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41

Quaternion q; vector a = crossproduct(v1, v2) q.xyz = a; q.w = sqrt((v1.Length ^ 2) * (v2.Length ^ 2)) + dotproduct(v1, v2) Don't forget to normalize q Richard is right about there not being a unique rotation, but the above should give the "shortest arc". Which is probably what you need.


21

It sounds like you want the inverse of Q1 times Q2. Transforming by the inverse of Q1 will rotate the object back to its original frame (the initial orientation, as you say), and then transforming by Q2 will rotate it to its new orientation. Note that the standard definition of a quaternion applies transformations in a right-to-left multiplication order, so ...


17

The following code is based on a quaternion (qw, qx, qy, qz), where the order is based on the Boost quaternions: boost::math::quaternion<float> quaternion; float qw = quaternion.R_component_1(); float qx = quaternion.R_component_2(); float qy = quaternion.R_component_3(); float qz = quaternion.R_component_4(); First you have to normalize the ...


16

Half-Way Vector Solution I came up with the solution that I believe Imbrondir was trying to present (albeit with a minor mistake, which was probably why sinisterchipmunk had trouble verifying it). Given that we can construct a quaternion representing a rotation around an axis like so: q.w == cos(angle / 2) q.x == sin(angle / 2) * axis.x q.y == sin(angle / ...


15

The solution should be pretty straightforward, and shouldn't require quarternions. The axis of rotation to get from Normal1 to Normal2 must be orthogonal to both, so just take their vector cross-product. The amount of rotation is easily derived from their dot-product. This value is |A|.|B|.cos(theta), but as the two normal vectors should be normalised it ...


12

They have a smaller memory footprint than rotation matrices and they are more efficient than both matrix and angle/axis representations. Also: It's extremely easy to interpolate between two quaternions, which is useful for smooth camera movements etc. Unit normalisation of floating point quaternions suffers from fewer rounding defects than matrix ...


12

A quaternion has 4 components, which can be related to an angle θ and an axis vector n. The rotation will make the object rotate about the axis n by an angle θ. For example, if we have an cube like ______ |\ 6 \ | \_____\ z |5 | | : y ^ \ | 4 | \| \|____| +--> x Then a rotation of 90° about the axis (x=0, y=0, z=1) ...


12

Think of it this way QInitial * QTransition = QFinal solve for QTransition by multiplying both sides by QInitial^{-1} (^{-1} being the quaternion conjugate) QTransition = QFinal * QInitial^{-1} It's just that easy. note to @Dan Park - if you disagree with my math, please post a response to my answer, don't change the math. As far as I know, it's ...


12

You can multiply two quaternions together to produce a third quaternion that is the result of the two rotations. Note that quaternion multiplication is not commutative, meaning order matters (if you do this in your head a few times, you can see why). You can produce a quaternion that represents a rotation by a given angle around a particular axis with ...


12

The shortest possible summary is that a quaternion is just shorthand for a rotation matrix. Whereas a 4x4 matrix requires 16 individual values, a quaternion can represent the exact same rotation in 4. For the mathematically inclined, I am fully aware that the above is super over-simplified. To provide a little more detail, let's refer to the Wikipedia ...


11

I spent the other day trying to find the exact same thing for an animation editor; here is how I did it: Take the axis you want to find the rotation around, and find an orthogonal vector to it. Rotate this new vector using your quaternion. Project this rotated vector onto the plane the normal of which is your axis The acos of the dot product of this ...


11

Yes, it is normal. There are 2 ways to represent the same rotation with Euler angles. I personally don't like Euler angles, they mess up the stability of your app. I would avoid them. Plus, they are not very handy either.


10

The quaternion doesn't represent a direction, it represents a rotation. You can define a vector that points in the direction that your camera is pointing initially (e.g. (0,0,1)) and transform it using the rotation represented by the quaternion.


10

All you have done is effectively implement Euler angles with quaternions. That's not helping. The problem with Euler angles is that, when you compute the matrices, each angle is relative to the rotation of the matrix that came before it. What you want is to take an object's current orientation, and apply a rotation along some axis, producing a new ...


10

SSE (and SIMD in general) works really well when you're performing the same operations on a large number of elements, where there's no dependencies between operations. For example, if you had an array of double and needed to do array[i] = (array[i] * K + L)/M + N; for each element then SSE/SIMD would help. If you're not performing the same operations on a ...


9

Multiplying quaternions is going to suffer from accumulation of floating-point roundoff issues (even simple angles like 45 degrees won't be exact). It's a great way to composite rotations, but the precision of each of your quaternion components is going to drop-off over time. The bleed-through is one side-effect, a visually worse one though is your ...


8

You can easily build rotation matrices out of unit quaternions. Given a unit quaternion a + bi + cj + dk, you can build the following 3x3 matrix: Add the last line and column taken from the identity 4x4 matrix, glMultMatrix and you're done :)


7

There's Eigen, a templated library of math and geometry stuff used in Blender and by KDE programs, which has a slick Quaternion class defined in a single .h file. Info at http://eigen.tuxfamily.org/index.php?title=Main%5FPage and http://www.ohloh.net/p/5393


7

One way to do it, which is pretty easy to visualize, is to apply the rotation specified by your quaternion to the basis vectors (1,0,0), (0,1,0), and (0,0,1). The rotated values give the basis vectors in the rotated system relative to the original system. Use these vectors to form the rows of the rotation matrix. The resulting matrix, and its transpose, ...


7

I'm a fan of the Irrlicht quaternion class. It is zlib licensed and is fairly easy to extract from Irrlicht: Irrlicht Quaternion Documentation quaternion.h


7

The quaternion representation of rotation is a variation on axis and angle. So if you rotate by r radians around axis x, y, z, then your quaternion q is: q[0] = cos(r/2); q[1] = sin(r/2)*x; q[2] = sin(r/2)*y; q[3] = sin(r/2)*z; If you want to create a quaternion that only rotates around the y axis, you zero out the x and z axes and then re-normalize the ...


7

You would need to convert the axis angle rotation to Euler angles. Here is a link explaining this process in some detail with code: http://www.euclideanspace.com/maths/geometry/rotations/conversions/angleToEuler/index.htm From the article: yaw = atan2(y * sin(angle)- x * z * (1 - cos(angle)) , 1 - (y2 + z2 ) * (1 - cos(angle))) ...


7

You're approaching this the wrong way. If you have three Euler angle rotations for the X, Y, and Z axes, turning them into a quaternion and then into a matrix won't help you. Gimbal lock arises because of the representation of your desired rotation. If you store the rotation that you want as X-Y-Z Euler angles, then you will get Gimbal lock. You need to ...


7

It seems to me that "Roll" shouldn't be possible given the way you form your view matrix. Regardless of all the other code (some of which does look a little funny), the call D3DXMatrixLookAtLH(&m_oViewMatrix, &oEyePos, &oTarget, &oUpVector); should create a matrix without roll when given [0,1,0] as an 'Up' vector unless oTarget-oEyePos ...


6

You could try with Boost - usually good place to start with. They have a dedicated sublibrary for that. As for the examples look at the documentation and the unit tests that come along with Boost.


6

A quaternion in general is an extension of a complex number into 4 dimensions. So no, they are not just x, y, and z, and an angle, but they're close. More below... Quaternions can be used to represent rotation, so they're useful for graphics: Unit quaternions provide a convenient mathematical notation for representing orientations and rotations of ...


6

In order to "divide" with a quaternion, you invert it so that it's the opposite rotation. In order to invert a quaternion, you negate either the w component or the (x, y, z) components, but not both since that would leave you with the same quaternion you started with (a fully negated quaternion represents the same rotation). Then, remember that ...


6

I do not think there is a built in Matlab function to perform what you want. However, there is a function in the Mathworks user community which I believe is what you are looking for. spinCalc This will convert between the various rotation types DCM, Euler angles, Euler vectors, and Quaternions. Please note this comment from the above post regarding ...


6

As a rule of thumb, it is best not to mess with the object.matrix directly, and instead just set the object position, rotation, and scale. Let the library handle the matrix manipulations. You need to have matrixAutoUpdate = true;. To handle the rotation part, first get the tangent to the curve. tangent = spline.getTangent( t ).normalize(); You want to ...



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