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21

You don't have to create separate tests applications. Just use qExec in an independent main() function similar to this one: int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { TestClass1 test1; QTest::qExec(&test1, argc, argv); TestClass2 test2; QTest::qExec(&test2, argc, argv); // ... return 0; } This will execute all test methods in ...


14

Do not put test code into your main project. You should create a separate project for your unit tests then build and run that. Do not modify your main project to run tests. Ideally, you should have a build server set up that will automatically invoke your unit test project and build your releases. You can script this. Never hack your main application to ...


9

An example taken from Charm (Tests/CMakeLists.txt): SET( TestApplication_SRCS TestApplication.cpp ) SET( TEST_LIBRARIES CharmCore ${QT_QTTEST_LIBRARY} ${QT_LIBRARIES} ) SET( SqLiteStorageTests_SRCS SqLiteStorageTests.cpp ) QT4_AUTOMOC( ${SqLiteStorageTests_SRCS} ) ADD_EXECUTABLE( SqLiteStorageTests ${SqLiteStorageTests_SRCS} ) TARGET_LINK_LIBRARIES( ...


9

I don't know that QTestLib is "better" than one framework for another in such general terms. There is one thing that it does well, and that's provide a good way to test Qt based applications. You could integrate QTest into your new Google Test based setup. I haven't tried it, but based on how QTestLib is architected, it seems like it would not be too ...


9

To append to Joe's answer. Here's a small header I use (testrunner.h), containing an utility class spawning an event loop (which is, for example, needed to test queued signal-slot connections and databases) and "running" QTest-compatible classes: #ifndef TESTRUNNER_H #define TESTRUNNER_H #include <QList> #include <QTimer> #include ...


8

Why not using the unit-testing framework included in Qt? An example : QtTestLib Tutorial.


8

Perhaps you are interested in these links. This solution automatically generates the main.cpp with all declared tests. http://qtcreator.blogspot.com/2009/10/running-multiple-unit-tests.html http://qtcreator.blogspot.com/2010/04/sample-multiple-unit-test-project.html


7

I started off using QtTest for my app and very, very quickly started running into limitations with it. The two main problems were: 1) My tests run very fast - sufficiently quickly that the overhead of loading an executable, setting up a Q(Core)Application (if needed) etc often dwarfs the running time of the tests themselves! Linking each executable takes up ...


7

I suggest that you put all sources and headers which both your main application project and your unit test project need into one .pri (.pro include) file. Put this file in the main project. Then include this file in both projects. Note that whenever adding a new class to the main project, QtCreator automatically appends the SOURCES += and HEADERS += lines ...


6

My solution, First structure source like below MyApp MyAppUnitTest Under MyApp project, use a MyAppSrc.pri to locate source files, SOURCES += \ ../../../framework/src/myapp.cpp \ ../../../framework/src/mycontrol.cpp HEADERS += \ ../../../framework/inc/myapp.h \ ../../../framework/inc/mycontrol.h INCLUDEPATH += ...


6

Here is an example of using cmake 2.8.11 and Qt5.2. Note that cmake now supports testfiles with a .moc-include at the bottom. CMakeLists.txt: cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 2.8.11) project(foo) enable_testing() # Tell CMake to run moc when necessary: set(CMAKE_AUTOMOC ON) # As moc files are generated in the binary dir, tell CMake # to always look for ...


5

Figured out how to do this. Makes Squish totally unnecessary, but it requires source code access. In your test class, store a pointer to the QApplication and any widgets you want to test. For ease of use, store a pointer to your application's QMainWindow. Then, either instantiate your test class with pointers to the widgets you plan on testing, or use ...


4

You can add include paths to other project directories in your .pro file like so: INCLUDEPATH += <directory> Then it should be able to find the headers that you are including. Edit: Based on comment That's another story altogether. Undefined reference usually means you are missing a dependency. This can usually be resolved with one of two things. ...


4

Use multiple targets and preprocessor flags to achieve this: int main(int argv, char *args[]) { #ifdef TEST ::TestsClas::runTests(); #endif QApplication app(argv, args); MainWindow mainWindow; mainWindow.setGeometry(100, 100, 800, 500); mainWindow.show(); return app.exec(); } Then go into the projects pane and add a new target ...


3

With this trick you can collect the individual test xml reports to temporary buffers/files; all from a single test binary. Lets employ QProcess to collect separate test outputs from within one binary; the test calls itself with modified arguments. First, we introduce a special command-line argument that harnesses the subtests proper - all still within your ...


3

In our setup with QTest, we did a few things to make it nicer. Define a subclass of QObject that is used as a base class for any new unit-test class. In the constructor for that class, we add the instance of the test to a static list of tests, and in the destructor we remove it. We then have a static function that loops through the tests and runs ...


3

Finally figured out how to run tests before starting the app. I added one static method in the tests class to run the tests: #include <QtTest/QtTest> TestClass::runTests() { TestClass * test = new TestClass(); QTest::qExec(test); delete test; } In the main function, do: int main(int argv, char *args[]) { ::TestsClas::runTests(); ...


2

You could write a custom Timer class which starts a usually monotonic elapsed timer on creation and prints the elapsed time on deletion (see QElapsedTimer::elapsed()): timer.h: #include <QElapsedTimer> class Timer { public: Timer() { timer.start(); } ~Timer() { qint64 ms = timer.elapsed(); qDebug("Time needed: %s ...


2

Qt creator does not yet explicitly support running unit tests at this time (up to Qt Creator 2.0beta). So for the time being you will need to start the tests manually. If you are using a build system like cmake instead of qmake then you could try to run the unit tests automatically as part of the build process itself. Unfortunately I am not aware of any ...


2

Yes, you can use the useful unit test module. Look in particular at the class QTestEventList. Just provide the QWidget you want to test, or the QMainWindow or whatever subclass you want and add the list of events you want to generate. If you want to generate a sequence of points so that you can reproduce in case of failure, use qsrand() and qrand().


2

QtTest is mostly useful for testing parts that require the Qt event loop/signal dispatching. It's designed in a way that each test case requires a separate executable, so it should not conflict with any existing test framework used for the rest of the application. (Btw, I highly recommend using QtCore even for non-GUI parts of the applications. It's much ...


2

Yeah, QTest forces bit strange test structure and is generally inferior to Google Test/Mock Framework. For one project I'm forced to use QTest (client requirement), and here's how I use it: I compile all test together as a subdir template project To make creating new tests easier, I share a lot of project configuration by using common.pri file I include in ...


2

Related to the answer posted by @cjhuitt This is an example that removes the need of manually calling each test object I TRY TO AVOID THINGS LIKE THIS: MyTestClass1 t1; t1.run(); MyTestClass2 t2; t2.run(); //etc... My solution is to let the test objects inherit from a base class that adds itself to a static list The main program then executes all ...


2

Your actual string has a new line character. Hence the comparison fails.


2

Try QT += testlib, without starting #


1

For "normal" key-click tests (like entering text in a line-edit), it is not necessary to show the window. This is in line with what you'd expect if you sent key events to a hidden widget during normal running of the application. But for testing shortcuts, the target window must be shown - which is again in line with what you'd expect. A keyboard shortcut ...


1

I've just been playing around with this. The main advantage of using Google Test over QtTest for us is that we do all our UI development in Visual Studio. If you use Visual Studio 2012 and install the Google Test Adapter you can get VS to recognise the tests and include them in its Test Explorer. This is great for developers to be able to use as they write ...


1

You need to create an app with it (QTEST_MAIN(..) builds the main function for you), and specify CONFIG += qtestlib in the .pro file. When you run it, a console opens that prints out the test results.


1

The question is in general about how to test modal dialogs. Any modal dialog including QMessageBox will not return from exec_() until it is closed, so the test code in your second code box probably never gets executed. You could just show() it (making it non-modal) and then follow your code but don't forget to close and delete the dialog afterwards. Or ...



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