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5

The built-in racket/stream library uses lazy evaluation and memoization to draw elements from a stream: (define (print-and-return x) (displayln "drawing element...") x) (define (in-range-stream n m) (if (= n m) empty-stream (stream-cons (print-and-return n) (in-range-stream (add1 n) m)))) (define s (in-range-stream 5 10)) (stream-first ...


5

(and expression1 expression2 ...) Excessive parentheses are understood as if your expressions are to be applied like a procedure. eg. (and ((if some-var + -) 4 6)) The result here is either -2 or 10 depending on the value of some-var. The and is redundant as (and x) is the same as x. As for your code, here is how it should be: (define (time-calendar ...


5

Just nest the function calls. An easy way would be: (define (square x) (* x x)) (square (sin x)) Or create a composed function: (define square-sin (compose square sin)) (square-sin x)


5

According to this part of the Racket Guide: (define-syntax-rule (abbrev short long) (define-syntax-rule (short body (... ...)) (long body (... ...)))) Quoting the above link: The only non-obvious part of its definition is the (... ...), which “quotes” ... so that it takes its usual role in the generated macro, instead of the generating ...


4

The standard if (if test-expr then-expr else-expr) will only evaluate either then-expr or else-expr, depending on test-expr, because this if is either a special form or a syntactic extension based on a special form, which means it doesn't follow the normal evaluation rules. bad-if, on the other hand, is a standard procedure. In that case, Scheme first ...


4

The problem reported occurs because you're using eq? to test for string equality. From the documentation: (eq? v1 v2) → boolean? : Return #t if v1 and v2 refer to the same object, #f otherwise. So you see, eq? is testing for identity, not for equality. For that, you should use string=? or equal?. Modify the contains? procedure as follows, and it'll ...


4

Add (require parser-tools/lex) The lex-sre just provides an alternative notation for regular expressions.


4

Use list*: (let ([someval (some-func ...)] [someval2 [some-func2 ...)] [args (my-func ...)]) (fun (list* someval someval2 args))) list* takes it's arguments and builds them into a list like list does, with the exception that if the last argument is a list, it uses that as the tail of the list, e.g. (list* 1 2 '(3 4 5)) is '(1 2 3 4 5). So ...


4

ad 1. Yes. ad 2. Your example can most easily be written #lang racket (define-syntax (abbrev stx) (syntax-case stx () [(_ short new) #'(define-syntax short (make-rename-transformer #'new))])) (abbrev def define) (def x 42) x The example above evaluates to 42.


4

Try this: (define find-allocations (lambda (n l) (if (null? l) '() (cons (if (<= (get-property (car l) 'capacity) n) (cons (car l) (find-allocations (- n (get-property (car l) 'capacity)) (cdr l))) '()) (if (<= (get-property (car l) 'capacity) n) (cons (car l) ...


3

The log function in scheme yields the natural logarithm (base e) of a number. In order to compute the logarithm of a different base, you simply divide the loge of a number by the loge of the desired base. To define a log5 function in Scheme: (define (log5 x) (/ (log x) (log 5))) Then (log5 25) will yield 2.0


3

Apart from the syntax problems pointed by @Rptx, there's one killer bug in your code: you can't have one-armed ifs in Racket (meaning: they must have a consequent and an alternative). You can either nest them, or better yet: use cond, which is perfect for testing multiple conditions. This should work: (define (check) (let ((runner (randint -5 10))) ...


3

Use the stepper! To be more specific: Snip the #lang racket off the top of your program Change the language level to "Intermediate Student" Click on the Step button. Watch carefully to see where things go off the rails.


2

It really hurts my eyes to see 3 expressions in a implicit begin with each their own if without alternative. Here is a version using cond (only because it's 2 terms and an alternative) Also notice that it's enough with one < with the bounds on each side of your variable rather than splitting it up in two with a logical and between. (define (check) (let ...


2

When you call (symbol->string (read)) and enter in a, you get a fresh string "a". This is a new string object that is not eq? to any "a" in your program. Try this to see the problem: (eq? (symbol->string (read)) "a") If you enter in a, this will output #f because the two string items are separate objects. You've run afoul of string interning. All ...


2

You can do that using a syntactic extension: (define-syntax-rule (update-foo somefoo param) (struct-copy foo somefoo [param 4])) testing: > tst (foo 1 2 3) > (update-foo tst b) (foo 1 4 3) The macro stepper in Racket shows the following transformation: from (module anonymous-module racket (#%module-begin (struct foo (a b c) ...


2

stream-cons is a special form. It equalent to wrapping both arguments in lambdas, making them thunks. like this: (stream-cons n (all-ints (+ 1 n))) ; ==> (cons (lambda () n) (lambda () (all-ints (+ n 1)))) These procedures are made with the lexical scopes so here n is the initial value while when forcing the tail would call all-ints again in a new ...


2

Based on the first example of the doc, and given that the function you want to plot already exists in Racket, it's as simple as: (require plot) (plot (function sqr 0 5 #:label "y = x ^ 2")) If you just want to see the individual points, this is also taken from the docs: (require plot) (define xs '(0 1 2 3 4 5)) (define ys '(0 1 4 9 16 25)) (plot ...


2

What about structs (Racket) or record-types (R6RS)? In Racket: #lang racket (struct cell (x y)) (define (ccons x y) (cell x y)) (define (ccar cl) (cell-x cl)) (define (ccdr cl) (cell-y cl)) (define (cpair? cl) (cell? cl)) (define x (ccons 1 2)) (cpair? x) => #t (ccar (ccons 1 2)) => 1 (ccdr (ccons 3 4)) => 4


2

You can use the memoize package. GitHub source: https://github.com/jbclements/memoize/tree/master raco pkg install memoize Using it is as simple as replacing define with define/memo. To quote its example: (define (fib n) (if (<= n 1) 1 (+ (fib (- n 1)) (fib (- n 2))))) > (time (fib 35)) ...


2

(This was originally a comment, but OP asked me to post it as an answer) If you want to have arbitrary runtime field names, then it sounds like you're duck-typing a dictionary not a struct... in which case you should use a dictionary. One characteristic of a Racket struct is that referencing a field can be faster precisely because it's a static offset ...


2

We can examine the contents of an infinite stream by implementing a procedure that consumes a given number of elements and returns them in a list, for example: (define (print strm n) (if (zero? n) '() (cons (car strm) (print ((cdr strm)) (sub1 n))))) If we apply it to your stream, here's what we obtain: (print (mystery 1 2 3) 5) ...


2

Simplest: (define (display-all . vs) (for-each display vs)) Note the use of for-each instead of map - for-each is the same thing but assumes you're only calling the function for side-effects, so instead of returning a list of results (using map with display would return a list of voids) it just returns void. This can get annoying if you want to display ...


1

For other Scheme implementations that use SRFI 41 streams, those streams also fully memoise all the materialised elements. In fact, in my Guile port of SRFI 41 (which has been in Guile since 2.0.9), the default printer for streams will print out all the elements so materialised (and nothing that isn't): scheme@(guile-user)> ,use (srfi srfi-41) ...


1

Nice to see you have solved your own problem. However I feel I should pick a little since reversing a list is realy building one on your way iterating. (define (reverse-list lon) ;; iterative helper procedure (define (aux lon acc) (if (empty? lon) acc (aux (rest lon) (cons (first lon) acc)))) ;; use helper (aux ...


1

This is a good way of doing it. #lang racket (define (my-cons x y) (lambda (p) (if (= p 1) x y))) (define (my-car pair) (pair 1)) (define (my-cdr pair) (pair 2)) Here is the test > (my-car (my-cons 1 '(2 3 4))) 1 > (my-cdr (my-cons 1 '(2 3 4))) '(2 3 4)


1

A cons has two cells. car and cdr. A cell can be displayed as (a . b) where a and b can be anything. There is an alternative representation to a pair. If b is either another pair or the empty list you can just replace . b ) with b without the initial (. Thus: (a . ()) ; ==> (a) (a . (b . c)) ; ==> (a b . c) (a . (b . (c . ()))) ; ...


1

Tail recursive approach using a named let: (define (reverse lst) (let loop ([lst lst] [lst-reversed '()]) (if (empty? lst) lst-reversed (loop (rest lst) (cons (first lst) lst-reversed))))) This is basically the same approach as having a helper function with an accumulator argument as in Oscar's answer, where the loop binding after ...


1

There's no need to sort the values, we can extract the minimum and then find the corresponding key. Here's an idiomatic way in Racket to retrieve the key corresponding to the minimum value in the hash table: (define (key-min-value ht) (car ; extract the key of the minimum entry (argmin ; find the minimum in the entry list ...


1

Assuming you've got a list of animals and a function weight that takes one animal and gives you its weight, you mgiht be better off using apply and map here instead of doing the recursion yourself: (define (zoo-weight animals) (apply + (map weight animals))) map takes a function and a list and calls the function once for each thing in the list, e.g. ...



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