Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Your sum function will loop forever because (square 1) always evaluates to 1 and will never be greater than 5.


5

It's a list of symbols (not strings). It's the same as this: (list 'ace 'spade 'king 'queen) For more details please check the documentation. Notice that a list of strings would look like this: '("ace" "spade" "king" "queen") Or equivalently: (list "ace" "spade" "king" "queen")


4

Your attempt was on the right track, but you have to pass an adequate argument for #:key - we want to evaluate each function with the given value, and thesort procedure will sort the input list of functions according to the result returned by each function, when applied to the value. Try this: (define (function-sort functions value) (sort functions < ...


4

In the general case, what you want is impossible due to how types are implemented in Racket. Racket has contracts, which are run-time wrappers that guard parts of a program from other parts. A function contract is a wrapper that treats the function as a black box - a contract of the form (-> number? number?) can wrap any function and the new wrapper ...


4

There are functional data structures that are designed to reduce the cost of copying - for example, if a function mutates a branch of a tree, then the new tree would share the nodes from the unaffected branches and only the mutated branch would need to be copied. Chris Okasaki's Purely Functional Data Structures is the best paper on this that I am aware of, ...


4

The correct solution is to use cond's => form: (cond ((regexp-match #rx"start" "startofstring") => (lambda (match) (set! lst (cons match lst)))) ...) (Note that I renamed your list variable to lst to avoid shadowing the built-in list procedure.) If you have many patterns, and the same action for multiple patterns, you ...


4

Because of this code: (vector (vector-set! (level-entities current) 0 (random-posn 1)) (vector-set! (level-entities current) 1 (random-posn 1)) (vector-set! (level-entities current) 2 (random-posn 1)) ...


4

It isn't, really: (define (convert-base from to n) (let f ([n n] [mul 1] [res 0]) (if (zero? n) res (f (quotient n to) (* mul from) (+ res (* mul (modulo n to))))))) Testing > (convert-base-y 10 2 10) 1010 > (convert-base-y 10 8 64) 100


3

Yes, you do have to escape the parenthesis, but regexp literals in Racket simply use ordinary string parsing, so you also have to escape the backslash. (regexp-match #rx"\\(" "(") ; => '("(")


3

Try this: (append '(1 2 3) '(23)) => '(1 2 3 23) That's fine for appending a single element. If you're planning to repeatedly add many elements at the end, it's better if you cons everything at the head and then reverse the list when you're done. Why? because using append for building an output list will quickly degenerate into an O(n^2) solution (see: ...


3

Here's a method that totally uses higher-order functions (foldr, append-map, and map; now also with compose1, curry, and curryr): (define (cartesian-product . lists) (foldr (lambda (a b) (append-map (compose1 (curryr map b) (curry cons)) a)) '(()) lists)) Pardon the terrible parameter names. One day ...


3

> (require unstable/list) > (cartesian-product '(1 2 3) '(a b c)) '((1 a) (1 b) (1 c) (2 a) (2 b) (2 c) (3 a) (3 b) (3 c)) See http://docs.racket-lang.org/unstable/list.html#%28def._%28%28lib._unstable%2Flist..rkt%29._cartesian-product%29%29


3

Short answer: the first version of reverse is incorrectly building an improper list, the second version is inefficiently building a proper list. We can do better as long as we understand the difference between append and cons. append concatenates two lists. If we use it for just adding an element at the end of one list, we'll be doing a lot more of work ...


3

Try this: (define (ggT m n) (cond [(> m n) (ggT (- m n) n)] [(< m n) (ggT m (- n m))] [else m])) You just have to pass the parameters in the correct order when calling the ggT function, remember that ggT receives two parameters, but you were passing only one.


