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0

Replace the second if condition by elif. elif can be used as many times as you want until the condition matches but its better practice to have the last condition as else (which is like default statement when other conditions have failed)


0

you can always use if for the first conditional, elif for any number of other conditionals (if the input is in the second list in your instance) and else if the input is not in any of those lists, your indentation is also a little messed up,nesting if statements inside each other will only run the nested conditional if the first statement is true, I'd also ...


0

The indent level is incorrect. Spend one more space for the second if statement. or 1 less space and elif instead of the second if.


0

I only add this because you should write a simple function for reuse. Here is the one I wrote: def default_input( message, defaultVal ): if defaultVal: return raw_input( "%s [%s]:" % (message,defaultVal) ) or defaultVal else: return raw_input( "%s " % (message) )


1

You cannot "use raw_input() with argv". argv is supplied with data that you specify before running the program. raw_input() is a Python function, i.e. something that your program can do. The command line - where you type the python command in order to run your program - is a completely separate thing from the program itself.


-1

The "too many values to unpack" error is because you're trying to unpack four values from argv, and it doesn't have exactly four elements. I can't quite tell what argv is from your question (typing python ex13.py raw_input() raw_input() raw_input() into the shell will give you problems due to the parentheses), but you could find out by printing it.


0

argv stands for argument value and it represents the arguments passed to your program when it is launched from the command line. For example, if your program is called example.py, and you run it like this: $ example.py 'hello' Then argv is hello. raw_input is a way to prompt the user for some input. Basically, it will stop the program, display some text ...


2

The word in is an operator in Python. It tests if its left argument is contained within its right hand argument. With strings (which both "0" and choice are), it does a substring check. So, "0" in choice tests to see if the choice string contains one or more zeros. The same thing is done for "1". So, the test "0" in choice or "1" in choice tests if there is ...


2

choice = raw_input("> ") if "0" in choice or "1" in choice: how_much = int(choice) In this code, the first line of code evaluates the right side of the = sign, namely, take an input from the user while displaying the text >. Once that input has been taken, store in a variable called choice. Then, this line if "0" in choice or "1" in choice uses ...


3

The u is not part of the string, any more than the quotes are. The u'go' is just how Python represents a Unicode string whose value is go. You do not need to "concatenate the u" or anything like that. The raw_input will return 'go', rather than u'go', because it's reading in an encoded byte string. But in Python 2.x, if you compare those two strings, ...


1

Well, after days of pulling what little hair I have left out, I could find no rhyme or reason as to why this was happening. So, I devised a rather ugly hack to fake an exclusive mode. First I removed the NOLEGACY and CAPTUREMOUSE flags from the device registration and then I just locked the cursor to the center of the window that was receiving the input ...


0

I don't know if my approach is the best one, or not, but this is how I do it for the first item in your question: When I process WM_INPUT using GetRawInputData(...), I check to see if the device handle passed back by the RAWINPUTHEADER structure (contained within the RAWINPUT structure returned from the function) is the same as the device I want to use. If ...



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