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7

Racket has the concept of main submodules. You can read about them in the Racket Guide section entitled Main and Test Submodules. They do precisely what you want—when a file is run directly using racket or DrRacket, the main submodule is executed. If a file is used by another file using require, the main submodule is not run. The Racket equivalent of your ...


6

I like Alexis' macro! It has more of the "lens" flavor you wanted. I also want to point out struct-copy. Given: #lang racket (struct my-struct (f1 f2 f3 f4) #:transparent) (define s (my-struct 1 2 3 4)) You can use struct-copy to set a value: (struct-copy my-struct s [f2 200]) ;;=> (my-struct 1 200 3 4) Or to update a value: (struct-copy my-struct ...


6

You know what? This is a really good idea. In fact, there have been a few cases in which I wanted this functionality, but I didn't have it. The bad news is that nothing of this sort is provided by Racket. The good news is that Racket has macros! I present to you define-struct-updaters! (require (for-syntax racket/list ...


5

You're actually doing this correctly, albeit with a tiny mistake: (lambda x (curry modulo x)) This doesn't do what you think it does. What you actually want is this: (lambda (x) (curry modulo x)) See the difference? In the former, x is not within an arguments list, so it will actually be passed a list of all arguments passed to the function, not a ...


5

Use append for this: (append '(1 2 3 4) '(15 16)) => '(1 2 3 4 15 16)


4

Try this: (map list '(1 2 3 4))


4

It's a safe bet that this: (call-a-function arg) Is returning a function, not a list as you assumed. That's why you're getting a #procedure printed on-screen. Check your function, make sure it returns the appropriate value.


4

The random function works fine, but your code is wrong. You want this instead: (define random-abcd (let ([n (random 4)]) (cond [(equal? n 0) 'A] [(equal? n 1) 'B] [(equal? n 2) 'C] [else 'D]))) In your original example, you generated a new random number for every comparison. This seems like it shouldn't affect the ...


4

When you start with n being 2, you then call (repeated f (- 1 2)). (- 1 2) is -1, which is not equal to 1, so it continues with (repeated f (- 1 -1)). (- 1 -1) is 2, so you call (repeated f 2) again and you have reached an infinite loop. When using the other order you start with (- 2 1), which is 1, so that's where the recursion stops. In other words: if ...


4

These features are provided as part of DrRacket's background expansion, which can be enabled or disabled in the "Background Expansion" tab of DrRacket's preferences. Enabling background expansion causes DrRacket to constantly perform macro-expansion as you edit your program, which will automatically detect syntax errors as a helpful side-effect. Once ...


4

if and cond are not "lazy", they just have different evaluation rules. For example, in the following expression only the consequent part of the if is executed, because the condition happens to be true: (if (= 1 1) 'ok (/ 1 0)) => 'ok If the alternative part were executed, we'd have a division by zero error. This is not lazy evaluation, it's ...


3

You can use require-library to load things from the standard library: http://download.plt-scheme.org/doc/103p1/html/mzscheme/node157.htm (require-library "spidey.ss") You can also use the support facilities (load and friends) to load single files. You need to use absolute paths though or else its going to search relative to your current working ...


3

You can use the argmax function to do this conveniently. You can use map with cons to "zip" the two lists into a series of pairs, then pass the result into argmax to find the pair you want. (define num-list '(4 8 2 7)) (define sym-list '(a b c d)) (cdr (argmax car (map cons num-list sym-list))) ; => 'b The way argmax works is that it takes an ...


3

Or, if you're merging two sorted lists and need to maintain the ordering in the result list: (require srfi/1) (define (merge-sorted-lists lhs rhs #:order (lt? <)) (let loop ((result '()) (lhs lhs) (rhs rhs)) (cond ((null? lhs) (append-reverse result rhs)) ((null? rhs) (append-reverse result lhs)) ((lt? ...


3

For something like this, it's probably more idiomatic in Racket to just use define. You can declare a function within your existing function, then use it as normal. (define/public (get-rects) (define (wrap-edge coords) (append coords tetramino-wh)) (case current-type [(0) (vector (wrap-edge (list 0 0)) (wrap-edge (list ...


3

Here's the correct way to call the recursion: (define (sumof a b q r) (define (sum q) (+ (* (expt q 2) a) b)) (if (= q r) 0 (+ (sum q) (sumof a b (+ q 1) r)))) You should pass along the parameter that changes at each iteration, that's cleaner than capturing it from the defining environment. And notice how the sumof function must ...


3

Since this is a homework question, I'll show you the techinque using a different example. The following grammar has two non-terminals S and T. For each non-terminal I have defined a function that generates a random string according to the rules. Since S has four rules, I pick one of the rules at random. #lang racket ;;; Grammar ; The grammar has two ...


3

Check your else clause: [else (string? (first lst)) (string? (rest lst))] 1) You have two predicate calls that both return some boolean value, but you aren't connecting them in any way. You want to know if all elements in the list are strings, so what boolean operator (and, or, etc.) would fit best here? 2) (string? (rest lst)) is going to return ...


3

The big-bang form works by passing a "state" throughout handlers, which is then handed off to the to-draw handler to paint the picture that will be flushed to the screen. For starters, you should lift your drawing code into big-bang's to-draw clause: (big-bang null (to-draw (λ (state) (text "---Small Shack---" 18 "brown") (define door ...


3

Bear in mind that (cdr (cdr ...)) is returning a list (not an element!), so pair? will return true if the list has enough elements (three or more). Perhaps you were aiming for something like this? (define (multiplicand p) (if (null? (cdddr p)) ; assuming list has at least 3 elements p `(* ,(second p) (* ,(third p) ,(fourth p))))) ...


2

Racket structs can inherit from another struct. So: #lang racket (struct shape ()) (struct square shape (nw length)) (struct circle shape (center radius)) (struct rectangle shape (nw width height)) (define (area-of-shape shape) (if (shape? shape) (cond [(square? shape) (* (square-length shape) (square-length shape))] [(circle? shape) ...


2

The list must be mutable if you want set-mcdr! to work, and all procedures used must also operate on mutable pairs; please check the documentation and notice that all the procedures contain an m as part of their name. For example, try this: (require racket/mpair) (define x (mlist 1 2)) (set-mcdr! (mcdr x) x)


2

You don't want plain read for something like this. It is built to read Scheme/Racket syntax, not arbitrary data. Instead, you probably want string->list, which splits a string into a list of characters. (string->list "(expression here)") ; => '(#\( #\e #\x #\p #\r #\e #\s #\s #\i #\o #\n #\space #\h #\e #\r #\e #\)) Perhaps you don't want to read ...


2

It's not surprising that it is difficult to write code. Though recursion is useful, this is about the worst way to introduce it because using recursion for this problem goes against any inclination toward sound software engineering practice. Mathematic Specification Looking at the basic equation: It's clear that the problem isn't fully specified. Is it ...


2

From you text I see that you do '(element). Problem with that is that everything which is quoted is never anything but what you see. Thus if element happen to be a variable it won't be expanded because of the quote. The right way to get a list with one element would be to use list. eg. (list element) to get whatever the variable element to be the one ...


2

The most direct equality comparison procedure to use between characters would be char=?: (define somevar #\space) (char=? somevar #\space) => #t Of course, you can always use equal?, but if equal? isn't working, then it's possible that the problem is elsewhere. Check the variables being used in the comparison, there's a good chance that they have a ...


2

The funtion equal? should work. > (define a #\space) > (define b #\space) > (equal? a b) #t The problem must be something else. How do you give somevar a value?


2

Your approach is the correct one. You simply missed a small detail. PDF and postscript files often are meant to be printed. Printed documents need a margin (the printer needs grab the edge of the paper). The settings in (current-ps-setup) is used for the paper size, margin size and the scaling. Setting the scaling to 1 and the margin size to 0 will give you ...


2

Yes, this is a bug. It turns out that splicing-syntax-parameterize has a somewhat strange expansion that doesn't play nicely with the way Typed Racket detects and installs type annotations. I have written a fix for this bug, which you can find here. As expected, your original program now fails to typecheck. This fix should be available in Racket 6.1.1.8 or ...


2

You're very close, and you're on the right track thinking about list*. In fact, replacing list with list* in your attempt yields this program, which is almost exactly correct: (define (likenate lst) (cond [(empty? lst) '()] [else (list* (first lst) 'like (likenate (rest lst)))])) You can think of list* as a shorthand for multiple conses. To put ...



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