Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

In your program you pass into your program two pointers related to the memory you allocated. One is the address of your buffer pointer which you allocated. The other is a pointer into the buffer called freeCh. In your recursive function, you latter reallocate onto *buffer. However, a reallocation may return a pointer different from the one that was ...


3

When you free memory, what happens to pointers that point into that memory? Do they become invalid immediately? Yes, definitely. From section 6.2.4 of the C standard: The lifetime of an object is the portion of program execution during which storage is guaranteed to be reserved for it. An object exists, has a constant address, and retains its ...


3

The way realloc works is that it guarantees that a[0]..a[74] will have the same values after the realloc as they did before it. However, the moment you try to access a[75] after the realloc, you have undefined behaviour. This means that the program is free to behave in any way it pleases, including segfaulting, printing out the original values, printing out ...


3

Your realloc() is not allocating enough memory to hold the data you are copying into the buffer. Use this instead: externalCommand = (char *)realloc(externalCommand, sizeof(char) * (textLength + 1 + strlen(argv[i]) + 1)); That being said, if you precalculate the buffer size, you can get rid of realloc() and use a single malloc(): char *externalCommand = ...


2

realloc() changes the size of the memory block pointed to by ptr to size bytes passed as input you are missing allocation for argv[i] you are supposed to be giving total size that is needed as argument to realloc in realloc you need to give size as textLength + strlen(argv[i]) + 2


2

As it says in the documentation for realloc() and explained further in this SO answer, The function may move the memory block to a new location Which means that it could return the same pointer if the memory manager can allocate the requested size at the same point in memory. For (2), what exactly do you mean "Is it really allocating 20MB?" If you ...


2

I modified your program a bit to help figure out what's going wrong: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> #include <errno.h> int main(void) { unsigned int strLength = 32; char *stringPtr = malloc(strLength); if (!stringPtr) { fprintf(stderr, "failed to allocate %u bytes: %s\n", ...


2

The comment from @WhozCraig points out the problem. Here's a suggested fix. Return the realloced buffer from recPrint. Use free on the returned value of recPrint. char* recPrint(FILE *file, char *buffer, int realBufferSize, int bufferSize, char *freeCh, NodePtr* temp){ .... // where you recurse... buffer = recPrint(file, ...


1

1) I dont understand why in the output some of the address are the same (2-4) (5-10) & (11-20) ?Shouldn't each one of them be different. As others already stated, realloc doesn't necessarily have to move the existing memory chunk, but may just extend it. 2) Is my program really consuming 20MB of memory? I did run it through Valgrind and it says ...


1

Actually it looks ok if the addresses are repeating. What it actually does is: Ok, I have a pointer, which needs to be resized to X. How much memory is left directly after this pointer? It is Y. If Y is greater than X then I don't really have to move my memory, I'll just assign the yet unused space to my pointer. If Y is lower than X, then it won't fit ...


1

int MyFunction(people **record);// MyFunction(&record);//call at main ... struct people *tmp = realloc(*record, 20 * sizeof (people)); if (tmp) { *record = tmp; }


1

Your first call malloc with a size S and then realloc with the same size S. This is wrong: you have to pass to realloc the new wanted size (independently of the current size - it is not an increment). Here, there is a big chance realloc returns exactly the same pointer it received. BTW it is not clear why you want to do with a malloc immediately followed by ...


1

Some problems that are with your current code (ignoring the dynamic size need as opposed to fixed since you already said you are using that to debug), printf("%s\n",*word_regular[i]); %s takes a char * for printing, so it should be printf("%s\n",word_regular[i]); For the second printf, since norm_word itself is a char array, you should simply use ...


1

Code is C++ with passing args by reference and using new. To make C, lots of little fixes including how C "reference" variable are passed (explicitly by address). You are not doing rellloc() correctly should the allocation fail as you have lost the original pointer. Always good form to NULL a pointer after freeing it. #include <stdio.h> #include ...


1

But how does it still work fine even though i remove the realloc() statement from the snippet? If you remove realloc(), maybe the code works fine but that is an accident. The code is still wrong, it has a buffer overrun, and the result is "undefined behavior" -- which means that it might work fine, it might crash, it might give the wrong answer, it ...


1

In the if statements you declare a new local variable courses that hides the global variable of the same name: courses **course=(courses **)malloc(....); The print in the end uses the global variable, but that is still NULL. You instead want to set the existing global variable: course=(courses **)malloc(....);



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible