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0

The problem is in these two lines: quick_sort(a, i, pivot); quick_sort(a+i, max-i, pivot); Quicksort works by recursively sorting smaller and smaller portions of the array. Eventually, you get to the point where there is only one element in the array, which is the recursion base case. The problem is that the pivot value is getting passed down through ...


0

Your program is segfaulting because if you choose a hard pivot, like 2, for example, if quick_sort is called in a partition with only 2 items on the right of the array, a[2] will be out of bounds. I think the best option for your solution is to choose the pivot inside the function, either randomly or just getting any arbitrary value, like max/2. You just ...


0

Your partition function will do only one pass and it will stop for desc if the smallest is first. You assign it as pivot, mover it to last, calculate left==right, return length-1 and terminate. This looks like wrong implementation of quicksort


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One problem the implementation has is that it won't work if you have equal numbers (you will keep switching them with each other if it will be chosen as pivot). The other is in the recursion: if(pivot > left + 1) QuickSort_HighLow(arr, left, pivot - 1); if(pivot < right - 1) QuickSort_HighLow(arr, pivot + 1, right);


1

You have to sort the right subarray of {|5|5,9,6} (or {5|5|,9,6}) again. The median is 6 and the result will be {5,6,9} (or {6,9}). Also note that naive Quicksort with many duplicate keys can degrade to quadratic time complexity. There are ways to detect keys equal to the pivot and exclude them from the subarrays that are sorted recursively.


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I did two things to your code to get it to work: at beginning of method set j = right +1 and move v = arr.get(right) to after first if statement. Should look something like this: public static void sort(ArrayList<Integer> arr, int left, int right) { int i = left - 1; int j = right + 1; if (right - i == 0 || right - i == 1) ...


0

Partial answer for modified question: Let's assume that Ai1,...,Aim is not intersected with the initial (random) array start, but with the first m values of the correctly sorted array Aj1,...,Ajn. (which seems to be more interesting) Let us further assume that the comparator C is non-deterministic. And for simplicity we assume all array elements are ...


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Hm, if A1,A2,...,An are in random order (as stated in the question), then all that sorting and probability of correctness of Comparator C does not really matter. The question is then reduced to the expectation of the length of intersection of two random subsets, each of size m, of {A1,...,An}. The probability that S is k is then (m k)*((n-m) (n-k))/(n m), ...


2

You can avoid stack overflows without changing your algorithm too much. The trick is to tail-call optimize on the largest partition and only use recursion on the smallest one. This usually means your have to change your if to a while. I can't really test java code right now, but it should look something like: public void quickSort(ArrayList<String> ...


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In your partition method you sometimes use a element outside the range: String string1 = data.get(firstIndex); String string2 = data.get((firstIndex + (numberToPartition - 1)) / 2); String string3 = data.get(firstIndex + numberToPartition - 1); (firstIndex + (numberToPartition - 1)) / 2 is not index of the middle element. That would be (firstIndex + ...


2

The next step is partitioning: when you have selected a pivot, move all elements smaller than the pivot to the left and all elements larger to the right. Once this is done, you can separately sort on the left and on the right. Before partitioning: [2,6,3,1,6,5,2,4,8] After partitioning <6 on the left, >=6 on the right: [2,3,1,5,2,4] [6,6,8] To ...


1

So the medium of 2,6,8 is 6. What now? The next step is to partition the array into the left half, containing elements that are less than 6, and the right half, containing elements that are equal to or greater than 6. Then we call quicksort on each half. The following Java program implements quicksort, displaying each subarray before and after sorting. ...


-1

Here is a Video which visualize Quicksort. Have fun The Video Your Question does not belong here and it is simple to google it by yourself.


1

This should be enough: //Loop through the array and check if a[i] is less than pivot for(int i=l;i<r;i++){ if(a[i]<=pivot){ swap(a[i],a[p_index]); p_index++; } counter++; } swap(a[p_index],a[r]); p[0] = p_index; p[1] = counter; return p; As mentioned in the comments, swapping is not a comparison. Also, you only increased ...


1

Instead of waiting for termination of the entire executor service (which probably isn't what you want at all), you should save all the Futures returned by executor.submit() and wait until they're all done (by calling 'get()` on them for example). And though it's tempting to do this in the qsortParallelo() method, that would actually lead to a deadlock by ...


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You are calling executor.awaitTermination inside a Thread which was launched by your executor. Thread will not stop until executor comes out of the awaitTermination and executor will not come out of awaitTermination until the Thread terminates. You need to move this code: try { executor.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.DAYS); } catch (InterruptedException e) ...


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Assuming that your programming language of choice is relatively efficient then using a letter tree (not a binary tree - the fanout should be the size of the character set) populated from a FSM to store the counts would likely be the lowest cost solution.


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The mistake in this code is simply the while-loop in qsortParallelo. first and last are never modified. Apart from that you don't need the while-loop, since you already do that the further sorting in the executor. And you'll need to start another task for the second half of the array.


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Mafalda, you could use insertion-sort with quick-sort , for example . Quicksort might be the best approach. You might want to check this link why-is-quicksort-better-than-other-sorting-algorithms-in-practice


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here is another option, little bit more similar to the original one int partition(int arr[], int left, int right) { int pivot = arr[left]; while (left != right) { if (arr[left] > arr[right]) { swap(arr[left], arr[right]); } if (pivot == arr[left]) right--; else // Pivot == ...


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Your swap function will not work if both pointers point to the same element. If they do the second step *y = (*x) - (*y); sets the element to 0, since it is equivalent to *x = (*x) - (*x); The second swap function with the temp variable preserves the values. At a glance it looks like swap(&a[indice_pivot],&a[dx]); could be hitting the same element. ...


1

Swap(...) Signed integer overflow is undefined which can occur with sufficiently large *x and *y. Absolutely nobody can easily tell if the code implementing swap() is correct. Partition(...) If i == j, your swap() function will not work correctly. This is because inside swap() we will have x == y and your logic does not handle that case.


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I have seemingly solved the problem simply by calling: omp_set_nested(1); The documentation is little bit unclear about this requirement. Moreover, I would expect that the library is able to perform the call by itself. Hopefully, this will help also someone else.


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Quick sort with random pivots has a space complexity Average case = O(logN) Worst case = O(N) The worst case arises when the sort is not balanced. However it can be avoided by sorting the smaller sub-arrays first and then tail-recursing on the larger array. This improved version will have a worst case space complexity of O(logN). Note that the tail ...


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Like Thorsten mentioned in the comments section, you have described bubble sort. Modified from Wikipedia, pseudocode for bubble sort is as follows: procedure bubbleSort( A : list of sortable items ) n = length(A) for i = 1 to n inclusive do // Outer Loop for j = 1 to n-1-i inclusive do /* if this pair is out of order */ if A[j] > ...


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Quicksort normally uses O(log n) extra memory, stored on the stack. It's not O(n), because the binary tree is never explicit in memory, we just do a post-order traversal of it (that is: only one path in the tree is ever stored at a given time). Mergesort is listed as O(n) because we usually copy the result of the merge into a new array. In-place sorting is ...


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Stack space for the recursion. i.e. you don't need to store any additional data, but you need to store the return addresses (EDIT: and other associated information as applicable to the language in question, thanks @dmaij for the reminder) for each recursive subcall. Since Quicksort generates a stack of depth log(n), you will need as many stack frames ...


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The reason that you get stack overflow exception is because you call method QuickSort1 in QuickSort1 and there is a limit when you implement recursive function like that. You can increase your call stack size using -Xss command line arg like: java -Xss4m


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I think you should check the case nums.size() == 0 and not nums.size() == 1 in the beginning. if(nums.size() == 0) {return nums;} Also, I think that you should write long left[m]; long right[n]; And why don't you use exclusively vectors ? Using C-like arrays seems more like a way to look for troubles here.


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I have implemented a merge sort algorithm, you can have a look. I malloc a bak array at the beginning of mergeSort and every merge use the it afterwards. #include <string> #include <stdlib.h> void _mergeSort(int *array, int *bakArray, int len) ; void mergeSort(int *array, int len) { int *bak = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int)*len) ; ...


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You've implemented a version of quicksort that's doing everything "in-place" while your mergesort copies the content of left/right upon every recursive call (and same thing with merge()). That's probably the major reason for the differences. Second, like Luiggi mentioned in the comments above - how do you do your benchmarking ? do you get a proper JVM ...


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What is given in your textbook is similar to the pivot-based concept except that they haven't mentioned this terminology over there. But,anyways the concepts are the same. What's the best way to find a "pivot" for a list? There's not a fixed way of selecting pivotal-element. You can select any of the element of the array---first,second,last,etc. It can ...


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Theoretically - choosing the median element as the pivot guarantees least number of recursive calls, and guarantees Theta(nlogn) running time. However, finding this median is done with selection algorithm - and if you want to guarantee selection takes linear time - it needs median of medians algorithm, which has poor constants. If you chose the first (or ...


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Your problem is your SelectionSort, it eventually throws an "Arithmetic operation resulted in an overflow" when I debugged it. Are you required to write your own sort? VB.Net already has built in libraries that can do what you want. You can use Array.Sort(TheList) for example. Module Module1 Dim TheList(20) As Integer Sub Main() ...


0

B(n) = O(n * lg(n)) W(n) = O(n^2) 1) B(n) < W(n) implying B(n) = O(W(n)). 2) B(n) = Theta(W(n)) equals to W(n) = O(B(n)). As before B(n) < W(n), therefore W(n) is not bounded by B(n), making 2nd statement incorrect. Solution is B, first statement is true and the second is false.


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This should work (will check for correctness in a bit, it works!): EDIT: I previously made a mistake in error checking. I forgot to add 2 more conditions, here is the amended code. public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception { int b[] = {10, 9, 8, 7, 7, 7, 7, 3, 2, 1}; sort(b,0,b.length-1); ...


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There is another question with the same issue, you can see it here, but anyways I think Arrays.sort() is going to help you.


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When preforming a Quicksort I strongly suggest making a separate method for partitioning to make the code easier to follow (I'll show an example below). On top of this a good way of avoiding worst case run time is shuffling the array you're sorting prior to preforming the quick sort. Also I used the first index as the partitioning item instead of the last. ...


0

It looks like LINQ uses the quick sort algorithm for the OrderBy method (see previous StackOverflow question). Something like this should take care of it for you: DateTime[] datesOfBirth = new DateTime[] { new DateTime(1955, 10, 28), new DateTime(1955, 2, 24) }; String[] firstNames = new String[] { "William", "Steve" }; String[] lastNames = new String[] { ...


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WifiData should implement Comparable<WifiData> interface by comparing the SSID of this and other. The signature of your method would then become: public Comparable[] qsort(Comparable[] array, int left, int right) and the implementation will be more abstract, so: String pivot=array[(ll+rr)/2].getSSID(); will become: Comparable ...


0

Here's a sample Comparator I wrote to sort multi-dimensional arrays by their first element: private static class FirstItemComparator implements Comparator<int[]> { public int compare(int[] first, int[] second) { if (first[0] < second[0]) { return -1; } else if (first[0] == second[0]) { ...


1

I think the more appropriate option will be to create a new class with all different 6 kind of properties public class myClass { public DateTime date{get;set;} public string name{get;set;} //.... } Then create a single array/list of that class. public List<myClass> arrData; Now you can sort that array based on any of your desired ...


1

Likely you have a setup something like this: DateTime [] dates; string [] names; int [] ids; //...etc Consider instead to condense your data into a single object, then have a single array of that object: public class MyObject { DateTime date { get; set; } string name { get; set; } int id { get; set; } } Now you will only have 1 array: ...


2

There are two obvious errors in your code. First, if at any time the pivot is the smallest or the largest value (and that will happen at some time if the values are random), you leave the partition you're working on. If the partition is the first or the last, this may result in undefined behavior, but in any case, it will not give the right results. ...


1

This line is wrong: sortShit(left, intVec.size() - 1); Some other branch of the recursion is responsible for sorting between rightValue+1 and intVec.size()-1. You only need to recurse using sortShit(left, rightValue); which restores the invariant that recursive calls are always on successively smaller sets, and therefore terminate. Your call allows ...


0

The x++ and y-- to skip exchanges need to be in while loops so that exchange happens only when it is called for.


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From the theoretical point of view, there should be no big difference: quicksort has an expected complexity of O(n log n) for random choice of the pivot element, but in worst case it could be up to O(n²). mergesort has a fixed complexity of O(n log n) I know that a professor of mine and his work group is sorting big sets of data (> 100 GB) using ...


0

In your partition function, you need to consider the case where a[j]==x and the case where a[i]==x. In this case you can't just swap them and carry on as normal. Go through it on paper and you'll see the error. An example where this happens - consider the array: 1 3 4 5 2


0

I tried executing your program, and suggest a small change String pivot = givenArray[33] should be changed to String pivot = givenArray[right]; please find the below example: public class Triangle{ public static String[] quickSort(String[] givenArray, int left, int right) { int l = left; int r = right; //used to ...


0

I think there are much better implementations of quicksort, here is my attempt with commentary which will hopefully help you remember it better: public static void quickSort(int[] theArray, int left, int right) { //we declare 2 variables int i = left; int j = right; //we calculate a pivot, simply taking the middle value of the array ...



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