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14

You are doing everything right. Basically, before you can use quicklisp, you need to load it (currently, it's not bundled with SBCL, although it may change in the future). There are various ways to do it. For example, you can load your .sbclrc with the quicklisp init: #!/usr/bin/sbcl --script (load ".sbclrc") (load "my-program.lisp") (in-package ...


13

It's been a tricky problem, and there have been several attempted solutions. I recently did a survey of Common Lisp users, and most of them simply manage libraries by hand by downloading project archives and checking things out of git, cvs, svn, etc. The next most popular method of library management is a program called "asdf-install". See ...


12

In your asd file, you should define the depends realtion as below:'' (asdf:defsystem #:aserve :serial t :depends-on (#:hunchentoot :hunchentoot-cgi #::bordeaux-threads #:parenscript) ...) After then you just need to (ql:quickload :aserve) .


11

You confuse two separate notions: a system and a package. A package is defined by Common Lisp standard and it's a collection of symbols, a way to control their visibility and usage. A system is not defined by the standard, it's a notion introduced by ASDF, which is a collection of metadata to manage files inter-dependencies in a single project in order to be ...


10

Use quickproject (accessible via (ql:quickload :quickproject)) to create a system for your application. As z_axis described, you can then fill the list of dependencies in the defsystem declaration (if you missed any when you called quickproject:make-project). If you create your new project in the local-projects path of you Quicklisp installation, you can ...


10

For anyone who's having a similar problem, I've found a solution: (with-open-file (*standard-output* "/dev/null" :direction :output :if-exists :supersede) (ql:quickload "my-package")) Not sure if it will work on all interpreters, but it works well with CLisp.


9

The "closure-html" project (available in Quicklisp) will recover from bogus HTML and produce something with which you can work. I use closure-html together with CXML to process arbitrary web pages, and it works nicely. http://common-lisp.net/project/closure/closure-html/


7

Creating a dedicated version of core image is a good option. You may: load quicklisp and sb-ext:save-lisp-and-die in a new image. You write a shell/bat script named, say qlsbcl, like this: sbcl --core <my-new-image-full-path-location> "$@" grab clbuild2 at http://gitorious.org/clbuild2 and run clbuild lisp. You'll have to symlink clbuild to a ...


7

If you use Quicklisp you can use the dedicated directory ~/quicklisp/local-projects/ which is scanned before the others directories. To use it, just put your project or a symbolic link. (quickproject:make-project "~/quicklisp/local-projects/my-new-website/" :depends-on '(restas parenscrit cl-who)) (quickproject:make-project "~/src/lisp/my-cool-gui/" ...


7

Source + Full Story Long story short, packages are bags of symbols and systems describe relationships between files and other systems. So, using your structure here is a simple system definition: (asdf:defsystem #:spam-filter :serial t :description "Simple Spam Filter" :author "PCL" :depends-on (#:cl-ppcre ...


7

In SBCL, --script does not load your init files. If you want to use Quicklisp, you have to arrange to load it. That usually means something like (load "~/quicklisp/setup.lisp") before using anything related to Quicklisp. I don't think SBCL and Quicklisp are a great fit for scripting tasks. When I write scripts, I don't normally expect them to fetch stuff ...


7

Your loading command, sbcl ~~load quicklisp.lisp should be sbcl --load quicklisp.lisp Hyphens, not tildes. (This isn't just SBCL, mind you; it's the convention for just about all UNIX style command line arguments.) This doesn't cause any kind of error because, as Xach pointed out in the comments, SBCL passes arguments it doesn't understand to the ...


6

I used clisp 2.4.4 which was outdated for quicklisp, when I installed and use 2.4.9, the issue is gone. This is the site that I got hints - http://comments.gmane.org/gmane.lisp.clisp.general/13818


6

The first problem in your code is that you use apostrophe (’) instead of tick ('). That's why you get undefined variable error, as ’button is read as variable name (it's not quoted). Now regarding packages and systems. A package is defined with defpackage and it is a collection of symbols, which are used after the in-package form inside a file (or in ...


