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Reaching into a thread at random and tinkering with its data is generally not a good idea. You'd want to write your reactor in such a way that it's listening for external messages. Depending on your performance needs, this could be as simple as external pause/resume messages where the reactor stops processing other inputs when it receives the pause message.


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But it seems that it's now impossible to block the main program, I'm not a Python guy but have done this in the context of Boost. Asio. You're correct—your callbacks need to execute quickly and return control to the main reactor. The idea is to only use asynchronous calls in your callbacks. For example, you wouldn't use an API for sending an IP datagram ...


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There are multiple choices here, but they boil down to two major kinds: cooperative (event loop/reactor/coroutine/explicit greenlet), or preemptive (implicit greenlet/thread/multiprocess). The first requires a lot more restructuring of your collectors. It can be a nice way to make the nondeterminism explicit, or to achieve massive concurrency, but neither ...


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I'd look at the possibility of adapting your case to socket-based client-server architecture where Controller would instantiate required number of Collectors each listening on its own port and handling received data in more elegant way through handle() method of the server. The fact that data comes from various I/O sources speaks even more for this solution ...


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When I try to compile this (g++ --std=c++11 reactor.cpp -pthread) I get a somewhat cryptic /usr/include/c++/4.9/functional:1665:61: error: no type named ‘type’ in ‘class std::result_of<void (*(int, InstructionsStore))(const int&, InstructionsStore&)>’ This appears to be the result of trying to pass stack references to the thread constructor. ...


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It sounds like you might want to look at Reactor's PersistentQueue facility and separate your Publisher from your Subscriber across that. It's a normal Queue implementation but it uses the Chronicle Queue for persistence, fail-over, and replayability. It is also extremely, extremely fast. You would basically have publisher pushing data into the ...


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I dealt with a similar issue using a custom container class. It uses double-buffering methodology via a CAS object that allows you to read all accumulated objects in one lock-free action. I have no idea how efficient it is but it's simplicity should ensure it is up there with the good ones. Note that most of the code below is test code - you can remove all ...


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What are the pros and cons of this, compared to asynchronously looping through each source as they appear, i.e. launching a separate thread for each source. What you're describing is basically what happens in a multithreaded program that uses blocking I/O APIs. In this case, the "reactor" moves into the kernel and the "asynchronous looping" is the ...


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reactor.run() is a blocking call. You will need to do something like, run your loop in a separate thread. The way you have it, your loop will run, but only if you manage to stop the reactor via some external event or signal. At that time, the call to reactor.run() will return, and the remainder of your code will execute. I am actually looking for a way ...


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First of all thank you for the feedback and the attention to our work. We are trying to follow with the real world tendencies and go ahead to be always in time ;-). Well, regarding Reactor or similar Reactive Streams solution. I'm note sure that it would be good idea to do your "scratch" flow. Even as long as Spring Integration looks like Reactive Streams, ...


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There isn't a single document that lists the pros and cons of RxJava versus Reactor. We don't see it being a mutually exclusive relationship. If you need the holistic Reactive approach of RxJava Observables, then use that and maybe add Reactor as a Scheduler implementation to get the high speed dispatching. If you're more interested in the functional, ...



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