2

Your function ggT takes two parameters, but you are only passing 1 in. I think you want something like this: (define (ggT m n) (cond [(> m n)(ggT (- m n) n)] [(< m n)(ggT m (- n m))] [else m]))


2

GNU MIT Scheme GNU MIT Scheme implements two sort algorithms: merge-sort quick-sort Properly implemented each will run in O(n log n) time. This is the optimum time for any comparison sort algorithm. The sort procedure is an alias for merge-sort. Likewise, its mutable counterpart sort! is an alias for the mutable merge-sort!. So why have quick-sort at ...


2

In this case, it means the same as (cond (result (second result)) (else ...)) In general, a cond clause of (foo => bar) means that if foo evaluates to a truthy value, then its value is saved, and passed as an argument to bar (which should evaluate to a procedure that takes one argument).


2

That means: if the condition evaluates to a truthy value, send that value to the function to the right. It's in the documentation. For example: (define alst '((x 1) (y 2) (z 3))) ; if the list contains an association with the `y` key, return the second element ; of that association, which happens to be the value `2` (cond ((assoc 'y alst) => second) ...


2

The clause [result => second] is handled like this by cond: The expression result is evaluated and the result is stored in a temporary variable, say, t. If the value was non-false, then the expression second is evaluated and the result is stored in, say, f. If the the value f is a function, then (f t) is evaluated and its result becomes the result of ...


2

The trick here is to declare a local variable before actually defining the function, in this way the state will be inside a closure and we can update it as we see fit. We can implement a solution using list-ref and saving the current index, but it's not recommended. It'd be better to store the list and cdr over it until its end is reached, this is what I ...


2

Sure. Here's an adapted version of your code: (define (split ls) (if (or (null? ls) (null? (cdr ls))) (list ls '()) (let ((next (split (cddr ls)))) (list (cons (car ls) (car next)) (cons (cadr ls) (cadr next))))))


2

leppie's answer is basically a complete answer. Short answer: it depends on the implementation, but R6RS requires this sort to be stable, and it's therefore likely to be mergesort. What Scheme are you using?


2

Since I am self answering, I'm taking the liberty to clarify the gist of my question in light of the discussion of arity as a solution. The difference in arity was due to my not considering its implications when specifying the question. The Problem In #lang typed/racket as in many Lisps, functions, or more properly: procedures, are first class dataypes. ...


2

You need to use double escapes here. (regexp-match #rx"\\(" "(")


2

There are a couple of clean ways to do this. First of all, you could use match here. (match "startofstring" [(regexp #rx"start" match) (cons match list)] [(regexp #rx"blah" match) (cons match list)] ... [_ (printf "No matching regex.\n")]) Of course, even that has a lot of repetition. You could do this a little differently with a small helper ...


2

Figured it out. The rules are going to apply in every node as promised. You can vote to delete the question. But, I would add some explanation on how I made it working. I changed some code. The original code seems written with some other semantic in mind. I added some commentary where I made some decision on my own. #lang racket ;matcher (define (match pat ...


1

For this, you need to traverse the tree using a pre-order traversal, taking care of correctly creating an output list as you go. Following the standard template for a tree traversal is easy, you just need to know where to call the recursion and where to put the current element. I'll give you some hints, and won't spoil the fun of reaching your own answer. ...


1

Usually it's more convenient to deal with HTML as x-expressions instead of the html module's structs. Also you should probably use call/input-url to handle closing the port automatically. You can combine both of these ideas by defining a read-html-as-xexpr function and using it like this: #lang racket/base (require html net/url xml) ...


1

Ultimately I found that the answer was to use Racket's sequence, streams, and generator libraries for this kind of thing. The generators are especially nice, allowing a simple Python-like "yield" function. These features allow lazy sequences without full-on lazy evaluation as provided by #lang lazy. http://docs.racket-lang.org/reference/streams.html


1

I was composing this answer off-line, and came back to find you'd mostly answered it already. I'll post anyway in case the details are helpful to anyone. If you really need #lang lazy, and want to use string-split, I think you can simply (require racket/string) to use it? I'm not sure I understand exactly what you mean by "lazy", here. Using in-lines ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible