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6

Don't use Nokogiri at all if you want the raw source of a web page. Just fetch the web page directly as a string, and then do not feed that to Nokogiri. For example: require 'open-uri' html = open('http://phrogz.net').read puts html.length #=> 8461 puts html #=> ...raw source of the page... If, on the other hand, you want the ...


6

If you want it with a 2d contour, you can also use the package ggplot2. Some example code is shown in this question: gradient breaks in a ggplot stat_bin2d plot Adjusted slightly: x <- rnorm(10000)+5 y <- rnorm(10000)+5 df <- data.frame(x,y) require(ggplot2) p <- ggplot(df, aes(x, y)) p <- p + stat_bin2d(bins = 20) p Here's the output ...


6

The ggplot is elegant and fast and pretty, as usual. But if you want to use base graphics (image, contour, persp) and display your actual frequencies (instead of the smoothing 2D kernel), you have to first obtain the binnings yourself and create a matrix of frequencies. Here's some code (not necessarily elegant, but pretty robust) that does 2D binning and ...


5

It depends on what you mean by "more efficient". If your measure is time, then it can be more efficient. The technique you're referring to is using a data URI. Typically you take the image data and base64 encode it so it contains only ASCII characters. base64 encoding data has the effect of making it 33% larger (every 6 bits become 8). So this works for ...


4

If you would like to save the file one the server rather than have the visitor download it, you won't need the headers. Headers are for telling the client what you are sending them, which is in this case nothing (although you are likely displaying a page linking to you newly created PDF or something). So, instead just use a function such as ...


4

Guessing by the looks, it's indeed a normal array used somewhere in the game. In older days, pretty much every game content was hardcoded; now you can simply open a file and load the data, because the HDDs (and more often SSDs) got so much faster. Older games were also compiled as plain C executable; in modern IDEs such as Visual Studio (or pretty much ...


4

In linux you can use xxd command for this functionality. Usage: xxd -i fname > abc.h This will create a new header file with proper formatting.


3

Assuming your file doesn't have a header and is tightly packed, try the following: with open('filename', 'rb') as f: im = Image.fromstring('L;16', (width, height), f.read()) # also try 'L;16B', 'I;16', and 'I;16B' im.show() The 'L' formats will truncate from 16 bits per pixel to 8; the 'I' formats will keep it at 16 bits per pixel but might be harder ...


3

Bivariate density estimates can be done with MASS::kde2d, or KernSmooth::bkde2D (both supplied with the base R distribution). The latter uses an algorithm based on the fast Fourier transform over a grid of points, and is very fast. The result can be plotted with contour or persp or similar functions in other graphing packages. Using your data: ...


3

They aren't in a text format. If you can't figure out where the raw data files are kept either by looking or reading the documentation you're unlikely to be able to make much use of them. I think this is what's known as an XY question - try asking a question about what you're trying to achieve.


3

I tested your code and the problem seems to be the bit of multiplication done to point.y before calculating pixelIndex: CGFloat y = 100 * point.y / imageHeight; int pixelIndex = (int)y * 4; // 4 bytes per color I removed this from your code, and it works. Also changed point to an int to match the imageWidth parameter, and bounded it to always be 0 <= ...


2

For completeness, you can also use the hist2d{gplots} function. It seems to be the most straightforward for a 2D plot: library(gplots) # data is in variable df # define bin sizes bin_size <- 0.5 xbins <- (max(df$x) - min(df$x))/bin_size ybins <- (max(df$y) - min(df$y))/bin_size # create plot hist2d(df, same.scale=TRUE, nbins=c(xbins, ybins)) ...


2

There is no way to get the logs, but .. The Google Analytics API will let you extract your data out of the system. There are limits to what you can do: you are limited to 7 dimensions and 10 metrics per requests. There is also a quota of 10k requests per day per profile (view). some of the information you are talking about is not available. Unless ...


2

I recently bought this keyboard, and subsequently ran into a blog post by Debian developer Julian Danjou on using upower with Logitech unifying devices and the solar K750 in particular. The post mentions that his work for a lumincance property might land in the next version of upower,v0.9.19. Until that is there, I intend to try out the version in their ...


2

It sounds as though you need either a 3rd Party library or write one yourself But I'm not sure about the internals of networked printers function, but I were you I would ask myself: Does the printer broadcast it's IP Address to the network? If not what functionality does it supply to make it self discoverable to other devices? Does the printer respond ...


2

You can use a BufferedImage and use getGraphics() to get hold of a Graphics2D object that paints onto this image. If you're after painting GUI components (if your "label" refers to JLabel for instance) you could have a look at these questions: How to get a BufferedImage from a Component in java? Java/Swing offscreen rendering (Cobra HTMLPanel -> ...


2

First, as the commenters said, you should look at why you're trying to do this, and see if it's really a good idea. Most apps which try to circumvent the normal UI the user has for using his/her computer are "bad", in various ways. That said, you could try finding a well-known file which will always be on the system and has some slack in the block size for ...


2

Obviously if you do not intend to change anything to a file you could quit vim using :q!. As @RunHolt points out, vim and xxd can change a binary file. e.g. changing LF to CRLF or appending an LF character at the end of file. You can prevent this by setting the binary option: Either start vim as: vim -b filename or type :set binary before loading the file ...


2

You probably did not load the file as a binary file with vim -b. I.e. the damage was already done. xxd is a red herring here; xxd followed by xxd -r is transparent. It is intended for editing binary files. xxd does not add any bytes; it produces an accurate hexdump, which is accurately reversed by xxd -r (unless you corrupt it). For viewing only, you could ...


2

MongoDB is database, so really it's designed to store data, not "raw files" ... To access your files "directly" yes, I suppose you would need to import the files into MongoDB (however that's pretty easy.) GridFS MongoDB has a file-system of sorts called GridFS "a specification for storing large files in MongoDB." By default, MongoDB has a 4mb limit on ...


1

A PDF is a binary object. You need to write the bytes directly to a file. Turning into text will probably break it. Does it start with %%PDF- and end with %%EOF?


1

Okay, well after a lot of research I found out that to preserve the binary data in the string that typically you convert it to Base64 encoding. On a complete guess I decoded the string out of Base64 and dropped the bytes into the pdf file, and lo and behold I had a pdf that could be opened! Thanks for the answers and I hope this helps someone in the future! ...


1

There is a size limit to this. I don't know for certain off the top of my head, but 2K seems about right. Remember that there is overhead for base64 encoding something. If you have a 500 byte image, this might be fine, but for other things, no. Really though, you shouldn't be doing this right now for compatibility. Maybe in the coming years...


1

It depends on how many images you're going to be sending and how often they get requested. Having the images in base 64 is absolutely more efficient then 30 http requests. You could also implement caching of each image if they get requested frequently. This is something we've implemented in my workplace. We store the base64 in a temp directory and check if ...


1

Since the headphone jack is on the other side of a couple of D>A converters, I guess you'd need a codec that converts to modem tones. Hope you files are really small 'cos transfer rate would be pretty slow, even if you could figure out how to use both channels. Just 'tooth 'em. Rgds, Martin


1

1.) You can use NSBitmapImageRep's -bitmapData to get the raw pixel data. Unfortunately, CG (NSBitmapImageRep's backend) does not support native unpremultiplication so you would have to unpremultiply yourself. The colorspace used in this will be the same as present in the file. Here is how to unpremultiply the image data: NSBitmapImageRep *imageRep = ...


1

I did a search on Google recently and I found this website: https://github.com/aheadley/logitech-solar-k750-linux It might be helpful to you and the Linux world. I'm more of a Windows user, so I can't advise much to you with Ubuntu/Linux and Python coding. The source code is in Python language. Hope this helps you get somewhere.


1

That's quite backwards from the normal way of doing things, isn't it! You have two main options: Keep the Python scripts as they are, run them using fork()/exec() or whatever is appropriate to your platform, and parse their output in C++; Use CPython's well-documented API to embed it in your C++ program, and invoke the scripts that way.


1

Use implode. $str = "k6s6k6s6c1u6t661w651z6k6z6z6k611"; $arr = str_split($str, 2); $str2 = implode("", substr_replace($arr ,"",-1)); echo $str2;


1

Most printers have some sort of self-test function that will print some information about the printer including it's IP address. See if it mentions it in the manual online. It is usually something like holding down the feed button while turning it on. Once you have the IP address it should be fairly simple to open a connection to it and send it data.



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