Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

This looks quite better to me x = sorted([lower_bound, x, upper_bound])[1] However if you want to consider performance, then if/elif is the best implementation.


4

Numpy has arange and r_ which look something like this: import numpy as np print(np.arange(1, 3, .5)) # [ 1. 1.5 2. 2.5] print(np.r_[1:3:.5]) # [ 1. 1.5 2. 2.5] Notice that it is a little different than matlab, first the order of the stop and step are reversed in numpy compared to matlab, and second the stop is not included the the result. You ...


3

There are a few approaches I can think of. We can try them and see which is fastest. However, you aren't going to be able to avoid a copy. There is no way to handle discontinuous ranges without a copy. concat >>> %%timeit -n 10000 data = pd.DataFrame(np.random.sample((10000,10))) ... result = pd.concat((data[100:150], data[200:300])) ... 10000 ...


3

You're probably using Python3, where xrange has become range.


2

It would appear maximum address length in Excel is 255 characters. However you almost never need to build an address as a string. Dim MyRange As Range Dim c As Range Dim Line As Long For Line = 1 To 100 Set c = Sheet.Cells(Line, "A") If Len(c.Value) = 0 Then If MyRange Is Nothing Then Set MyRange = c Else Set MyRange = ...


2

Use the OFFSET function. First 30000: SELECT * FROM artist t1 ORDER BY count DESC LIMIT 30000; 30001 to 60000 SELECT * FROM artist t1 ORDER BY count DESC LIMIT 30000 OFFSET 30001; 60001 to 90000 SELECT * FROM artist t1 ORDER BY count DESC LIMIT 30000 OFFSET 60001;


2

Activate and select emulate user keystrokes and even if you set Application.ScreenUpdating to false, you don't need to really select objects. You should generally avoid these methods (see here an interesting article about why and when to select:http://dailydoseofexcel.com/archives/2004/04/27/beginning-vba-select-and-activate/). Declare variables (set rng...) ...


2

You could do: x = max(min(some_value, upper_bound), lower_bound) This is pythonic because it's a terse one liner, and it's more efficient than creating a list and sorting it.


2

Another nice way to check this: (with the pattern match operator) if 2...5 ~= 4 { // do something }


2

You should use a generator function, range() does not suit your problem. You can convert your fib function to a generator by giving yield a inside the while loop, that would make the function keep spitting out fibonacci numbers till n and you can find sum like that. Example of generator - >>> def fib(n): ... a, b = 1,2 ... while a < n: ...


1

You can combine boolean conditions, and pass them to the subscript operator: data[((100 <= data.index) & (data.index < 150)) | ((200 <= data.index) & (data.index < 300))] (Note the parentheses, BTW - they are unseemly, but the order of precedence requires them.)


1

@hamstergene is right. You can't ++ a range literal, just like you can't ++ a regular old Int. For example, you can't write: let x = 5++ Your operator works if you assign the range to a variable and then call the operator: var r = 1..<3 r++ // r == 1..<4


1

The xrange object is not already an iterator, but an iterable object. You get the iterator by feeding it to the iter function. The zip function implicitly calls iter on all of its arguments, so it produces two parallel iterators over the xrange object. In the second example, you call iter once by hand, so you are comparing apples to oranges. To get the ...


1

An xrange is not any sort of iterator. People keep calling it a generator, but it's not; an xrange is an immutable sequence, like a tuple: >>> x = xrange(5) >>> x[2] 2 >>> for i in x: ... print i ... 0 1 2 3 4 >>> for i in x: ... print i ... 0 1 2 3 4 As with any other sequence type, each time you request an ...


1

I think you have a miss understanding about xrange types. based on pythons documentation about xrange type : The xrange type is an immutable sequence which is commonly used for looping. The advantage of the xrange type is that an xrange object will always take the same amount of memory, no matter the size of the range it represents. There are no ...


1

Let me give you a short example of what you may be able to do in the code you provided. Instead of Rows(row2).Select you could also write Set CurrentRow = Rows(row2) Of course you would have to declare the CurrentRow as a range beforehand (Dim CurrentRow as Range) It would also be advisable to release the CurrentRow variable when you are done with it by ...


1

Maybe you could create an array with all the IDs from the First List, then check if you find the same IDs in the Second List, and create an array with the row numbers of the double IDs. With the last array you could make one big selection with all the rows you need, and copy it all at once. I don't know if this speeds it up a lot but maybe you can try.


1

I would remove the Select statements entirely. Try this, no ranges needed. If (ID = Cells(row2, GtId2)) Then Sheets("Second List").Rows(row2).Copy Sheets("Found").Rows(2).Insert Shift:=xlDown Sheets("First List").Rows(rw).Copy Sheets("Found").Rows(2).Insert Shift:=xlDown found = found + 1 End If


1

If you want to get a sum of floats, just use the code: fname = input("Enter file name: ") count = 0 total = 0 fh = open(fname) for line in fh: if not line.startswith("X-DSPAM-Confidence:"): continue count += 1 halo = line.find("0") gh = line[halo:] tg = gh.rstrip() ha = float(tg) total += ha print total


1

You're finding the last column and putting the value in LastRow, then using that as the row argument to .Cells. If you need the last row, do something like this: With FlowWkbs(f).Sheets(w) LastRow = .Cells(.Rows.Count, 7).End(xlUp).Row .Range("G1").FormulaR1C1 = "Normal_0to1" .Range("G2").FormulaR1C1 = "0" .Cells(LastRow, 7).FormulaR1C1 = ...


1

The inverse process is simpler: given a range and a parent element, the process is Create a new range that encompasses the contents of the element Set the end of that range to the start boundary of the range you're measuring Get the length of the string returned by calling toString() on the measuring range. This is your start offset. Get the length of the ...


1

With commander, you can use the range option. Example from the docs: function range(val) { return val.split('..').map(Number); } program .version('0.0.1') .usage('[options] <file ...>') .option('-r, --range <a>..<b>', 'A range', range) .parse(process.argv);



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible