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39

Here is a quick example of how to perform incremental completion of file system paths. I've modified your example, organizing it into a class where methods named complete_[name] indicate top-level commands. I've switched the completion function to use the internal readline buffer to determine the state of the overall completion, which makes the state logic ...


34

You could do: i = raw_input("Please enter name[Jack]:") or "Jack" This way, if user just presses return without entering anything, "i" will be assigned "Jack".


32

There's an easy solution that doesn't use threads (at least not explicitly): use select to know when there's something to be read from stdin: import sys from select import select timeout = 10 print "Enter something:", rlist, _, _ = select([sys.stdin], [], [], timeout) if rlist: s = sys.stdin.readline() print s else: print "No input. Moving ...


16

s = raw_input() numbers = map(int, s.split()) and add the numbers separated by spaces.


14

For that you use the readline module. Simplest code I can think: import readline COMMANDS = ['extra', 'extension', 'stuff', 'errors', 'email', 'foobar', 'foo'] def complete(text, state): for cmd in COMMANDS: if cmd.startswith(text): if not state: return cmd else: state -= 1 ...


14

Unless you've got a typo, the issue may be in this line where you assign the file handle to selffp not self.fp: selffp=file("detailing.dat","rb") If that is a typo, and your code actually opens the file to self.fp, then you may wish to verify that the file actually has contents (ie: that the previous pickle worked)... the error suggests that the file is ...


14

getpass hides the input, just replace raw_input after importing the module getpass, like this: import getpass . . . pa = getpass.getpass()


13

I recently encountered this problem, and would like to leave this solution here for future reference. These solutions clear the pending raw_input (readline) text from the terminal, print the new text, then reprint to the terminal what was in the raw_input buffer. This first program is pretty simple, but only works correctly when there is only 1 line of text ...


12

Since the Python 2.x version of input() is essentially useless, you can simply overwrite it by raw_input: try: input = raw_input except NameError: pass In general, I would not try to aim at code that works with both, Python 2.x and 3.x, but rather write your code in a way that it works on 2.x and you get a working 3.x version by using the 2to3 ...


10

Bind raw_input to input in Python 2: try: input = raw_input except NameError: pass Now input will return a string in Python 2 as well.


9

do totPrimes = int(totPrimes) while count < totPrimes: .................. raw_input gives you a string you must convert to an integer or float before making any numeric comparison


9

text = "helloworld42" numbers = sum(c.isdigit() for c in text) letters = sum(c.isalpha() for c in text)


9

What you're running into is that raw_input gives you a byte string, but the string you're comparing against is a Unicode string. Python 2 tries to convert them to a common type to compare, but this fails because it can't guess the encoding of the byte string - so, your solution is to do the conversion explicitly. As a rule, you should keep all strings in ...


9

isinstance(raw_input("number: ")), int) always yields False because raw_input return string object as a result. Use try: int(...) ... except ValueError: number = raw_input("number: ") try: int(number) except ValueError: print False else: print True or use str.isdigit: print raw_input("number: ").isdigit() NOTE The second one yields False ...


8

In dheerosaur's answer If user press Enter to select default value in reality it wont be saved as python considers it as '' string so Extending a bit on what dheerosaur. default = "Jack" user_input = raw_input("Please enter name: %s"%default + chr(8)*4) if not user_input: user_input = default Fyi .. The ASCII value of backspace is 08


8

The raw_input call is blocking, but you can use asyncore on it too. You need to add an third player i.e. like this: class CmdlineClient(asyncore.file_dispatcher): def __init__(self, sender, file): asyncore.file_dispatcher.__init__(self, file) self.sender = sender def handle_read(self): self.sender.buffer += self.recv(1024) ...


8

Just try to make it a float and handle the exception thrown if it can't be converted. try: amount_per_month = float( raw_input('What is the monthly cost?') ) except (ValueError, TypeError) as e: pass # wasn't valid TypeError is redundant here, but if the conversion was operating on other Python objects (not just strings), then it would be required ...


8

You can (should) use a dictionary where words are mapped to definitions: >>> word_dct = {"Adherent" : "a person who follows or upholds a leader, cause, etc.; supporter; follower."} >>> word=raw_input("Enter a word: ") Enter a word: Adherent >>> word_dct[word] 'a person who follows or upholds a leader, cause, etc.; supporter; ...


7

%r converts to the repr of height, you should use %s instead If you are using Python >=2.6, you can write it this way instead print "So you're {height} tall.".format(height=height)


7

Your line should read raw_input("Hello %r, what is your age? " % firstname) instead of raw_input("Hello %r, what is your age? ") % firstname Otherwise, you would not format your "Hello %r, ..." string, but the resulting string of the call to raw_input.


6

Why don't you just mark the thread as daemonic? From the docs: A thread can be flagged as a “daemon thread”. The significance of this flag is that the entire Python program exits when only daemon threads are left. The initial value is inherited from the creating thread. The flag can be set through the daemon attribute.


6

The problem is, that raw_input returns a string (not a number), and for some odd historical reasons, strings can be compared (for ordering) to any other kind of object by default, but the results are... odd. Python 2.6.5 (r265:79063, Oct 28 2010, 20:56:23) [GCC 4.5.0 20100604 [gcc-4_5-branch revision 160292]] on linux2 Type "help", "copyright", "credits" ...


6

That's because you generally should avoid interactive user input if it's not a key feature. In your example: Reading from stdin or the command line allows to combine different programs and run them in scripts and so on. Imagine you execute a lot of code and sit in front of the screen waiting for the input request to come. Wasn't it better to specify all ...


6

Are you sure of the fact that your 10k long word doesn't contain newlines? raw_input([prompt]) If the prompt argument is present, it is written to standard output without a trailing newline. The function then reads a line from input, converts it to a string (stripping a trailing newline), and returns that. When EOF is read, EOFError is raised. ...


6

I suspect it is the same as WM_MOUSEWHEEL: The high-order word indicates the distance the wheel is rotated, expressed in multiples or divisions of WHEEL_DELTA, which is 120. A positive value indicates that the wheel was rotated forward, away from the user; a negative value indicates that the wheel was rotated backward, toward the user. The low-order word ...


6

The function that you want is isatty ("is a TTY") on filehandles. You can test it on sys.stdin, sys.stdout or sys.stderr as you need. >>> import sys >>> sys.stdin.isatty() True Incidentally, that is what Python is doing too to detect whether or not to show the interactive prompt (just try cat | python)


6

raw_input returns a string not an integer: So, >>> 1 <= "4" <= 20 False Use int(): i = int(raw_input('>> ')) Use just if, if you're only taking a single input from user: if 1 <= i <= 20 : print "Ok adding %d to numbers set: " % i numbers.append(i) print "Okay the numbers set is now: " , numbers Use while ...


6

You need to convert user_limit to Int: raw_input() return value is str and the statement is using i which is int def numbers(limit): i = 0 numbers = [] while i < limit: numbers.append(i) i = i + 1 print numbers user_limit = int(raw_input("Give me a limit ")) numbers(user_limit) Output: Give me a limit 8 [0, 1, 2, 3, ...


6

Change your variables into a dictionary and then use it to lookup the corresponding integer based on the user's input: values = {'loose': 5, 'accurate': 10, 'extreme': 15} method = raw_input('Would you like the calculation to be loose, accurate, or extreme in its precision?: ') #the user would either type loose, accurate, or extreme ...


5

best: if __name__ == '__main__': while True: entered = raw_input("Please enter your three-letter code or leave a blank line to quit: ") if not entered: break if len(entered) != 3: print "%r is NOT three letters, it's %d" % (entered, len(entered)) continue if not entered.isalpha(): print "%r are NOT all letters -- please ...



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