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35

It is hard to tell at this point because Reactor is still a sketch and I (Akka tech lead) do not have insight into where it will go. It will be interesting to see if Reactor becomes a competitor to Akka, we are looking forward to that. As far as I can see, from your requirements list Reactor is missing resilience (i.e. what supervision gives you in Akka) ...


29

Reactor is not bound to Spring, its an optional module. We want Reactor to be portable, a foundation as Jon outlined. I won't be confident about pushing in production as we are not even Milestone (1.0.0.SNAPSHOT), in that regard, I would have a deeper look at Akka which is a fantastic asynchronous framework IMO. Also consider Vert.x and Finagle which might ...


24

This is an excellent question and the answer will change over the weeks to come. We can't make any promises of what inter-node communication will look like right now just because it's too early. We still have some pieces to put together before we can demonstrate clustering in Reactor. With that said, just because Reactor doesn't do inter-node comms OOTB ...


17

Lucky for you, it is easy to reduce the number of reactors, specifically, to 1: You can only ever have a single reactor, in a single thread, in any given Twisted process. If you try to have more, nothing will work. The whole point of a reactor, actually, is to facilitate having multiple sources of events combined into a single thread. If you want to ...


13

Ideally, you wouldn't set the variable to a value and stop the reactor, you'd call reactor.stop(). Sometimes you're not in the main thread, and this isn't allowed, so you might need to call reactor.callFromThread. Here are three working examples: # in the main thread: reactor.stop() # in a non-main thread: reactor.callFromThread(reactor.stop) # A looping ...


12

In case it's not obvious, It's called the reactor because it reacts to things. The loop is how it reacts. One line at a time: while True: It's not actually while True; it's more like while not loop.stopped. You can call reactor.stop() to stop the loop, and (after performing some shut-down logic) the loop will in fact exit. But it is portrayed in the ...


12

Yes, every module in Python is always global, or, to put it better, a singleton: when you do from twisted.internet import reactor, Python's import mechanism first checks sys.modules['twisted.internet.reactor'], and, if that exists, returns said value; only if it doesn't exist (i.e., the first time a module is imported) is the module actually loaded for the ...


11

The Reactor pattern is used with worker threads to overcome a common scenario in applications: You need to do a lot of work eventually but you don't know which work and when and creating threads is an expensive operation. The idea is that you create a lot of threads which don't do anything at first. Instead, they "wait for work". When work arrives (in the ...


11

There isn't a single document that lists the pros and cons of RxJava versus Reactor. We don't see it being a mutually exclusive relationship. If you need the holistic Reactive approach of RxJava Observables, then use that and maybe add Reactor as a Scheduler implementation to get the high speed dispatching. If you're more interested in the functional, ...


9

I assume you are talking about something like this documentation on thread-pools: Most of the executor implementations in java.util.concurrent use thread pools, which consist of worker threads. This kind of thread exists separately from the Runnable and Callable tasks it executes and is often used to execute multiple tasks. Worker threads are normal ...


7

I don't think Akka and Reactor are Apples to Apples. Reactor is purposely minimal, with only a couple external dependencies. It gives you a basic set of tools in which to write event-driven applications but it by design does not enforce a particular model. It would actually not take that long to implement a Dynamo system using Reactor components. Everything ...


6

You can use the RegexSelector [1] to do that: commandReactor.notify("CREATE_(.+)", Event.wrap(obj)); or, using the annotations: @Selector(value = "CREATE_(.+)", type = SelectorType.REGEX) Then in your handler, you can inspect the capture group by looking at the header for group1 to groupN: new Consumer<Event<Object>>>() { ...


6

What matters is what ELSE your node process needs to do while the synchronous IO happens. In the case of a simple shell script that is run at the command line by a single user, synchronous IO is totally fine since if you were doing asychronous IO all you'd be doing is waiting for the IO to come back anyway. However, in a network service with multiple users ...


6

This is intentional to avoid (semi-)preemption, since Twisted is a cooperative multitasking system. Ctrl-C is handled in Python with a SIGINT handler installed by the interpreter at startup. The handler sets a flag when it is invoked. After each byte code is executed, the interpreter checks the flag. If it is set, KeyboardInterrupt is raised at that ...


6

Here's another way to organize your code, exploiting the single-threaded nature of Twisted: queue up all the urls you want to process, kick off the reactor, and decrement a counter when each request completes. When the counter reaches zero, stop the reactor which will return the results: from twisted.web.client import getPage from twisted.internet import ...


6

Because these tracebacks are written using a call to twisted.python.log.deferr() (in Twisted 10.2 anyway), it is possible to redirect them using a log observer. This is the most common thing to do with these stack traces. I can't find any base class for log observers (surprisingly) but there are a couple built in: twisted.python.log.PythonLoggingObserver ...


5

Visual Studio usually rebuilds the entire project when making a setup. Hence your protected exe (that you generated .NET Reactor) will be overwritten by Visual Studio. You should add a Post-build event (which is found in Visual studio Project properties) which calls .NET reactor to protect the DLL directly after it has been built. Do note that the event ...


5

A more straightforward solution, which doesn't require you to manage a counter: from twisted.internet import reactor, defer from twisted.web.client import getPage def printPage(page): print page def printError(err): print err urls = ['http://www.google.com', 'http://www.example.com'] jobs = [] for url in urls: ...


5

I got this working dandy. The fired SIGINT sets a flag running for any running task in my code, and additionally calls reactor.callFromThread(reactor.stop) to stop any twisted running code: #!/usr/bin/env python import sys import twisted import re from twisted.internet import reactor, defer, task import signal def one(result, token): print "Start ...


5

Using setTimeout with a very small timeout (0 or very nearly zero if you're feeling paranoid) is the only way to do this in a browser context. It works very well and is very reliable, but be sure to yield often enough but not too often, as it does take a while to come back to you ("a while" in a computer sense, of course; it's almost instantaneous [modulo ...


5

You're using waaaaay too much "reactor calls" (for example, there's a good chance that agent.request calls into the reactor) from the main thread. I'm not sure if that's your problem, but it's still not supported -- the only reactor calls to make from the non-reactor thread is reactor.callFromThread. Also, the whole architecture seems strange. Why are you ...


5

While asking this question, I was refining the code and it eventually worked (some great rubber ducking there). I thought rather than deleting my question I would post it in case anyone else runs into the same problem. The problem with the above code is the randomEventRouting() call while setting up the reactor, when setting this flag it randomly selects ...


5

No, I don't think you need multiple reactors. What you need, is a multi-service multi-protocol application. This is where Twisted really shines. So your application should start a web service, IRC Bot service and WebSocket server. Use twisted application service framework, specially starting a multi service ...


4

i have wrote a class ServerConnector that copied from SocketConnector, but do not call the connect for socket, because the socket was connected already, if a reactor was started with a ServiceHandler for notifications in the run() function of TcpServerConnection, the class TcpServer would start a new thread. so, i got multithread of reactor-partten, but i do ...


4

This is about as classic a use case for reactive libraries as you might find! :) The key part of "reactive" architectures is that they can respond to events rather than wait for results. RxJava facilitates this via Observable and Reactor does this via several different mechanisms. In Reactor, you can use a plain Reactor and set a replyTo on the Event, you ...


4

The problem you're having here is that web's IResource is a very old interface, predating even Deferred. The quick solution to your problem is to use Klein, which provides a nice convenient high-level wrapper around twisted.web for writing web applications, among other things, adding lots of handling for Deferreds throughout the API. The slightly more ...


3

Twisted, tornado and pulsar all use an event loop (called reactor in twisted) to wait for events on file descriptors. In this respect, they are similar libraries and therefore can interoperate with each other. The actor model in pulsar refers to the parallel side of the asynchronous framework. This is where pulsar differs from twisted for example. In pulsar ...


3

In a twisted application you can install more than one protocol-factory-client instance Twisted will handle connection for all application. So you can instanciate as server/client as you want and , you're right , reactor.run() must be launch only one time. So you can import your protocole and thant run the reactor loop . exemple based on the simpliest ...


3

Don't use time.sleep(20) in any Twisted-based code. This violates basic assumptions that any other Twisted-based code that you might be using makes. Instead, if want to delay something by N seconds, use reactor.callLater(N, someFunction). Once you remove the sleep calls from your program, the problem of unrelated timeouts being hit just because you've ...


3

Traveling: patterns such as Itinerary, Forwarding, and Ticket encapsulate mobility mgmt of an agent for one or more destinations. Task: patterns such as Master-Slave and Plan are concerned with the break-down of task and how these tasks are delegated to one or more agents Interaction: patterns such as Meeting, Locker, Messenger, Facilitator, and Organized ...



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