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12

I initially thought this was not possible but after seeing Brian's comment, I searched CPAN and lo and behold, there is Win32::Process::Memory: C:\> ppm install Win32::Process::Info C:\> ppm install Win32::Process::Memory The module apparently uses the ReadProcessMemory function: Here is one of my attempts: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; ...


8

Yes. You can enumerate threads with Toolhelp functions; get the context with GetThreadContext(); and read the stack memory (i.e. using ESP from the context) with ReadProcessMemory(). The stack grows downwards in memory, so reading memory locations after ESP is going down the stack.


7

It is possible to do so if you have attached your program as a debugger to the process, which should be possible in those languages if wrappers around the appropriate APIs exist, or by directly accessing the windows functions through something like ctypes (for python). However, it may be easier to do in a more low-level language, since in higher level ones ...


6

Well, the fun part is getting access to the other process's memory. CheatEngine does it by running your entire OS under a virtual machine that allows memory protection to be defeated. There's also the 'running under a debugger' model, generally meaning start the target application as a child process of the modifying application, with elevated privileges. ...


5

#pragma comment( lib, "psapi" ) DWORD GetModuleBase(HANDLE hProc, string &sModuleName) { HMODULE *hModules; char szBuf[50]; DWORD cModules; DWORD dwBase = -1; //------ EnumProcessModules(hProc, hModules, 0, &cModules); hModules = new HMODULE[cModules/sizeof(HMODULE)]; if(EnumProcessModules(hProc, hModules, ...


4

Shouldn't it be ReadProcessMemory(piProcessInfo.hProcess, (void *)address, buffer, length, &bytesRead); ? If you give buffer-pointer address as input parameter, then ReadProcessMemory copies it where buffer pointer lies (not to the buffer but into buffer pointer vatiable and beyond) - and sice it is on the stack, stack gets corrupted.


4

There are ways to do do this using Process injection, delay load library etc. I don't see you doing it from the tools you have listed. This is C and assembler country and beginning to get you into virus writing territory. Once you get it to work, any anti-virus packages will veto it running and try and isolate it. So you better really want to do this. ...


4

At least in my opinion, if you have an LPMODULEENTRY involved, you're probably starting in the wrong direction. I'd walk through the blocks of memory in the target process with VirtualQueryEx instead. This will give you a MEMORY_BASIC_INFORMATION about each block in that process. You can then use ReadProcessMemory and scan through the blocks to find what ...


4

You probably want a hex constant, that is to say 0x7845CDDC. ReadProcessMemory(hProc,(LPCVOID)(0x7845CDDC),&PHP,4,NULL);


4

Your offset must be added to the pointer read at the location wow64cpu.dll + 4720, so if your addresses are correct, the location of your float is located at [wow64cpu.dll + 4720] + 30. Your code would be // Set the addresses to read var pointer = dllPtr.ToInt32() + 0x4720; var offset = 34; // Initialize the buffers var buffer = new byte[4]; // Find the ...


4

A page that has PAGE_GUARD protection is guaranteed to not be accessible. Any access to it generates a page fault, reflected back into the process that owns the page as a STATUS_GUARD_PAGE_VIOLATION exception. This feature is used heavily in Windows to detect and recover from the condition this site is named for. The last two pages of the stack of a ...


3

Neither the language C, nor C++ defines the term "memory". Things are defined in abstract terms like "storage" and "storage classifiers". Pointers are abstract things -- their values can be anything, totally unrelated to the physical or virtual addresses. Only in the context of a system and its implementation are terms like memory and address space ...


3

First, your method signature is wrong, Single=Float while the original parameter is of the LPBUF type. Use this method signature: <DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError=true)> _ Public Shared Function ReadProcessMemory( _ ByVal hProcess As IntPtr, _ ByVal lpBaseAddress As IntPtr, _ <Out()>ByVal lpBuffer() As Byte, _ ByVal dwSize as Integer, _ ...


3

Quoting from MSDN on Win32 error codes: ERROR_PARTIAL_COPY 299 (0x12B) Only part of a ReadProcessMemory or WriteProcessMemory request was completed. My guess is the address you specified contained some valid data, but somewhere between that address and (address + length of copy), there was no memory mapped. See wikipedia on page table or virtual memory ...


