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3

well, quaternions represent rotation around an axis, so the rotation is in the plane orthogonal to this axis, no ?


2

You can apply a Kalman filter to accelerometer data, it's a powerful technique though and there are lots of ways to do it wrong. If your goal is to learn about the filter then go for it - the discussion here might be helpful. If you just want to smooth the data and get on with the next problem then you might want to start with a moving average filter, or ...


2

Use RotateAround. // Rotate around world y. transform.RotateAround(transform.position, Vector3.up, angle); // Rotate around local y. transform.RotateAround(transform.position, transform.up, angle); You may found other useful stuff in Transform documentation anyway.


2

Your example is almost identical to the example Matrix3f m; m = AngleAxisf(0.25*M_PI, Vector3f::UnitX()) * AngleAxisf(0.5*M_PI, Vector3f::UnitY()) * AngleAxisf(0.33*M_PI, Vector3f::UnitZ()); Have you tried printing the result of that combined rotation matrix? I will bet it is diagonal 1,1,1 when the angles are zero. I'm confused about your use of ...


2

There's a reason why all those tutorials point to rotational matrices: in 3D you can't perform simultaneous rotations one by one, you need to perform them at once. Since JavaFX only uses one angle and one axis, you have to provide the way to convert three rotations over three axes in just one angle and one axis. A while ago I went to all the math behind ...


1

There is an exact correspondence between 3x3 rotation matrices and unit quarternions, up to a sign change in the quarternion (the sign is irrelevant when in comes to performing rotation on 3D vectors). This means that given two quarternions, q1, q2, and their corresponding matrices, m1, m2, the action of the quarternions on a vector v is the same as the ...


1

I think it's possible to do what you want very quickly and efficiently. First thing, you should complete each orthonormal pair of vectors into an orthonormal basis. The obvious way to do so is by taking the cross product of the first two vectors. Order matters: if you want u0 to map to v0 and u1 to map to v1, then form the orthonormal basis {u0,u1,u2} where ...


1

At the end of the day, I want my object (Polygon in SharpGL terms) to rotate about its own axes (or about the "world" axes, but be consistent). I think this answer you put in your question is somehow explaining the situation. In order to perform rotation around object axis: 1. Perform Translation/Rotation to your object and make the object axis ...


1

The most perfect answer has come to me after a lot of googling and experimentation: Disregard original ideas, acquire matrices! B.Matrix * Invert(A.Matrix) is stored as a relative marker, And then to restore, simply replace B's matrix with relative * A.MATRIX. This perfectly adjusts both rotation and position in one all-mighty swoop. I have no idea how to ...


1

You can use Quaternion.FromToRotation to calculate offset, something like: var offset = Quaternion.FromToRotation(Vector3.up, imuUp); transform.rotation *= offset;



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