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72

Update I've found a better method that uses the new iOS 7 snapshot API whenever possible. The magic is here: [window drawViewHierarchyInRect:window.bounds afterScreenUpdates:YES]; I hope it helps. + (UIImage *)screenshot { CGSize imageSize = CGSizeZero; UIInterfaceOrientation orientation = [UIApplication ...


67

I can at least show you a shortcut for drawing circles of arbitrary size. No OpenGL, no Core Graphics drawing needed. Import the QuartzCore framework to get access to the .cornerRadius property of your UIView or UIImageView. #import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h> Also manually add it to your project's Frameworks folder. Add this method to your view ...


31

Ok well I will try to make a rather lengthy answer short: it depends. Now for a few longer thoughts and explanations - this is long. If you won't read it to the end, make sure you read the last few sentences. First I need to clarify that the "technologies" or API's you have listed are mostly concerned solely with graphics (except UIKit which also handles ...


25

I was able to solve this with Jon Steinmetz suggestion. If any one cares, here's the final solution : int radius = myRect.size.width; UIBezierPath *path = [UIBezierPath bezierPathWithRoundedRect:CGRectMake(0, 0, self.mapView.bounds.size.width, self.mapView.bounds.size.height) cornerRadius:0]; UIBezierPath *circlePath = [UIBezierPath ...


24

The response to this question is this one. Lets say you have a stretchable image which stretches only in width and has the height fixed (for simplicity sake). The image is 31px width ( 15px fixed size - doesn't stretch -, 1px will be stretched) Assuming your layer is a CALayer subclass your init method should look like this: - (id)init { self = ...


23

This is an easy way to get textfield from UISearchBar subview hierarchy and set its properties as needed like UITextField *txfSearchField = [searchbar valueForKey:@"_searchField"]; [txfSearchField setBackgroundColor:[UIColor whiteColor]]; [txfSearchField setLeftView:UITextFieldViewModeNever]; [txfSearchField ...


18

I just found this answer and it worked perfect with me. I'm just quoting it here.. " In iOS 5 and up, there is absolutely no need to subclass - you can do it all from Interface Builder. Select the UIView you want to modify. Go to the Identity Inspector. In "User Defined & Runtime Attributes", add "layer.cornerRadius" in Key Path, Type ...


16

Add the QuartzCore framework in your project Include this in your .h file #import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h>


16

EDIT October 3. 2013 Updated to support the new super fast drawViewHierarchyInRect:afterScreenUpdates: method in iOS 7. No. CALayer's renderInContext: is as far as I know the only way to do this. You could create a UIView category like this, to make it easier for yourself going forward: UIView+Screenshot.h #import <UIKit/UIKit.h> @interface ...


15

Here is code that will draw 3 stars in a horizontal line, the stars are not rotated and it is not pretty but it may help you: -(void)drawRect:(CGRect)rect { int aSize = 100.0; float color[4] = { 0.0, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0 }; // Blue CGColorRef aColor = CGColorCreate(CGColorSpaceCreateDeviceRGB(), color); CGContextRef context = ...


15

Yes, <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h> is automatically included, but this seems to be more a side effect than intended, because it is included only indirectly: <UIKit/UIKit.h> includes <UIKit/UISlider.h>, in the iOS 7 SDK, <UIKit/UISlider.h> includes <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h>, due to new instance variables in the UISlider class (of ...


12

Unfortunately font size is not an animatable property of NSView. In order to scale a UILabel, you'll need to use more advanced Core Animation techniques, using CAKeyframeAnimation: Import the QuartzCore.framework into your project, and #import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h> in your code. Create a new CAKeyframeAnimation object that you can add your key ...


12

One way to accomplish this is to use a mask layer. You can find the Apple documentation here. Here are a couple of interesting looking examples here and here. Basically you create a second CALayer whose alpha channel acts as a mask for the layer it is assigned as the mask of. In your case where you want a hole in the middle of an otherwise filled layer you ...


11

You can animate a layer through one (or more) full rotations around its Z axis by animating the layer's transform.rotation key path, like this: CABasicAnimation *animation = [CABasicAnimation animationWithKeyPath:@"transform.rotation"]; animation.duration = .25; animation.fromValue = [NSNumber numberWithFloat:0]; animation.toValue = [NSNumber ...


11

You can add this method to a UIView category and reuse as needed. It applies a linear black gradient from "theColor" to transparent to the given view. You should have QuartzCore.framework in your project in order to use the CAGradientLayer object. + (void)addLinearGradientToView:(UIView *)theView withColor:(UIColor *)theColor ...


9

Because importing a header is in no way connected to linking against a library. You will need to add QuartzCore Framework to the list libraries that your target links against. Why does Xcode not do that automatically? Well, the headers you are importing are actually part of that framework. So Xcode would have to scan through all of its frameworks, ...


8

Similar to what was done in the Cocoanetics post you link to, you can create a CAGradientLayer to cover your scroll view. Make it fade out to the left, right, top and bottom edges, using the background color of your scroll view (in my example, white): CGColorRef innerColor = [UIColor colorWithWhite:1.0 alpha:0.0].CGColor; CGColorRef outerColor = ...


7

This is pretty easy to do in Core Animation. I've used some pretty boring static values for this example, so obviously you'll want to make some modifications. But this will show you how to move a view along a circular UIBezierPath. UIView *view = [UIView new]; [view setBackgroundColor:[UIColor redColor]]; [view setBounds:CGRectMake(0.0f, 0.0f, 50.0f, ...


6

The problem is I've didn't push the context ctx, I was trying push & pop. so the solution is as simple as putting this line in the if statement in drawInContext UIGraphicsPushContext(ctx); Everything works.


6

You're on the right track with the shape layer. But you should have two different layers. First the mask layer as in your first example which masks your view (cuts off areas you don't want to be visible) Then you add the shape layer too, but not as mask layer. Also, make sure to not use borderWidth and borderColor, but stroke. // // Create your mask first ...


6

Just you need to make a rect of the area you want to be captured and pass the rect in the method. -(UIImage *)captureScreenInRect:(CGRect)captureFrame { CALayer *layer; layer = self.view.layer; UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(self.view.bounds.size); CGContextClipToRect (UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext(),captureFrame); [layer ...


5

The easiest way to handle this is to embed the table view inside a UIView, and set the shadow on the UIView.


5

I have a feeling drawRect is different that normal methods and is not getting the scope of the class correctly No, there is nothing special about -drawRect:. There are two possibilities: 1. Your -init method is not being called. You didn't say how this view gets created -- if you are manually calling [[DartBoard alloc] init], or if it is getting ...


5

The special-purpose CALayers like CAReplicatorLayer or CAGradientLayer are able (via private APIs) do execute their drawing directly on the GPU using fast filling or copying. In a sense they are different such that the backing store is not in normal RAM, but directly on the GPU.


5

Rob is right about renderInContext: being the right method to use here. Render in context does actually render the layer's pixel data into a context. Here's a sample application that will draw 10,000 layers on a background thread... The application does the following: Create's a UIView Adds 10,000 layers to that view's layer Rendering begins when you ...


5

If you want a single pixel (not point) line always, you'll have to use a different border width depending on the scale of the screen. E.g.: CGFloat scale = [[UIScreen mainScreen] scale]; if (scale == 2.0) { // retina screen; self.layer.borderWidth = 0.5; } else { // non-retina screen self.layer.borderWidth = 1.0; }


5

Here's an algorithm to implement what buddhabrot implied: - (void)drawStarInContext:(CGContextRef)context withNumberOfPoints:(NSInteger)points center:(CGPoint)center innerRadius:(CGFloat)innerRadius outerRadius:(CGFloat)outerRadius fillColor:(UIColor *)fill strokeColor:(UIColor *)stroke strokeWidth:(CGFloat)strokeWidth { CGFloat arcPerPoint = 2.0f * ...


5

iOS 7 introduced a new method that allows you to draw a view hierarchy into the current graphics context. This can be used to get an UIImage very fast. Implemented as category method on UIView: - (UIImage *)pb_takeSnapshot { UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.bounds.size, NO, [UIScreen mainScreen].scale); [self ...


5

From Apple docs: Use of this method is discouraged in iOS 4.0 and later. Instead, you should use the animateWithDuration:delay:options:animations:completion: method to specify your animations and the animation options.: [UIView animateWithDuration:1.f delay:0 options:UIViewAnimationOptionBeginFromCurrentState ...


5

Have you seen the application Paint Code it's a drawing package that allows you to draw any image then it writes the objective C code to draw it !



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