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5

I would approach this in two steps: 1) get unique elements per column and convert to list: l <- lapply(df, function(x) unique(unlist(strsplit(as.character(x), ";")))) 2) remove duplicates that appear in any previous columns for(i in seq_along(l)) { l[[i]] <- setdiff(l[[i]], unlist(l[seq_len(i-1L)])) } The reason why I use a list instead of a ...


4

The first line converts df to a list L. The second line creates a long form data frame long containing the values in column1 and the df column names in column 2 as a factor. The last line removes duplicates producing long0. No packages are used. L <- lapply(df, function(x) unlist(strsplit(as.character(x), ";"))) long <- transform(stack(L), ind = ...


4

I think you can do lapply(edges, function (x) sum(unlist(x))) This returns a list. Using sapply will simplify the result to a vector.


4

Based on your description, assign is technically correct, but recommending it is bad advice. If you are pulling in multiple rasters in a loop, best practice in R is to initialize a list to hold all the resulting rasters and name each list element accordingly. You can do this one at a time: # n is number of rasters raster_list <- vector("list",n) for (i ...


4

First let's look at the call tree: ttt <- "abs(str1*1e6)/(str2*str3)" library(pryr) call_tree(parse(text=ttt)) #\- () # \- `/ # \- () # \- `abs # \- () # \- `* # \- `str1 # \- 1e+06 # \- () # \- `( # \- () # \- `* # \- `str2 # \- `str3 See also Hadley's book. Now let's create this in a machine usable ...


4

If we transform the OP's data a bit to get library(data.table) data = setDT(structure(list(id = 1:10, date = structure(16801:16810, class = c("IDate", "Date")), date2 = structure(16801:16810, class = c("IDate", "Date" ))), .Names = c("id", "date", "date2"), row.names = c(NA, -10L ), class = c("data.table", "data.frame"), sorted = c("id", "date", "date2")))...


3

Try this, using get() to convert string to column name: col <- "Sepal.Width" iris[with(iris, order(Species, get(col), decreasing = TRUE)), ] And within shiny it should be: get(col()). Note that input$a is already reactive, so we can say: get(input$a)


3

We can use subset subset(df1, as.Date(day) > Sys.Date()-21)


3

We can also use base R v1 <- unlist(edges) tapply(v1, sub("\\..*", "", names(v1)), sum) # A B C #15 10 20 Or in a single step r1 <- tapply(unlist(edges), rep(names(edges), lengths(edges)), FUN = sum) r1 # A B C #15 10 20 if we need to sum based on the names after the . r2 <- tapply(v1, sub("[^.]+\\.", "", names(v1)), FUN = ...


3

You could just set the length for the arrows between different nodes: edges <- create_edges(from = c("Index", "Surveillance","Surveillance","Intervention", "Surveillance", "Index" ), to = c("Surveillance", "Intervention","Surveillance","Intervention", "Lost", "Lost"), rel = c(99, 6.7, 99, 99, 27, 22), ...


3

Using base R, you could do: # setDF(dfl) # run this first if you have a data.table merge(expand.grid(lapply(dfl[c("country", "death", "year")], unique)), dfl, all.x = TRUE) This first creates all combinations of the unique values in country, death, and year and then merges it to the original data, to add the values and where combinations were not in the ...


3

Product_Name <- c("English Muffins","croissants","Kaiser rolls","Bagels","cinnamon puff","strawberry pastry") Region_ID <- c(1:6) Transaction_year <- c(2011:2016) x <- data.frame() for(i in 1:6) { for (j in 1:6) { for(k in 1:6) { x <- rbind(x, data.frame(Product = Product_Name[i], Region = Region_ID[j], Year = ...


3

Yes, you can do this by using data.table and a by statement. Very similar to a SQL group-by: library(data.table) setDT(x)[,count := .N, by = c("Product","Region","Year") ] head(x) Product Region Year count 1: English Muffins 1 2011 1 2: English Muffins 1 2012 1 3: English Muffins 1 2013 1 4: English Muffins 1 2014 ...


3

There's no need for complicated code here. All you need is one line of code: > as.data.frame(table(x)) Product Region Year Freq 1 English Muffins 1 2011 1 2 croissants 1 2011 1 3 Kaiser rolls 1 2011 1 4 Bagels 1 2011 1 5 cinnamon puff 1 2011 1 6 strawberry ...


3

The base function as.data.frame.table will do this. I'm assuming you either have or can make an R contingency table along these lines: mt <- with(x, table(Product,Region,Year)) You then get the desired "long format" object with: str(as.data.frame(mt)) 'data.frame': 216 obs. of 4 variables: $ Product: Factor w/ 6 levels "English Muffins",..: 1 2 ...


3

In latest development version 1.9.7 you can find non-equi joins. Then you can just add V2 := 0 to your y dataset and proceed with non-equi join. y[, V2 := 0] x[y, V3 := i.V3, on=.(V1, V2>=V2)][] # V1 V2 V3 # 1: A -0.56047565 NA # 2: B -0.23017749 NA # 3: C 1.55870831 NA # 4: A 0.07050839 TRUE # 5: B 0.12928774 NA # 6: C ...


