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11

Have you tried int 21h service 2? DL is the character to print. mov dl,'A' ; print 'A' mov ah,2 int 21h To print the integer value, you'll have to write a loop to decompose the integer to individual characters. If you're okay with printing the value in hex, this is pretty trivial. If you can't rely on DOS services, you might also be able to use the ...


10

When Intel was building the 8086, there was a valid case for having more than 64KB in a machine, but there was no way it'd ever use a 32-bit address space. Back then, even a megabyte was a whole lot of memory. (Remember the infamous quote "640K ought to be enough for anybody"? It's essentially a mistranslation of the fact that back then, 1MB was freaking ...


7

So you have a stand-alone (you said "pre-boot") program, like a bootloader, running in real mode? And this is on a PeeCee with the usual BIOS? In that case you have only one CPU running. In order to spin-up the other CPU units an operating system will typically execute what is called the universal startup algorithm which goes like this: BSP sends AP an ...


6

Under x86 Real-Mode Memory the physical address is 20 bit long and is calcolated: PhysicalAddress = Segment * 16 + Offset Check also: Real-Mode Memory Management


6

In real mode, you have 256 different SOFTWARE TRIGGERED interrupts. In the early days of BIOS and DOS, they were used as not much more than a "jump address" table. For example, DOS used INT 21 mainly, so applications could be coded to use the INT 21 processor instruction instead of a CALL 1234:5678 - the real address would change with each new version of ...


5

These addresses were cast in stone 30 years ago when IBM released the first IBM PC. 0x3f0 is the first address for the primary floppy disk controller registers. A list of addresses is available here. One uncharacteristic move by the IBM design team was that they put the machine together from standard off-the-shelf parts. Most chips came from Intel, the ...


4

Check out the FreeDOS project. They have developer tools that include compilers, assemblers, and linkers. You'll probably have to modify the standard library, though, so that it uses BIOS calls rather than int 21h.


4

As far as I understand, real mode does not affect the commands you can run on the CPU, but it affects how the CPU memory reference commands are interpreted. So, yes, you can use eax, but you won't be able to get the [eax] memory cell. See relevant part in Intel's Manual.


4

BIOSes use PIT interrupt (IRQ0) to track time. As soon as you enter protected mode, real mode interrupt handling is no longer valid; CPU in protected mode requires protected mode IDT (Interrupt Descriptor Table). Upon entering protected mode, IDT limit in IDTR (IDT Register) is set to 0 (any interrupt number makes CPU generate an exception), so as soon as ...


3

If you use qemu you need to pad your image to a integer multiple of the size of a sector. Add this at the end of image.asm: times 512*2-($-$$) db 0 And assemble and run with: nasm -f bin -o image.bin image.asm qemu-system-i386 -fda image.bin With another emulator you might have to pad to a total length of (1+5)*512 or even to the full length of a ...


3

According to the Intel manual, you get an "undefined opcode" exception: mov — Move { Protected Mode, Real-Address Mode, Virtual-8086 Mode, 64-Bit Mode} Excpetions #UD If attempt is made to load the CS register.


3

You mean the processor is in real mode defaulting to 16-bit code. There is a prefix (66h) which switches between 16 and 32-bit mode for the next insn. So, in 16-bit mode (which can happen in protected mode if running in a 16-bit code segment) it allows you to use 32-bit registers, and in 32-bit mode it allows you to use 16-bit registers.


3

The Bus Interface Unit consists of segment registers, adder to generate 20 bit address and instruction prefetch queue. Once this address is sent out of BIU, the instruction and data bytes are fetched from memory and they fill a First In First Out 6 byte queue. See a document called "8086_Internal_Block_diagram_enotes.pdf", easily to be found via Google. ...


3

First, I recommend you check out the OSDev Wiki, which has resources upon resources for developing your own OS and components. Second, have you considered writing a bootloader in assembly that starts off in real mode, switches to protected mode, and then jumps to your (32-bit) compiled kernel?


3

Firstly, welcome to the world of realmode assembler! You've probably already realised that the actual assembler is much the same between realmode and protected mode - the primary differences being operand sizes and memory layout/management. There are some resources for realmode out there on the internet - you've just got to hunt them down! One very ...


3

One reasonable starting point would probably be the library documentation at OpenWatcom.


3

Linux does not normally support this, particularly since it reinitializes hardware in a way that the BIOS and DOS programs may not expect. However, there is some infrastructure to switch back to real mode in specific cases - particularly, for a reboot (see machine_real_restart in arch/x86/kernel/reboot.c) - and has code to reinitialize hardware for kexec or ...


2

i haven't tried this so I don't know if it would work, but here goes: There is an option in the header of a bzImage format kernel file that specifies the address of real mode code to execute before the protected mode code starts. You could create a minimal bzImage-compliant file which has no actual kernel, but which has real mode code to load your MBR ...


2

You can find a list here, for x86.


2

PRINT_SUM PROC NEAR CMP AL, 0 JNE PRINT_AX PUSH AX MOV AL, '0' MOV AH, 0EH INT 10H POP AX RET PRINT_AX: PUSHA MOV AH, 0 CMP AX, 0 JE PN_DONE MOV DL, 10 DIV DL CALL PRINT_AX MOV AL, AH ADD AL, 30H MOV AH, 0EH INT 10H PN_DONE: POPA RET PRINT_SUM ENDP


2

You can try using Borland's Turbo C inside DosBox or something like that. That way you can actually run whatever you compile. I've run some antique 16 bit DOS code under it and it works flawlessly.


2

You need to target one (or several) of OHCI, EHCI or xHCI. OHCI specification EHCI specification xHCI specification OSDev.org has an overview of what it takes to support USB. I don't know if it is even feasible in real mode but it is a significant undertaking in any case. Why can't you use a protected-mode RTOS ?


2

I also find out the answer in this website: http://forum.nasm.us/index.php?topic=991.0. This is exactly what ninjalj said but in more detailed.


2

1: You should only need a small amount of assembly to handle the boot process and load the C code. Shouldn't be more than like 20-30 lines I think. 2-4: I haven't really used C++ with OS dev, but I think I remember reading that it takes more work to get it running somewhere. Sorry I can't be of more help. 5: You "can" do it using MinGW, but from my ...


2

The simple answer is thatint 13hwill not complete successfully without the hard drive hardware interrupt IRQ 5 -int 0Dhwhich will not occur until the PIC is acknowleged at the end of keyboard hardware interrupt IRQ 1 -int 9h. The happy answer is that it is much simpler to use int 16h ah=0 to wait for a keypress.


2

In real mode, the segment register is used to provide a 20-bit address. In this case, the data segment register ds provides the 'high' 16 bits of the address: (0x1234 << 4 = 0x12340), and the offset in the segment is given by: 0x5678, to yield: 0x179b8. The data segment register is implicit, so it's not necessary to use: ds:(%bx). If you were using ...


2

You can use 80x25 mode and load an 8x8 font (ax = 1112h), that will result in 80x50 characters. As far as I can remember, that was pretty standard.


2

The boot sector of the disk contains not ASCII data, but code. With high probability, one of the first bytes will be NULL and remaining possibly not printable codes (such as CR, LF, etc.). Trying to print the buffer by INT 10h, which prints ascii codes, and ending on 0 will result probably with nothing displayed at all. You should convert every byte of ...


2

If the above is a single assembler file, change jmp 1000h:0000 to jmp 0FE0h:200h, this will appropriately compensate for the ip register offset accumulated from all the way from [ORG 0] and still transfer control to physical address 0x10000. In addition to that, set ds to cs (or to 0FE0h) in the second part of the code.



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