6

There isn't really a good way to do that. It's more part of the development environment than the deployment environment. I use buildapp to deploy CL programs, and there's a way for Quicklisp to export its index of systems and buildapp to load it. There's certainly room for improvement.


6

It fails because Lisp reads every form before executing it. And when it reads it, package cffi-grovel indeed does not exist yet, because cffi-grovel is loaded at execution time (whatever it means for form wrapped with eval-when). Try spliting the eval-when form into two eval-whens: ql:quickload and setf. Or write something like this: (setf (symbol-value ...


6

A system is a collection of files and sub-systems. One can compile or load such a system. There are also other operations possible. It keeps track of dependencies and tries to do a minimal amount of work. If you are using SBCL and CLISP, then ASDF is the tool to choose. See http://www.cliki.net/asdf ASDF provides, amongst other things, a DEFSYSTEM macro to ...


5

There isn't a way to do that, but I intend to add a way sometime soon.


5

You can list all packages with LIST-ALL-PACKAGES. If you keep them before and after loading software, you can compare them. CL-USER 14 > (setf *print-length* 10) 10 CL-USER 15 > (list-all-packages) (#<The SQL-COMMON package, 0/4 internal, 28/32 external> #<The QL-LISPWORKS package, 0/16 internal, 5/16 external> #<The QL-SETUP package, ...


5

In this code, there's something interesting going on: ;; test.lisp (asdf:load-system :helloworld) (defun main() (helloworld:start)) You can't compile it as a whole because, as you've noted trying to read the symbol hellowworld:start is a problem, because there's no helloworld package yet. To read the symbol, you at least need to have the package ...


4

As asdf:*central-registry* is not just one path, it is list of pathnames. You can simply do: (push "/path-to-your-project/" asdf:*central-registry*). If you use SBCL, you can add this line to ~/.sbclrc.


4

Quicklisp only installs ASDF systems. Then, if you look at the documentation of CL+SSL you can read: Note that you need the libssl-dev package on Debian to load this package without manual configuration. OpenSSL binaries for Windows may be found at http://www.slproweb.com/products/Win32OpenSSL.html (slproweb.com is a 3rd party; if you have questions about ...


4

I use a make script that generates a batteries-included core file, from the base SBCL/CCL core. That make file launches lisp with the default core, runs a lisp script that leverages quicklisp to load up a bunch of package goodness, and then exits and saves the core file. The script then places the updated core file in the correct location, so that the next ...


4

I don't know of a good solution to this problem. The solution I use is to not write scripts with Common Lisp; I usually write applications that I use interactively from CL sessions. When I do want to run things from the command-line, I use buildapp for it, and use ql:write-asdf-manifest-file to create a file to pass to --manifest-file for buildapp. I ...


4

Any project you put into the local-projects folder will override the Quicklisp-supplied version. That is the easiest way to use a modified version of a project. You can find out where Quicklisp gets a project by checking https://github.com/quicklisp/quicklisp-projects. For example, lispbuilder upstream info comes from ...


4

If Drakma is already installed in quicklisp, I think your example will work if you use --asdf-tree instead of --asdf-path. But using the Quicklisp directory as a tree can cause some trouble, as not every system file in the tree is meant to be loaded. There's another option that more closely integrates with Quicklisp's knowledge of available systems. Here's ...


4

:depends-on ((:version #:hunchentoot "1.2.18") #:cl-who) Note, that in current ASDF (version 3.1) that will be treated as version 1.2.18+ .


4

In common lisp, anything that's named (a variable, a function, a macro) is attached to a symbol. In this case, you have a function which is attached to the symbol make-pqueue. Symbols are separated from each other using packages. This keeps collisions to a minimum and also allows for things like internal variables/functions that aren't exported by the ...


3

There was a bug in ASDF that caused a problem like this. You might be able to recover by using (asdf:clear-system "<name>"). If that doesn't work, things should work fine if you restart.


3

I'm on 10.4, so I had to also install ffcall - I don't know if you installed it already. When installing clisp I added +dynffi to the end and it worked for me. sudo port install ffcall sudo port install clisp +dynffi



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