3

If you need speed, Rcpp is an option. A lot can be accomplished with the Rcpp library in combination with the C++ standard library. For example, here's how we can implement your requirement using std::strchr() to find the underscore, some array indexing, char comparisons, and a ternary chain: library(Rcpp); cppFunction(includes='#include <cstring>',' ...


2

We can try with dplyr/tidyr library(dplyr) library(tidyr) DF1 %>% gather(House, Val, Apartment:Condo) %>% filter(Val!="") %>% gather(Animals, Val2, Cat:Fish) %>% group_by(House, Animals) %>% summarise_each(funs(sum(.!='')), Val:Val2) %>% spread(Animals, Val2) %>% select(-Val) # House Cat Dog ...


2

Suppose you simply don't know the size of the data.frame in advance. It can well be a few rows, or a few millions. You need to have some sort of container, that grows dynamically. Taking in consideration my experience and all related answers in SO I come with 4 distinct solutions: rbindlist to the data.frame Use data.table's fast set operation and couple ...


2

We can use lapply to loop over the list, remove the last row (x[-nrow(x),]), and create a new column with the first cell value. lst1 <- lapply(lst, function(x) transform(x[-nrow(x),], NewCol = x[1,1]))


2

We can paste 'desc' as a string to evaluate it. myCol1 <- paste0("desc(", "x)") df1 %>% arrange_(.dots = c("grp", myCol1)) # grp x #1 1 6.16 #2 1 3.39 #3 1 2.82 #4 2 9.17 #5 2 4.35 Or with 'myCol' df1 %>% arrange_(.dots = c("grp", paste0("desc(", myCol, ")"))) Or use lazyeval library(lazyeval) df1 %>% ...


2

Just to fill in two additional possibilities (that are nearly identical to one another in terms of syntax and quite similar to @akrun's use of subset). You can use with in as follows to shorten the number of characters: with(df, df[as.Date(day) > Sys.Date()-21,]) As you mentioned a desire to see other packages, here is one way to drop old ...


2

V1 <- letters[1:4] V2 <- as.character(c(1,10,2,3)) df <- data.frame(V1,V2, stringsAsFactors=FALSE) df[order(as.numeric(df[,2])),] gives V1 V2 1 a 1 3 c 2 4 d 3 2 b 10 But V1 <- letters[1:4] V2 <- as.character(c(1,10,2,3)) df <- data.frame(V1,V2) df[order(as.numeric(df[,2])),] gives V1 V2 1 a 1 2 b 10 3 c 2 4 d 3 ...


2

We can try lst <- lapply(df, function(x) unique(unlist(strsplit(as.character(x), ";")))) lapply(seq_along(lst), function(i) { v1 <- unlist(lst[seq(i)]) setdiff(lst[[i]], v1[duplicated(v1)])}) #[[1]] #[1] "Q9ULV4" "Q6QEF8" "Q9H6F5" "Q9GZZ1" "Q9BWS9" #[[2]] #[1] "Q9UNZ5" "Q9H2K0" #[[3]] #[1] "Q9Y2W1" "Q9UKD2" "Q9NYF8"


2

I would do it in plain R based on the duplicate function in this way: lst <- lapply(df, function(x) unlist(strsplit(as.character(x), ";", fixed = TRUE))) cols <- colnames(df) seen_entries <- NULL for (i in (1:ncol(df))) { n_seen_before <- length(seen_entries) seen_entries <- c(seen_entries, lst[[cols[i]]]) lst[[cols[i]]] <- lst[[...


2

You need to use the par.strip.text= argument, which accepts a list with components specifying any of cex, font, lines, and lineheight (the latter giving the space between any multi-line strip titles). For example, try this: stripParams <- list(cex=2, lines=1.5) xyplot(a~b|c, data=dat, par.strip.text = stripParams, par.settings = list(strip....


2

Here is a longer base R method. You create two new data.frames, one that contains all combinations of the country, year, and death, and a second that contains an index key. # get data.frame with every combination of country, year, and death dfNew <- with(df, expand.grid("country"=unique(country), "year"=unique(year), "death"=...


2

If you try to use ggsave you get an error ggsave("ggpairs.jpg", pf, dpi=500) Saving 7 x 7 in image Error in UseMethod("grid.draw") : no applicable method for 'grid.draw' applied to an object of class "c('gg', 'ggmatrix')" So you can write you own grid.draw method for the ggpairs object class grid.draw.gg <- function(x){ print(x) } ...


2

This should work as long as your data are strings and not factors: for(i in 3:7){ j = data[,2]==data[,i] data[j,i] = data[j,1] }


2

Using a combination of lapply and ifelse, you can do: mydf[,3:7] <- lapply(mydf[,3:7], function(x) ifelse(x==mydf$V2, mydf$V1, x)) which gives: > mydf V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7 a F B C D F A T b R D C R F A T c A C A R F A T Or: newdf <- data.frame(sapply(mydf[,3:7], function(x) ifelse(x==mydf$V2, mydf$V1, x))) which gives:...



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