc.qt.digia.com/qt/qabstractsocket.html#flush


2

No, in most cases you don't need a full simulated web browser. In most cases, just performing the same web requests like a web browser would do is enough. Try to record the web requests in your browser, using a plugin like "HTTP Live Headers" or "Firebug" in Firefox. I think Chrome provides a similar tool out of the box. These tools record the GET and POST ...


2

I'm having the same problem - getting the "not acceptable" error when trying to download a file. I did some googling and experimenting and I just found that adding: request.setRawHeader( "User-Agent" , "Mozilla Firefox" ); before get(request) changes the outcome. :) I guess the user agent of QNetworkRequest is not recognizable by the server and that's ...


2

Try this code so show the hardware addresses of each interface: QString getMacAddress() { QString text; foreach(QNetworkInterface interface, QNetworkInterface::allInterfaces()) { text += "Interface:"+interface.hardwareAddress()+"\n"; } return text; } int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { QCoreApplication a(argc, argv); ...


2

I found out that there was a qconfig.h file being included that had the following define: //Do not need this one #ifndef QT_NO_NETWORKPROXY # define QT_NO_NETWORKPROXY #endif This was obviously the problem.


2

QtNetwork is a module, not a class to import. Write for exemple: #include <QNetworkAccessManager>


2

Solved! Thanks to this question for the hint - I added 'filename' to the content disposition for the QHttpPart and it now uploads as expected. I thought filename was optional but seems to work in this case. Hope this helps someone else! QString preview_name = "preview.jpg"; QHttpPart previewFilePart; ...


2

To me it seems highly unlikely that this is caused by Qt filtering JavaScript, but more likely by something on the server doing something based on the user agent. Try calling request.setRawHeader("User-Agent", "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.2; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/32.0.1667.0 Safari/537.36"); before you send off your request. ...


2

It is not possible to create a template Q_OBJECT class (see this and answers). Instead of using static inheritance, you should use a run-time inheritance, and inject an object inheriting from FtpDelegate class. It looks like the FtpServer is actually a factory creating connections. From your question, I do not see why it has to be Q_OBJECT class. So you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible