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14

Hygiene is often used in the context of macros. A hygienic macro doesn't use variable names that can risk interfering with the code under expansion. Here is an example. Let's say we want to define the or special form with a macro. Intuitively, (or a b c ... d) would expand to something like (let ((tmp a)) (if tmp a (or b c ... d))). (I am omitting the ...


10

See http://community.schemewiki.org/?scheme-faq-language question "Is there a way to emulate call-by-reference?". In general I think that fights against scheme's functional nature so probably there is a better way to structure the program to make it more scheme-like.


10

http://community.schemewiki.org/?R6RS has compiled a list of high level changes with some commentary, including: case sensitive syntax square brackets are now equivalent to parentheses (e.g., (let ([foo 3]) ...) - this was supported in some scheme implementations but is now part of the standard retaining the ability to return multiple values more escape ...


10

The usual idiom for that is (let () (define x 1) (display x)) which you can of course turn into a quick macro: (define-syntax-rule (block E ...) (let () E ...))


7

I can't speak for any other Schemes, but Racket has a procedure called system-type: > (system-type) 'unix > (system-type 'machine) "Linux ... x86_64 GNU/Linux" ;; ellipses mine, output is same as `uname -a`


7

You can use the "Language changes" sections in the standard documents themselves to compare them. Here are links to these sections in public HTML versions: R3RS -> R4RS R4RS -> R5RS R5RS -> R6RS


6

In short Racket letrec and R6RS letrec* is the same. The evaluation order is specified for these. In R5RS letrec the order is unspecified. Since the order of R5RS letrec is unspecified implementation can choose a fixed order (for example left to right) or they can let the compiler choose different orders for each use (in order to get faster code). From the ...


6

The easies to start with is a R5RS subset and it would be not too hard to make it a R7RS-small later. The R5RS is not very big so it's almost a digest on it's own. You can compare them by their language changes part of the different reports. R7RS-small even have a list both against R5RS and R6RS.


6

No, there is no such thing in R6RS. Some rare implementations might support something like that, but in the overwhelming majority (including eval in other languages!) this cannot be done. The reason for that is simple: it breaks compilation, since it leads to making two functions distinguishable based on local names, and in some cases can also prohibit ...


5

You can make the state local to the macro transformer: (define-syntax m (let () (define *count* 0) (define (get-count) *count*) (define (incr-count) (set! *count* (+ *count* 1))) (lambda (x) (syntax-case x () ((m) (begin (incr-count) (datum->syntax #'m (get-count)))))))) Edited to add: In Racket, you can also do this: ...


5

The most straightforward way is to use a simple "return" style continuation: (call/cc (lambda (return) (display 1) ... (return) (display "A"))) Does that help at all?


5

If you imagine that a macro is simply expanded into the place where it is used, then you can also imagine that if you use a variable a in your macro, there might already be a variable a defined at the place where that macro is used. This is not the a that you want! A macro system in which something like this cannot happen, is called hygienic. There are ...


5

You need a syntactic extension (a.k.a. macro) to prevent evaluation: #lang r6rs (import (rnrs)) (define-syntax f (syntax-rules () [(_ x) (display 'x)])) (define my-var 3) (f my-var) outputs my-var Racket's macro-expander shows the effects of the transformation: (module anonymous-module r6rs (#%module-begin (import (rnrs)) ...


4

From R6RS: The equal? predicate treats pairs and vectors as nodes with outgoing edges, uses string=? to compare strings, uses bytevector=? to compare bytevectors (see library chapter on “Bytevectors”), and uses eqv? to compare other nodes. In other words, your use of equal? is really just doing the same thing as eqv? since that's how it's specified for ...


4

Here's an example: (define-syntax (compare-with-x stx) (syntax-case stx () [(_ x-in) (with-syntax ([free=? (free-identifier=? #'x-in #'x)] [bound=? (bound-identifier=? #'x-in #'x)]) #'(list free=? bound=?))])) (define-syntax go (syntax-rules () [(go) (compare-with-x x)])) (go) ;; => '(#t #f) The x introduced ...


3

I'm so glad to know that this language is still being used! Hygienic code is code that when injected (via a macro) does not cause conflicts with existing variables. There is lots of good information on Wikipedia about this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hygienic_macro


3

It's hard to tell why, since it does appear to be unnecessary, but probably it's an optimisation to reduce the number of free variables that are referenced. In this case, p, v, and n become lexical variables of f, and no longer require free variable references. However, since the corresponding free variables are actually lexical variables of vector-map and ...


3

If you by "Standard Scheme (in the Racket IDE)" mean the Racket language (i.e. what you get when you prefix your code with #lang racket, then the top four differences to look out for is: - a different module system - a different macro system (depending on just how old your code is) - immutable cons-cells (unless you import mutable ones) - no one-armed ifs ...


3

Why not just (let ((x 1)) (display x))


3

Racket provides the block form, which works like this: #lang racket (require racket/block) (block (define x 1) (display x))


3

Like Jari said, usually you want to avoid passing by reference in Scheme as it suggests that you're abusing side effects. If you want to, though, you can enclose anything you want to pass by reference in a cons box. (cons 5 (void)) will produce a box containing 5. If you pass this box to a procedure that changes the 5 to a 6, your original box will also ...


3

http://www.r6rs.org/final/html/r6rs-lib/r6rs-lib-Z-H-3.html#node_sec_2.8 -- Procedure: bytevector-ieee-double-native-set! BYTEVECTOR K X -- Procedure: bytevector-ieee-double-set! BYTEVECTOR K X ENDIANNESS K, ..., K+7 must be valid indices of BYTEVECTOR. For `BYTEVECTOR-IEEE-DOUBLE-NATIVE-SET!', K must be a multiple of 8. These procedures ...


3

Every implementation tends to focus on something different. Racket emphasizes its large libraries as "batteries included", while Ikarus Scheme touts itself as compiling fast code. You should examine implementations based on what you want. If you're just learning Scheme, DrRacket is a good choice with its friendly interface and specific environments for ...


3

The only portable way to do this is, is to call the code via eval, and wrap that in a guard. Eg: (define (safe-eval code env) (guard [e [(syntax-violation? e) (display e)]] (eval code env))) Usage: > (safe-eval '(let a v) (environment '(rnrs))) &who: let &message: "invalid syntax" &syntax: form: (let a v) subform: #f


3

As per my comment, this will probably be quite difficult. Another aspect is that Simply Scheme sees symbols as 'strings'. With that info you could write the following: (define (first s) (string->symbol (string (car (string->list (symbol->string s)))))) (define (butfirst s) (string->symbol (apply string (cdr (string->list ...


3

Rather than using import, a better solution is to keep track of the original function by let-binding it. It's also better to check that the type of the argument is a string, rather than that it is not a number. Using both of these approaches means that it's possible to compose the technique. (define + (let ((old+ +)) (lambda args (if (string? ...


2

Honestly, while each one has their own quirks and modifications to the standard, they're mostly the same. The biggest differences is how it compiles. You should probably just pick one and go with it. Racket would be a good choice because it comes with a nice debugging IDE and is easy to set up.


2

lambda! (define (foo getx setx) (setx (+ (getx) 5))) (define y 2) (display y)(newline) (foo (lambda () y) (lambda (val) (set! y val))) (display y)(newline)


2

Jari is right it is somewhat unscheme-like to pass by reference, at least with variables. However the behavior you want is used, and often encouraged, all the time in a more scheme like way by using closures. Pages 181 and 182(google books) in the seasoned scheme do a better job then I can of explaining it. Here is a reference that gives a macro that allows ...


2

R6RS lends itself more towards achieving your goal by identifying the library that you want to customize, excluding the parts you want to customize, and then defining those parts in your own library. Here is an example: myrnrs.sls (library (myrnrs) (export set!) (import (except (rnrs) set!) (rename (rnrs) (set! rnrs-set!))) (define set! "Hello, ...



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