3

Marshal.Copy() is not a substitute for Read/WriteProcessMemory(). It cannot reach into the address space of a process and access memory owned by that process. The strongest hint that this is so is that it doesn't have an overload that takes a process handle. Keep in mind that every process in Windows has its own virtual memory address space. Pointers in ...


3

ReadProcessMemory and WriteProcessMemory are native Win32 APIs that allow you to read and write from and to the memory of a different processes. You only ever need to use those APIs when trying to read and write memory in a different process. As you may imagine, they are not often used in routine development. Marshal.Copy is used to copy between managed and ...


3

A little bit of debugging and somethings interesting is identified: all pages that fail have protection bit PAGE_GUARD set (see MSDN doc). As I interpret the docs, it is by design that you cannot read these pages with ReadProcessMemory. if(ReadProcessMemory(hProc, baseOffs,buf,si.dwPageSize,&numByteWritten) == FALSE) { assert(mbi.Protect & ...


3

Check the community comment to the MSDN ReadProcessMemory page, quote(sic): W7 wont run read process memory You may need to check your access permissions for "SE_DEBUG_NAME" for the current processes token. If not enabled. Enabled it. This must be done as administrator of course. Also fully declare the return types and use the use_last_error ...


3

ReadProcessMemory is a function that is known to work correctly. It allows one process to read memory from another process. But the addresses it uses are still virtual memory addresses. They are relative to the virtual address space of the target process. I suspect that what you are actually trying to do is read physical memory. In which case there is no ...


2

Here's the JNA project, which lets you call any function exposed in a DLL, without writing any JNI code.


2

The '\0' at the end of your string is likely not being copied, either out of your buffer when you write, or into your buffer when you read. As a result, printf() is just going to print from the beginning of your string until it sees a '\0', which may be after a number of garbage characters.


2

From an external process, you pretty much have the correct approach. However, if you're looking for a string you probably don't care about certain regions (eg. executable memory) so you can exclude them from your search region. Most likely you are really only interested in PAGE_READONLY and PAGE_READWRITE. You should read the memory in as big blocks as ...


2

Obviously, you can't do anything "without further knowledge". But we already know a whole lot from the fact that it's Windows. For starters, we know that the executable gets its own view of memory, and in that virtual view the executable is loaded at its preferred starting address (as stated in the PE header of the EXE). The start at 0x00010000 is a ...


2

The return address is at EBP + 4 in your current stack frame. Whenever a new function is called a new stack frame is set up, and the old ESP (stack pointer) is moved to EBP (base pointer). Local variables are created on the stack by subtracting the new stack pointer. Passed arguments are pushed in reverse order prior to calling. From the base pointer you ...


2

buffer[0] | (buffer[1] << 8) | (buffer[2] << 16) | (buffer[3] << 24) or the other way around, depending on whether your high-order byte is buffer[0] or buffer[3]


2

The best way (IMO) is the following: GCHandle pinned = GCHandle.Alloc(array , GCHandleType.Pinned); IntPtr address = pinned.AddrOfPinnedObject(); reader.ReadProcessMemory(address, (uint)255, out bytesReadSize); pinned.Free();


2

Check this link: Access Physical Memory, Port and PCI Configuration Space But start from Windows Vista, even WinHex cannot open the physical ram.


2

You are encountering dynamic memory allocation. In the CheatEngine world, these are called 'pointers'. Consider some data (for example a uint32_t/DWORD) inside memory which was malloc'd. If you find the address of the data, there is no guarantee that the next time you launch the process, the address will be the same. This is because the memory returned by ...


2

0x40000 is just another name for the integer 262144. It's not a string with "0x" in it, it's an alternative syntax for writing integers, for use when base 16 is more enlightening than base 10. In particular, the following cannot be true: the "Trainer.ReadPointerInteger" function requires the baseaddress parameter in the form "0x40000". It's just that ...


2

You may want to consider what you are doing. ReadProcessMemory is a debug function designed for debuggers which requires SeDebugPrivilege, so I hope you are writing a debugger. Ignoring the queasiness I get from considering use of these functions in a non-debug capacity, you are leaking the buffer you allocated and requiring that your application run as ...



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