Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

In Scheme, most of the time you'll probably want to use the default "current" ports for input and output. On most Unix systems, the default current input port is linked to stdin and the default current output port is linked to stdout. With that in mind, reading in two numbers and writing out their product is basically: (display (* (read) (read))) Now, if ...


3

Well what you want to do is serialization. Say you have such structure: struct PointFull { int lat; int lon; }; and also PointFull item1, item2; The way you serialize it to buffer is: unsigned char arr[20] = {0}; memcpy(arr, &item1.lat, sizeof(int)); memcpy(&arr[1 * sizeof(int)], &item1.lon, sizeof(int)); memcpy(&arr[2 * ...


3

With "unformatted" input (by which I now mean formatted (i.e. text) fortran input which doesn't follow a specific fixed format; not to be confused with actual unformatted input [NB]) your best option is probably to read in the hexa values as strings, then perform a fixed-format (rather than list-directed) read on the strings: program ReadSomeHex implicit ...


2

You can do something like var filePath = path.join(__dirname, '../your path to application folder'); fs.readdir(filePath, function (err, files) { if (err) { return console.error(err); } files.forEach(function (file) { if (file.indexOf('user') === 0) { var relFilePath = filePath + '/' + file + '/manifest.txt'; ...


1

What I imagine is happening is that you are on a Windows system, and the python script's open command is automatically making newlines ends with \r\n and the C# reader does not expect them. One way to fix this is to write to the file as binary instead of as text: def put(data, filename): with open(filename, 'wb') as outfile: ...


1

You can use fwrite and fread to write data into file and read from file. Below is sample code for same. #include <stdio.h> struct PointFull { int number; char text[10]; double real_number; }; int main() { struct PointFull data = {1, "Hello!", 3.14159}, read_data; FILE *fout = fopen("file_path", "w"); fwrite(&data, ...


1

You'd rather allocate a buffer of size sizeof(PointFull). Because if size of struct would ever be changed and become bigger than your hardcoded size, then you going to get a bug. Use a local buffer unless you really need to use a dynamic memory. I assume that in your code you don't really need an allocation. It's just that you may easily forget to ...


1

Since you have tagged C++ #include <iostream> #include <fstream> using namespace std; struct PointFull { double lat; double lon; PointFull(double lat_in = 0, double lon_in = 0) : lat(lat_in), lon(lon_in) {} }; int main() { PointFull item(123123, 123123); cout << "Writing to disk" << endl; ...


1

You must add [FieldQuoted] to make the library auto remove them http://www.filehelpers.net/docs/html/T_FileHelpers_FieldQuotedAttribute.htm [DelimitedRecord(",")] public class Records { [FieldQuoted] public string Name; [FieldQuoted] public string Track; [FieldQuoted] public string worldPrice; }


1

A CSV parser is now a part of .NET Framework. Add a reference to Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll (works fine in C#, don't mind the name) TextFieldParser parser = new TextFieldParser(@"c:\temp\test.csv"); parser.TextFieldType = FieldType.Delimited; parser.SetDelimiters(","); while (!parser.EndOfData) { //Process row string[] fields = parser.ReadFields(); ...


1

This is happening because you are reading the file as a flat string. The file contains quotes and therefore they are also getting read in. This is standard CSV format. The slash is used as an escape character in C#. So \" is really just ". You need to either replace the quotes with empty, trim the quotes, or use a CSV library to properly read in the file. ...


1

go = False start = "First string" end = "Last String" with open('path/to/file') as infile: for line in infile: line = line.strip() if line == start: go = True elif line == end: go = False continue if go: print(line) Instead of matching the whole line, if you were simply looking for a keyword: go ...


1

After @deceze pointed out that I should inspect the files in a hex editor, I discovered that a line feed character was prepended to the output. This was caused by a newline after the closing ?> tag of a PHP file I recently added. Removing the newline (or the ?> tag) fixed the issue. Thanks for all your help!



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible