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1

You might find sets useful here. sentence = "I feel great" words = sentence.split(" ") if set("good", "fine", "great").intersects(words): print("user is good!") if set("bad", "poorly", "sick").intersects(words): print("user is bad") set is a special type of container, like a list or a dict. It ignores repeated entries, but is extremely fast at ...


-1

I will try to make it as easy as possible for you to read the comment. # define response and keywords list response_and_keywords = {"Cheer up":["sad","bad"], "Cool!":["good","amazing"]} # get user input user_input = raw_input("How are you ?") # loop through the dictionary for response,keywords in ...


0

Well I'm not sure of having a program understand the english language. It will only take a string literal as a string literal. "Good" does not mean Good or Bad to the Interpreter in Python. What I'd suggest is making a dictionary of all of the good phrases you want, such as I'm good, Feelin' great, I'm A OK. You can store all of these good feeling string ...


0

Python2.7 get raw_input and set a default value: Put this in a file called a.py: import readline def rlinput(prompt, prefill=''): readline.set_startup_hook(lambda: readline.insert_text(prefill)) try: return raw_input(prompt) finally: readline.set_startup_hook() default_value = "an insecticide" stuff = rlinput("Caffeine is: ", ...


0

Try this instead of readline: cat("a string please: ") a <- readLines("stdin",n=1); cat(a, "\n")


1

If you run a script containing those function calls, it will work correctly. The problem in this case is that you are pasting a line after the "readline" call. I have just tested this and it works fine, as it does in production code used by the company I work for. test.R: askForName <- function(firstOrLast){ if(firstOrLast == "first"){ x <- ...


1

response is a string element. But you want an list. so you need to parse the user input to a list. You should use input() instead of raw_input(), which parses the user input, or use eval(raw_input()) (eval() parses a string to an element... But I suggest to surround this function with try..except, to check if the user input is valid, and also loop if ...


2

raw_input returns a string, in fact np.flatnonzero(np.array('adfsgh')) produces array([0]) too. So just make a list of ints: In [1]: import numpy as np In [2]: response = raw_input("What is your move? ") What is your move? 0,1,0 In [3]: positions = np.array(map(int, response.split(','))) In [4]: changing_positions = np.flatnonzero(positions) In [5]: ...


2

In Python 2.x the raw_input function will display all characters pressed, and return upon receiving a newline. If you want different behaviour you'll have to use a different function. Here's a portable version of getch for Python, it will return every key press: # Copied from: stackoverflow.com/questions/510357/python-read-a-single-character-from-the-user ...


1

raw_input reads an entire line of input. The line you're inputting is made visible to you, and you can do things like type some text: aiplanes go left a few characters to fix your typo: airplanes go back to the end and delete a character because you didn't mean to make it plural: airplane and then hit Enter, and raw_input will return "airplane". It ...


0

Since you're using Regular Expressions to match the user input, you can use the re.IGNORECASE flag to re.compile which will perform a case-insensitive match. your original code example updated: import urllib2 from bs4 import BeautifulSoup import re user_input = raw_input ("Search for Team = ") headers = { 'User-Agent' : 'Mozilla/5.0' } req = ...


0

You could solve your problem like this: input = raw_input("Give me the input [name number number number]: ").split(" ") name = input[0] floats = map(float, input[1:]) print "I'm your name ", name print "I'm your floats ", floats print "I'm a sample average ", sum(floats)/len(floats) You can get any float with: floats[i]


2

You could refactor this a little, but what you have works and isn't that bulky or bad. >>> user_input = raw_input('Enter your name and three numbers: ').strip().split() Enter your name and three numbers: Tom 25 30 20 >>> name = user_input[0] >>> scores = map(float, user_input[1:]) >>> name 'Tom' >>> scores [25.0, ...


1

The problem is quite simple : you made a typo in raw_input (on the line with middle), using m instead of n. Also, randint should take 2 arguments (assuming this is python), so you are missing a comma



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