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1

The problem is that your adding procedure adds two numbers, but you want to add a value to each one of the numbers in a list. If the list has a single element, it's as simple as: (define resultlist2 '(0)) (set! resultlist2 (list (adding (car resultlist2) 1))) resultlist2 => '(1) But if the list has more than one element and you want to add the same ...


0

The documentation you link to is for mit-scheme rather than to Racket. The documentation for Racket is here: http://docs.racket-lang.org/search/index.html?q=sort Note that the scheme in #lang scheme doesn't mean R5RS or R6RS, but rather the "MzScheme language". Nowadays one most people use #lang racket. #lang scheme (require rnrs/sorting-6) (define v ...


1

The referenced documentation is for MIT Scheme, you're using Racket with the #lang scheme language. Use the sort procedure instead, which returns a new sorted list: (define lst1 '(3 2 1 0)) (define lst2 (sort lst1 <)) lst1 => '(3 2 1 0) lst2 => '(0 1 2 3) If you need to modify the input list after sorting it, use: (define lst1 '(3 2 1 0)) ...


0

A literal translation of the text gives: (define (dragon order) (if (= order 1) (list 'R) (append (dragon (- order 1)) (list 'R) (replace-middle-with-L (dragon (- order 1)))))) Implement replace-middle-with-L and test with (dragon 3).


1

I think what you want is to recurse over the list of candidates (aloc), and for each one, compute his/her tally from all of the votes: (define (tally-by-all aloc alov) (cond [(empty? aloc) empty] [else (cons (make-voting-tally (first aloc) (top-votes-for (first aloc) alov)) (tally-by-all (rest aloc) alov)))] ) )


1

In this case, filter will be more useful than remove*: we want to obtain all the elements in wholelist which are also members of list1. Try this: (filter (lambda (e) (member e list1)) wholelist) => '(3 4 6 9 10) Of course we can do something similar using remove*, but it's less natural: (remove* (filter-not (lambda (e) (member e list1)) ...


0

So what you want is > (removelist secondlist (removelist firstlist wholelist)) '(9 11 12 14) If you need to split that into 2 steps, you need to bind the intermediary result of (removelist firstlist wholelist) with define, let or set! depending on the context: do you want to mutate the original binding - use set! (not recommended) if you can ...


1

[(> 0 (voting-tally-numVotes (first aloVT))) (cons (eliminate-no-votes (rest aloVT)))] is wrong, because cons needs 2 parameters it never gets executed because you actually test whether the number of votes is negative (0 > votes is the same as votes < 0) you try to skip an element here, and that should be the case when the count is 0 so you ...


3

In Scheme the list procedures do not update lists in-place, they return a new list as a result, and you must do something with the returned value - say, assign it to a variable or pass it along as parameter. What we can do is build a new list as a result of calling the procedure, and if needed assign it to a variable afterwards. For example: (define ...


1

The two datums ((1 . 2) 3 . 4) and ((1 . 2) . (3 . 4)) are exactly the same. So don't worry, you've got it right.


1

There are 2 errors in your code: 1) in the else clause, you should recursively call yourself, dropping the second element: (else (getlargest (cons (car a_list) (cddr a_list)))))) 2) you are missing the case of a list of only one element, where cadr will fail ((null? (cdr a_list)) (car a_list)) And I personally prefer to yield #f if the list is empty. ...


0

Here's an example of a pretty awesome use of scheme macros to create efficient robotics systems written in scheme


1

In Racket, there's a very idiomatic solution using iterations and comprehensions: (define (create-board dim) (for/list ([i (in-range 1 (add1 dim))]) (for/list ([j (in-range 1 (add1 dim))]) (+ (* 10 i) j)))) Alternatively, using only elementary list procedures: (define (create-board dim) (map (lambda (i) (map (lambda (j) ...


2

Are you working with Set Theory? If so, (remove*) solves the problem but it's not the procedure that describes set difference. Set difference is A\B is defined by: A\B={x,such that x is in A and x is not in B} Therefore you need a procedure that tells you wheter an element is in a list or not. Then your difference code would look like: (define ...


1

Your current procedure is failing at runtime. Even if it didn't, you're comparing one element with the next, but that won't work for finding a maximum, for instance in a list such as this it'll return 1, which is incorrect: '(10 2 0 1). There are other mistakes, for instance - why are you building a list as output, when the answer should be a number? also ...


1

You need to learn what a list is ang get quite intimate with it to be a good lisper. The list (1 2 3) is just visual sugar for the pairs (1 . (2 . (3 . ()))) and can be made with (cons 1 (cons 2 (cons 3 '()))) The structure (((((5) . 4) . 3) . 2) . 1) is not a list except (5) which is visual sugar for (5 . ()). It can be made with (cons (cons (cons (cons ...


1

Your definition of top-votes-for is wrong. Here's a skeletal version of a corrected solution: (define (top-votes-for cand alov) (cond ((empty? alov) 0) ((string=? (vote-choice1 <???>) cand) (add1 <???>)) (else (top-votes-for cand (rest alov))))) I've actually given you most of a solution. The rest of it should be ...


0

Can we get rid of your step 2, "store the result of #1 in list 1"? That sort of mutation just gives me the hives. I think you're just trying to remove the elements from both lists 2 and 3 from list 1. You might do it like this: (remove* (append list2 list3) list1) yields.... '(3 7 11 12 14 16 17)


0

You have to use the procedures defined in the struct to traverse the tree, first and rest won't work here - it's a tree, not a list. Try this: (define (tree->list tree) (if (eq? tree 'leaf) '() (append (list (node-val tree)) (tree->list (node-left tree)) (tree->list (node-right tree))))) It works as ...


2

The solution is simpler than you think, we don't even have to use append - in fact, you should avoid using append, whenever possible use cons for building an output list: this is because append does more work and can potentially lead to O(n^2) solutions. Try this instead: (define (merge-list lst1 lst2) (cond ((null? lst1) lst2) ; if the first list is ...


0

You can use map for this, simply create a new grade with the updated values. Just be careful if the current grade number plus 5 is greater than 100, in my code I added the restriction that no grade can be greater than 100. Assuming that you have implemented a procedure that converts grade numbers into letters (let's call it number->letter), this is one ...


3

Just call the append procedure, it does exactly what you need - when using a new procedure you should always refer to the documentation. In this case we don't have to write an explicit recursion, using the built-in function is enough: (define (list-push-front lst new-list) (append new-list lst)) For example: (list-push-front '(4 3 7 1 2 9) '(1 2)) ...


1

You can split the function into two parts - one that converts the tree into a list of numbers, and another that just uses foldl with that list, and foldl has the advantage of automatically doing the summation as an accumulator. (define (tree->list tree) (if (pair? tree) (append (tree->list (car tree)) (tree->list (cdr tree))) ...


0

;; best-grade: Lof[Grade] -> Number ;; find the highest Grade in list (define (best-grade log) (cond [(empty? log) 0] [(cons? log) (foldr max 0 (log->lon log))])) (check-expect (best-grade grades) 95) ;; log->lon: Lof[Grade] -> Lof[Number] ;; contains just the numerical grade (define (log->lon log) (map grade-num ...


0

Solved! Setting the g:paredit_electric_return to 0 did the trick. Actually, didn't search enough.


3

When we're evaluating a quoted expression, remember that this expression: 'x is just shorthand for this: (quote x). For example: '(x '(a b c)) Is equivalent to: (quote (x (quote (a b c)))) Now this expression will also return a quoted expression, which happens to start with yet another quoted expression: (cadr (quote (x (quote (a b c))))) ...


1

foldr (or foldl, for that matter) successively calls a procedure you provide with 2 arguments: the elements of the list, one by one the previous result your procedure returned, or the initial value if it's the first call Note: In Racket, the order of the arguments is the opposite of standard Scheme so foldr already does the looping for you. An example ...


4

This is correct: (grade-num (first log)) as (first log) is an struct of type grade. But this is not correct: (grade-num (rest log)) because (rest log) is a list, not a struct of type grade. EDIT: You seem to be confused about what parameters foldr expects. Take a look at the documentation of foldl (yes, foldl, not foldr). (Here)


2

Abstracting the comparison away is just a matter of adding a third argument to be used as your n-ary comparison function: (define (find-gen op los s) (cond [(empty? los) false] [(cons? los) (cond [(op s (first los)) true] [else (find-gen op (rest los) s)])])) (find-gen string=? (list "a" "b" "c") ...


1

An if expression has the for (if e0 e1 e2) where e0,e1,and,e2 are expressions. In your program you have: (if e0 ('() ...) e2) This means that if e0 is true, then ('() ...) is evaluated. Here '() is the empty list also known as null. The expression ('() ...) will attempt to call '() with the result of ..., and thus give an error. Fix this error, ...


3

http://docs.racket-lang.org/guide/characters.html This part of the documentation explains it very clearly. So what you can do is the following: > (char->integer #\a) 97 > (char->integer #\b) 98 > (char->integer #\A) 65 Using this you can use a function as shown below: (define (to-letter n) (let ((charnum (+ n 96))) ...


2

vector-map applies a function to each element of a vector. (vector-map - (vector 1 2 3)) calculates (vector (- 1) (- 2) (- 3)) and the final result is (vector -1 -2 -3) In your example the function to apply is printRow. Since printRow as a side effect print the value (this is an assumption) the effect is that all elements are printed. The result ...


1

There are a few fishy things about your question: the operation + should not be a string the way you express your list, null is actually the symbol null and not the empty list your elements are not consistently represented as (father leftSon rightSon) 2 + 3 is 5 so the result you give seems incorrect but assuming this is really what you want, it's a ...


1

In Racket a pair allocated by cons is immutable by design - therefore there are no set-car!. To allocated a mutable pair, use mcons. To mutate a mutable pair, use set-mcar! and set-mcdr!. Here is a complete program: #lang racket (define p (mcons 1 2)) (set-mcar! p 3) p


0

$ racket Welcome to Racket v5.3.5. -> (~a "abc" "def") "abcdef" -> (~a "abc" 'xyz 7 ) "abcxyz7" ->


2

Just a word on terminology: what you're really looking for are symbols, not letters ;-) (define (first-syms x) (if (and (pair? x) (symbol? (car x))) (cons (car x) (first-syms (cdr x))) '()))


3

(define (take-while p l) (let loop ((o '()) (l l)) (if (and (not (null? l)) (p (car l))) (loop (cons (car l) o) (cdr l)) (reverse o)))) (define (up-to-first-digit l) (take-while (lambda (x) (not (number? x))) l)) (up-to-first-digit '(q w c 9 5 6)) ;=> (q w c)


0

Here is an example: #lang racket (require 2htdp/image) (define (color-add c1 c2) (make-color (quotient (+ (color-red c1) (color-red c2)) 2) (quotient (+ (color-green c1) (color-green c2)) 2) (quotient (+ (color-blue c1) (color-blue c2)) 2))) (define width 100) (define height 100) (define background (rectangle width ...


0

You don't actually need to turn each image into a list of colors. The overlay function and friends will compose images for you: (define (compose-two-images img1 img2) (overlay img1 img2)) I'm not sure exactly how this fits into the sample code you posted, you may want to be more specific about what outerProcedure is supposed to do.


1

Try this: (define (longer-list list1 list2) ; use `or` to check if either condition is true (if (or (not (list? list1)) (not (list? list2))) false <do something else here>)) Explanation: just check both arguments to see if either one is not a list and return false if that's the case. Otherwise, just do whatever you want to do in the ...


2

{{ignored} ignored} is Racket's printer output for the mutable version of ((ignored) ignored). Let's use the normal cons cells version to answer this. With ((ignored) ignored), the car of that is (ignored) and not ignored, so your comparison would indeed be false. But you can get ignored two ways: 1. using caar ((car (car x))), or 2. using cadr ((car (cdr ...


2

You can use only-in to require only specific functions from a module. For example this evaluates without error: #lang racket (require 2htdp/image (only-in racket/gui/base play-sound)) (define (f) (play-sound "/path/to/file" #t))


2

In Scheme you should prefer functional programming style solutions. In other words: it's not a good idea to mutate a global variable (graph in this case), it's better to receive the graph as parameter and return a new modified graph with the result. For example, this solves your problem: (define (delete-node node graph) (cons (remove node (car graph)) ...


2

Rackets default language was renamed from #!scheme to #!racket when the whole thing changed name from PLT to Racket. #!mzscheme is an old version of this which is made as a legacy language. You switch language by making the language name the very first line in your source files. also instead of #!language you can write it more verbose as #lang language. It ...


1

There are several mistakes in your code, try this: (define (abN? arbol N) (cond [(number? (car arbol)) (if (= N 1) "Arbol Binario 1" "No es un arbol binario 1")] [(list? (car arbol)) (if (= (length (car arbol)) N) "Arbol Binario N" "No es un arbol binario N")] [else (error "Dato de entrada ...


0

After some digging through the Geiser source I found in geiser/elisp/geiser-load.el the line: (setq geiser-scheme-dir "/c/Users/James/AppData/Roaming/.emacs.d/el-get/geiser/scheme") Which was probably generated incorrectly by MinGW make. I changed it to: (setq geiser-scheme-dir "c:/Users/James/AppData/Roaming/.emacs.d/el-get/geiser/scheme") After ...


2

This is a straightforward implementation of how to search in a tree, it's just that this time we have three possible subtrees: (define lookup (lambda (tr x) (cond ((null? tr) #f) ((equal? (first tr) x) #t) ; don't use eqv?, equal? is more general (else (or (lookup (second tr) x) (lookup (third tr) x) ...


0

An easy, self-contained solution would be: (define (num-pairs-occurences lst) (foldl (lambda (e r) (if (or (null? r) (not (= (caar r) e))) (cons (list e 1) r) (cons (list e (add1 (cadar r))) (cdr r)))) null (sort lst >))) Basically, you sort the list first, and then you fold over it. If the ...


1

Most Scheme implementations provide records via SRFI 9. So in your case, you can define a recipe record type like so: (define-record-type <recipe> (recipe salt sauce) recipe? (salt recipe-salt) (sauce recipe-sauce)) Then you can use it like this: > (define salty-ketchup (recipe 5 "ketchup")) > (recipe-salt salty-ketchup) 5 > ...


0

It's a bit trickier than you imagine. As you've probably noticed, we must remove duplicate elements in the output list. For this, is better that we define a remove-duplicates helper function (also using abstract list functions) - in fact, this is so common that is a built-in function in Racket, but not available in your current language settings: (define ...



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