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32

There is no clear answer to your question. It depends entirely how your data is organized. Something to keep in mind: Quadtrees work best for data that is mostly two dimensional like map-rendering in navigation systems. In this case it's faster than octrees because it adapts better to the geometry and keeps the node-structures small. Octrees benefit if ...


26

I think your code is not so memory hungry as you might expect. It does break and reform lists, but it tends to keep most sublists intact. As others remarked, it might be possible to do better still using Hold wrappers and/or HoldXXX attributes, so as to emulate call-by-reference. For a hard core approach to some related data structure implementations, see ...


23

Your quadtree structure isn't optimal. You're right to store 4 subtrees per node, but actual objects should only be stored inside the leaves, not inner nodes. Therefore the collection holding the actual objects needs to be moved to the leaves. Let's have a look at the implementation of the operations: Insert an object into the quadtree: Check if the ...


15

Suppose that you have a circle centered at (x, y) with radius r and want to find all points in a quadtree that are in the circle. One idea is as follows: Construct the bounding box inscribing the circle. This is the smallest rectangle containing the circle, which has upper-left corner (x - r, y - r) and lower-right corner (x + r, y + r). Any point in ...


15

Quadtrees are used when you only need to store things that are effectively on a plane. Like units in an classic RTS where they are all on the ground or just a little bit above it. Essentially each node has links to 4 children that divide the node's space up into evenly distributed quarters. Octrees do the same but in all three dimensions rather than just ...


13

Quadtrees seem to solve the specific problem I asked. Kd-Trees are a more general form, for any number of dimensions, rather than just two. R-Trees may also be useful if the objects being stored have a bounding rectangle, rather than being just a simple point. The general term for these type of structures is Spatial Index. There is a Java ...


10

A red-black tree is not a spatial index; it can only sort on a single ordinal key. A quadtree is (for two dimensions) a spatial index that allows fast lookup and elimination of points. An Octree does the same thing for three dimensions.


10

Wikipedia has a good article on quadtrees. The quadtree section in these slides is very good. Here are some C implementations (found via Googling for quadtree c -"c++" -"c#"): http://hyantes.gforge.inria.fr/doc/quadtree_8c-source.html http://xw2k.nist.gov/dads/html/quadtree.html http://www.informatik.uni-ulm.de/acm/Locals/1999/src/quadtree.C


9

You can establish a convention that every element is contained in the smallest quadtree node which contains it fully. Then when you check the collisions for node A, you proceed like this: current node = root node check collisions of A with each element directly in current node if A can be contained entirely in any of sub-nodes of the current node, set the ...


8

Here is a more compact version. It uses the same data structure as the original version. The functions splitBox and insideBox are essentially the same as well (just written in a slightly different way). Instead of adding points one-by-one, the initial box contains all the points at the beginning so there is no need for the qtInsert routines. In each ...


8

You can use 1 << N instead of pow(2, N). This works because 1 << N is a compile-time constant, whereas pow(2, N) is not a compile time constant (even though it will be evaluated at compile-time anyway).


8

The difference (algorithmically) is: in quadtrees, the data reaching a node is split into a fixed (2^d), equal size cells, whereas in kdtrees, the data is split into two regions based on some data analysis (e.g. the median of some coordinate). Quadtrees do not scale well to high dimensions, due to the exponential dependency in the dimension. The data ...


6

The problem is in your property it is setting itself in circular loop public Vector2 position { get ; set ; } Or declare a private field private Vector2 _position; public Vector2 position { get { return _position; } set { _position = value; } }


6

Since all nodes have exactly four children it is a quadtree. It is also a 3D array, since it is three levels deep.


5

The reason to use a quadtree is because you can then split on x- and y-coordinates, an octree on x, y and z, making collision detection trivial. Quadtree: if an element is not in the topleft, it wont collide with one in topright, bottomleft or bottomright. It is a very basic class, so I don't understand what you are missing in implementations you found. ...


5

CREATE TABLE mytable (id INT NOT NULL, mypoint GEOGRAPHY NOT NULL, ...) CREATE SPATIAL INDEX SX_mytable_mypoint ON mytable (mypoint) SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE mypoint.STDistance(geography::STGeomFromText(N'POINT (latitude longitude)', 4326) <= @N


5

You could pad the image until it is an equal and power of two size. While it may add some extra memory requirements, the increase shouldn't be that large. The 2x1 example would be padded to a standard 2x2 and store the real size or use a special value for padded nodes so you can restore the original size. I know this is an old question, but I hope I ...


5

I've recently implemented code, that should solve your problem. It's free for download on my recent blog post. Quadtrees for Space Decomposition, Java Implementation http://kirstywilliams.co.uk/blog/2012/08/quadtrees-java-implementation/


5

1. Wouldnt you have to rebuild the entire tree every several ms? In Javascript wouldnt this be extremely slow to do? I suppose that depends on what you're using it for; but yes, the author's collision-detection example in his blog post about his QuadTree implementation will clear the tree and repopulate it roughly 24 times per second (so, about once ...


5

A blue screen of death shold be just impossible to reach form a regular user space program... no matter what you do. However unfortunately it is easy to bump into this kind of system level bug when writing software that interacts heavily with device drivers because they are software too and they are not bug free (and a bug in a device driver can take down ...


5

An OpenGL context can only be bound to one thread at a time (through wglMakeCurrent() on Windows). Therefore you should not being using gl* functions across threads, even if you use Mutexes to secure access to certain variables in memory the calls will fail. What I would suggest is to move your gl* calls into your rendering thread, however, have things ...


5

In this comment, joferkington refers to the current question and says: Just for whatever it's worth, scipy.spatial.KDTree (and/or scipy.spatial.cKDTree, which is written in C for performance reasons) is a far more robust choice than the options listed.


4

This code const bool contains(const double &x, const double &y, const double &w, const double &h) const { return (this->x < x && this->y < y && this->x + this->w > x + w && this->y + this->h > x + h); <---- error here } is not the same as this ...


4

Take a look at the d3_layout_forceAccumulate method: https://github.com/mbostock/d3/blob/master/src/layout/force.js#L294-324 The quadtree by itself doesn't compute the center of charge for its particles (because the quadtree only knows about particle positions, and doesn’t make any assumptions about their charges). After the quadtree is generated, the ...


4

Stack overflow is because: public Vector2 position { get { return position; } set { position = value; } } the set actually sets the same again. You may want this: private Vector2 _position; public Vector2 position { get { return _position; } set { _position = value; } } or its short version: public Vector2 position { get; set; } //BTW, ...


4

You've asked a lot of questions and I don't think I can answer all of them, but here are answers to as much of your question as I can. This is most certainly a nearest-neighbor algorithm where the goal is to find the two closest points to each point in the first vector and then check whether the ratio of their distances is less than some cutoff value. You ...


4

Quadtrees work best for square images whose size is a power of 2 (for example, most textures). You shouldn't think of each node as representing a "pixel". Instead, think of it as representing a "square block of pixels of size 2^k". In the case of final leaves, k is 0, so each leaf node represents a square block of pixels of size 1, that is, a single pixel. ...


4

This is such an embarrassing and clumsy mistake. If you look at Node.collideDescendants() under Quadtree.as, you will notice that the first line is var max:int = 0; When it should be var max:int = colliders.length; No wonder that a newly inserted collider will not be able to see the colliders that belong to the nodes below it (nodes that belong to the ...


4

You have a nice solution (an item->node index) for dealing with the usual problem with update methods that arises from the need to remove with the old bounding box and insert with the new bounding box. The insert method is O(ln(N)) but an update where the item stays in the same node could be accomplished in constant time. Moving to a child node could also ...


4

Find the smallest square with your search point at the center and exactly one other point inside that rectangle (you need to do logn number of searches). Let x be the distance to the other point. Then find all the points within a square whose side is 2x and centered around your first point. For each point within this square, calculate the distance from ...



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