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8

Here is a sample interaction that shows them behaving differently: Welcome to Racket v6.2.900.10. -> (define ns (make-base-namespace)) ; set up namespace ns -> (eval '(require racket/vector) ns) ; bring in vector-map into ns -> (module a racket/base (define stx #'(vector-map + #(1 2) #(3 4))) ; no vector-map here (provide stx)) -> ...


6

You can use the ~a function with the #:max-width and #:limit-marker keywords to truncate strings. For example: (~a "foobar" #:max-width 4 #:limit-marker "...") evaluates to "f...". On the other hand: (~a "foo" #:max-width 4 #:limit-marker "...") evaluates to "foo". You can find the documentation for this function here.


6

A similar question came up recently on the Racket mailing list, and, someone posted a link to an older thread where Matthew Flatt suggested starting a subprocess and piping. It looks like Julia doesn't provide a foreign interface (e.g., to call Julia from C). So, I think that you'll have to run Julia in a separate process via process or subprocess ...


6

To extend the other answers and give some more examples for the second part of the question: #lang racket (struct A (x y)) (displayln (A 1 2)) ; => #<A> (equal? (A 1 2) (A 1 2)) ; => #f ;(equal? (A 1 2) (read (open-input-string (~a (A 1 2))))) ; => ERR: bad syntax (struct B (x y) #:transparent) (displayln (B 3 4)) ; => #(struct:B 3 4) ...


6

To make a structure type transparent, use the #:transparent keyword after the field-name sequence: (struct posn (x y) #:transparent) > (posn 1 2) (posn 1 2) An instance of a transparent structure type prints like a call to the constructor, so that it shows the structures field values. A transparent structure type also allows reflective ...


6

A very useful tool to debug programs is the Program Stepper. The stepper will show you how the program is evaluated one step at a time. The stepper only works for programs written in the teaching languages, so I have changed your program a little (I haven't changed the logic). In DrRacket open a new file. Paste the program below (including the examples at ...


6

Direct the output to the output port and everything works: #lang racket (struct vector (x y z) #:methods gen:custom-write [(define (write-proc vector port mode) (let ([print (if mode write display)]) (write-string "<" port) (print (vector-x vector) port) (write-string ", " port) (print (vector-y vector) port) ...


5

The racket guide probably has a more gentle introduction to prefab structs. The biggest difference is that a transparent struct still requires the struct constructor to create one of them. For example, given the following struct definition: (struct foo (a b) #:prefab) The following are two ways to create the exact same struct. > (foo 1 2) '#s(foo 1 ...


5

The final expression, the division itself, needs to go inside the let*. This is because let forms introduce bindings that are only lexically scoped to their bodies. Furthermore, let forms require a body, which is why you're getting that error (in your example, they have no body at all because the final expression is outside them). To fix this, just move the ...


5

When you make a procedure the arguments are already evaluated when you start the body of the procedure. Thus delay would not do anything since it's already computed at that time. cons-stream need to be a macro. DrRacket is not one language implementation. It's an IDE that supports lots of languages. One of them is a SICP compatibility language. I mananged ...


5

Try this, in the point where you're printing an element of the random list: (display (car x) out) In other words: instead of printing x, print the first element of x and it should look fine.


5

The natural recursion has to do with the "natural", recursive definition of the type you are dealing with. Here, you are working with natural numbers; since "obviously" a natural number is either zero or the successor of another natural number, when you want to build a natural number, you naturally output 0 or (add1 z) for some other natural z which happens ...


5

You need to use the port supplied to write-proc: (struct vector (x y z) #:methods gen:custom-write [(define (write-proc vector port mode) (let ([print (if mode write display)]) (write-string "<" port) (print (vector-x vector) port) (write-string ", " port) (print (vector-y vector) port) (write-string ", " port) ...


4

Your program will display "Hello World!" only once, since in the recursive call you do not print anything. Only the final result of the call is returned, and this consists of the string "Hello World!". On the other hand, the only way to display n times a string, without printing it, is to produce the result by concatenating the string n times. For instance: ...


4

In Scheme, most of the time you'll probably want to use the default "current" ports for input and output. On most Unix systems, the default current input port is linked to stdin and the default current output port is linked to stdout. With that in mind, reading in two numbers and writing out their product is basically: (display (* (read) (read))) Now, if ...


4

Let's take a look at the actual foldl from Racket: (define foldl (case-lambda [(f init l) (check-fold 'foldl f init l null) (let loop ([init init] [l l]) (if (null? l) init (loop (f (car l) init) (cdr l))))] [(f init l . ls) (check-fold 'foldl f init l ls) (let loop ([init init] [ls (cons l ls)]) ...


4

You can put the syntax location directly on the check-equal? expression to get the behavior that you want. Here's an example: (define-syntax (my-test=? stx) (syntax-case stx () [(_ case1 case2) (quasisyntax (test-case "tests" #,(syntax/loc stx (check-equal? case1 case2))))])) Putting the syntax location on the outer expression ...


4

Scheme uses lexical scoping, so of course that code always returns lexical. However, in a Lisp system that uses dynamic scoping, scope would indeed be dynamic inside that (let ((scope 'dynamic)) ...) expression…. In order to understand that, you have to understand how dynamic scoping is implemented. Think of each variable as having a stack of values.† So, ...


4

The value of test is not (let ((scope 'lexical)) (lambda () scope)) it is just (lambda () scope) When you call it, (test), the function body is evaluated, and it consists only of scope With lexical scope, this would be the value in the binding that was in effect when the definition was evaluated, i.e the lexically enclosing let-binding. With ...


3

Insert a space between . and b. The problems is that .b is a legal name in Racket, so .b is in scope not b.


3

The result depends on the definition of square, that you have probably defined in a wrong way. Here is the right definition of square that returns the correct answer: (define (square item) (* item item)) (define (square-list items) (define (iter things answer) (if (null? things) answer (iter (cdr things) (cons (square (car things)) ...


3

It should mean "a list consisting of the atom list, the atom 1, and the atom 2". Until Scheme evaluates the list (which the single quote prevents), it doesn't treat "list" differently from any other string.


3

You can combine dynamic-enter! and quote-module-path to do this. Given a repl interaction for the code above that you posted: > (require racket/enter syntax/location) > (dynamic-enter! (quote-module-path sub)) > bar #<procedure:bar> Alternatively, you could use dynamic-require/expose (the expose part allows you require things that are not ...


3

Changing the indentation a little: (define (for-each proc items) (cond [(not (null? items)) (proc (car items)) (for-each proc (cdr items))])) A call (for-each f (list 1 2 3)) will call the function and bind proc to f and items to '(1 2 3). The test (not (null? items)) is true, since '(1 2 3) is non-empty. The right hand ...


3

Here's the dual to the program at the bottom of Asumu's answer: #lang racket/base (require racket/vector) ; adds vector-map to lexical scope ; use vector-map from lexical scope (eval-syntax #'(vector-map + #(1 2) #(3 4))) ; => #(4 6) ; vector-map not in dynamic scope ; (make-base-namespace == racket/base) (eval '(vector-map + #(1 2) #(3 4)) ...


3

@soegaard explained it perfectly. You can't do what you want directly without modifying the macro expander. To extend @soegaard's answer, here is a way to simulate what you are asking for. It essentially does a "double-dispatch" macro expansion. As soegaard noted though, there's probably a more idiomatic way to achieve what you want, depending on your ...


3

It seems to me that you need to find an alternative strategy. Maybe we can find a solution if you provide more details of the situation you want to use this in. Anyways, here is why your strategy don't work. When you write (define-syntax proxy ...) you associate a syntax-transformer with the identifier proxy. That transformer is called by the expander ...


3

"Natural" (or just "Structural") recursion is the best way to start teaching students about recursion. This is because it has the wonderful guarantee that Joshua Taylor points out: it's guaranteed to terminate[*]. Students have a hard enough time wrapping their heads around this kind of program that making this a "rule" can save them a huge amount of ...


3

Have you used raco link in the past? You can sometimes see this error message if you have raco linked a directory that you have since deleted. There are three things you can try: Run raco link --repair. This should ideally repair your installation by removing all dead links. Run raco link -r pkfds, this should remove your pfds link. Check your links.rktd ...


3

Your function actually calculates the correct result for all the numbers from 1 to 21, simply you do not do anything to display them in the output, or collect them is some way, so that they are “lost” after being calculated inside fizzbuzz1 (the initial print only print the result of fizzbuzz1, which is #<void>). If you want to display them (by using ...



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