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7

Racket is very close to plain Scheme for most purposes, and for this example, they're the same. But the real difference between the two versions is the need for a delaying wrapper which is needed in a strict language (Scheme and Racket), but not in a lazy one (Lazy Racket, a different language). That wrapper is put around the (x x) or (g g) -- what we know ...


5

(and expression1 expression2 ...) Excessive parentheses are understood as if your expressions are to be applied like a procedure. eg. (and ((if some-var + -) 4 6)) The result here is either -2 or 10 depending on the value of some-var. The and is redundant as (and x) is the same as x. As for your code, here is how it should be: (define (time-calendar ...


4

The problem reported occurs because you're using eq? to test for string equality. From the documentation: (eq? v1 v2) → boolean? : Return #t if v1 and v2 refer to the same object, #f otherwise. So you see, eq? is testing for identity, not for equality. For that, you should use string=? or equal?. Modify the contains? procedure as follows, and it'll ...


4

Add (require parser-tools/lex) The lex-sre just provides an alternative notation for regular expressions.


4

Use list*: (let ([someval (some-func ...)] [someval2 [some-func2 ...)] [args (my-func ...)]) (fun (list* someval someval2 args))) list* takes it's arguments and builds them into a list like list does, with the exception that if the last argument is a list, it uses that as the tail of the list, e.g. (list* 1 2 '(3 4 5)) is '(1 2 3 4 5). So ...


3

In recent versions of Racket, you can use classes and racket/draw in Typed Racket. For example: Welcome to Racket v6.0.1.13. -> (require typed/racket/draw) -> (make-bitmap 300 300) - : (Instance Bitmap%) (object:bitmap% ...) but it's indeed still experimental so you may hit some bugs or limitations. In particular, for now you won't be able to pass ...


3

The log function in scheme yields the natural logarithm (base e) of a number. In order to compute the logarithm of a different base, you simply divide the loge of a number by the loge of the desired base. To define a log5 function in Scheme: (define (log5 x) (/ (log x) (log 5))) Then (log5 25) will yield 2.0


3

To get a behavior closer to C's printf() function use the format procedure provided by SRFI-48, like this: (require srfi/48) (format "The area of the disk is ~6,2F~%" (- d1 d2)) A more verbose alternative would be to use Racket's built-in ~r procedure, as suggested by @stchang: (string-append "The area of the disk is " (~r (- d1 d2) #:min-width 6 ...


3

Apart from the syntax problems pointed by @Rptx, there's one killer bug in your code: you can't have one-armed ifs in Racket (meaning: they must have a consequent and an alternative). You can either nest them, or better yet: use cond, which is perfect for testing multiple conditions. This should work: (define (check) (let ((runner (randint -5 10))) ...


3

Based on your previous question, you're going about it in a totally imperative way (and incorrect, of course, otherwise you wouldn't be asking this question), which is not how Scheme likes to work. Here's a functional (but not iterative) way to write the function: (define (f n) (if (< n 4) n (+ (f (- n 1)) (* 2 (f (- n 2))) (* 3 (f (- n ...


2

The error reported occurs because there are a couple of unnecessary () surrounding the expressions inside the d helper procedure. You don't have to do that, all the expressions inside a procedure are implicitly inside a begin, there's no need to use () to indicate that they're all part of a block of code - and besides, when we surround an expression with () ...


2

Racket has ~r. You'll probably want to provide #:min-width and #:precision arguments.


2

Based on the comment on this previous answer: If a module doesn't mutate a binding you cannot mutate it from outside the module. Running code in the REPL is not the same as running code in the module. A racket source in Racket language is a module and #lang scheme is not Scheme but synonym for #lang racket. So to get the behaviour you would like you can ...


2

It really hurts my eyes to see 3 expressions in a implicit begin with each their own if without alternative. Here is a version using cond (only because it's 2 terms and an alternative) Also notice that it's enough with one < with the bounds on each side of your variable rather than splitting it up in two with a logical and between. (define (check) (let ...


2

When you call (symbol->string (read)) and enter in a, you get a fresh string "a". This is a new string object that is not eq? to any "a" in your program. Try this to see the problem: (eq? (symbol->string (read)) "a") If you enter in a, this will output #f because the two string items are separate objects. You've run afoul of string interning. All ...


2

stream-cons is a special form. It equalent to wrapping both arguments in lambdas, making them thunks. like this: (stream-cons n (all-ints (+ 1 n))) ; ==> (cons (lambda () n) (lambda () (all-ints (+ n 1)))) These procedures are made with the lexical scopes so here n is the initial value while when forcing the tail would call all-ints again in a new ...


2

Based on the first example of the doc, and given that the function you want to plot already exists in Racket, it's as simple as: (require plot) (plot (function sqr 0 5 #:label "y = x ^ 2")) If you just want to see the individual points, this is also taken from the docs: (require plot) (define xs '(0 1 2 3 4 5)) (define ys '(0 1 4 9 16 25)) (plot ...


2

You can do that using a syntactic extension: (define-syntax-rule (update-foo somefoo param) (struct-copy foo somefoo [param 4])) testing: > tst (foo 1 2 3) > (update-foo tst b) (foo 1 4 3) The macro stepper in Racket shows the following transformation: from (module anonymous-module racket (#%module-begin (struct foo (a b c) ...


2

(This was originally a comment, but OP asked me to post it as an answer) If you want to have arbitrary runtime field names, then it sounds like you're duck-typing a dictionary not a struct... in which case you should use a dictionary. One characteristic of a Racket struct is that referencing a field can be faster precisely because it's a static offset ...


2

What about structs (Racket) or record-types (R6RS)? In Racket: #lang racket (struct cell (x y)) (define (ccons x y) (cell x y)) (define (ccar cl) (cell-x cl)) (define (ccdr cl) (cell-y cl)) (define (cpair? cl) (cell? cl)) (define x (ccons 1 2)) (cpair? x) => #t (ccar (ccons 1 2)) => 1 (ccdr (ccons 3 4)) => 4


1

There's no need to sort the values, we can extract the minimum and then find the corresponding key. Here's an idiomatic way in Racket to retrieve the key corresponding to the minimum value in the hash table: (define (key-min-value ht) (car ; extract the key of the minimum entry (argmin ; find the minimum in the entry list ...


1

Assuming you've got a list of animals and a function weight that takes one animal and gives you its weight, you mgiht be better off using apply and map here instead of doing the recursion yourself: (define (zoo-weight animals) (apply + (map weight animals))) map takes a function and a list and calls the function once for each thing in the list, e.g. ...


1

You almost got it! try something like this: (define (zoo-weight animals) (cond [(empty? animals) 0] [else (+ (weight (first animals)) (zoo-weight (rest animals)))])) The problem is that you can't say (first weight). What is weight? it's probably a function that applies to animals, or a variable. So, you wrote: "take the first ...


1

So my guess is that you are studying Essentials of Programming Languages and probably use Racket as your environment. If that is true, you should probably use cases here: (define (const-exp? e) (cases expression e (const-exp (num) #t) (else #f))) then > (const-exp? (const-exp 7)) #t > (const-exp? (var-exp 'x)) #f


1

You have to manually instantiate the polymorphism in this case: -> (map (inst identity Integer) '(1 2 3)) - : (Listof Integer) [more precisely: (Pairof Integer (Listof Integer))] '(1 2 3) The reason is explained in the Typed Racket Guide here: Typed Racket’s local type inference algorithm is currently not able to infer types for polymorphic ...


1

You can Un-check the option Enforce constant definition In the choose language menu in DrRacket In the Dynamic properties box. And as a note to your macro. Why do you specify a name for the test? The name is not placed in the list, and aside from defining it to cons it to all-tests it is never used. You can use a let instead. Unless of course your are ...


1

There are several mistakes in your code. You are missing parens around check. You are currently defining check as a variable, not as a procedure. You are missing a procedure to print. Print and return are not the same thing. The procedure will return what the last statement of the body of let returns. In your case, it will return 'runner if (> runner 0) ...


1

I think the appropriately "Scheme-ish" way to write a function that's defined recursively like that is to use memoization. If a function f is memoized, then when you call f(4) first it looks up 4 in a key-value table and if it finds it, returns the stored value. Otherwise, it simply calculates normally and then stores whatever it calculates in the table. ...


1

I have made several modifications to your code. I have marked my changes with comments above the function, explaining them. You problem was that you sorted guessed_list. There is no need to do so. I have tested it and it works. Keep in mind, that if you call game-loop with an empty list of guesses it will error. To fix that you need to test if guessed_list ...


1

Based on this explanation this should be as easy as: (define (pad0 str) ; add leading 0's to a string, 3 characters wide (~a #:width 3 #:align 'right #:left-pad-string "0" str)) (define (reverse-num n) ; reverse a number (string->number (list->string (reverse (string->list (pad0 (number->string n))))))) (define (magic xyz) ; the magic ...



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