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19

OK, this is going to be a little tricky. In Rebol 3 there are no such things as system words, there are just words. Some words have been added to the runtime library lib, and set is one of those words, which happens to have a function assigned to it. Modules import words from lib, though what "import" means depends on the module options. That might be more ...


18

Rebol actually does not have scoping at all. Let's take this code: rebol [] a: 1 func-1: func [] [a] inner: context [ a: 2 func-2: func [] [a] func-3: func [/local a] [a: 3 func-1] ] So, with that code loaded, if Rebol had lexical scoping, this is what you'd see: >> reduce [func-1 inner/func-2 inner/func-3] == [1 2 1] That would ...


16

There isn't really a summary somewhere, so let's go over the basics, perhaps a little more informally than Bindology. Let Ladislav write a new version of his treatise for R3 and Red. We'll just go over the basic differences, in order of importance. Object and Function Contexts Here's the big difference. In R2, there were basically two kinds of contexts: ...


14

Here there be dragons! The reword function is a bit of an experiment to add shell-style string interpolation to Rebol in a way that works with the way we do things. Unlike a lot of Rebol's series functions, it really is optimized for working on just string types, and the design reflects that. The current version is a design prototype, meant to eventually be ...


10

At the time of this writing (2013-01), Rebol 3 still lacks the few CGI-supporting functions which were bundled with Rebol 2. However, if you are fine with hacking up the missing CGI support yourself, you can still get going right away. Before we start, you need to store the R3 binary on the machine you want to run your CGI, and you need to know the full ...


9

That's a bug in Rebol v2.x with the network protocols. It is a valid URL! type. Normally, you could do a trick like this: >> type? http://user:pass@myserver/test%21file.txt == url! See, it's a valid URL! >> read http://user:pass@rtibackup/test%21file.txt ** User Error: URL error: http://user:pass@rtibackup/test!file.txt ** Near: read ...


9

Ah, that's a good example of why R3 tones down the way errors get triggered. In R2, when an ERROR! values is evaluated (processed by the interpreter) it will activate the error handling mechanism. So, if you're not really careful, as you pass around the error value (like passing it to a function, returning it as a result, or in your case, evaluating it ...


8

The construct you would be looking for would be CASE. It takes a series of conditions and code blocks to evaluate, evaluating the blocks only if the condition is true and stopping after the first true condition is met. theVar: 60 case [ theVar > 60 [ print "Greater than 60!" ] theVar == 3 [ print "It's 3!" ] theVar ...


7

You can achieve the same by using the existing object as a prototype to create a new object. >> foo: make object! [bar: 3] >> foo: make foo [baz: 3] >> probe foo make object! [ bar: 3 baz: 3 ]


7

Your question of "are there limits" is slippery. I'll try and give you "the answer" instead of just "yeah, sure"...which would be more expedient albeit not too educational. :) Consider the following snippet. It captures the parser position into x, and then runs what's in parentheses in the DO dialect. That code re-sets x to the tail of the input if the ...


7

In rebol, struct! is a data type used to approximate struct in the C languages. It also is used in argument specification. A good description of what it is and how to use it is at: http://www.rebol.com/docs/library.html#struct


7

Here's a few ways: x: :print ;; assign 'x to 'print x "hello world" ;; and execute it hello world blk: copy [] ;; create a block append blk :print ;; put 'print in it do [blk/1 "hello world"] ;; execute first entry in the block (which is 'print) hello world x: 'print ;; assign 'x to the value 'print ...


7

The behaviour of this argument passing type has been changed on purpose. (Many users including myself requested the change). The advantage is that you can request evaluation for this argument type using parentheses (another way how to request evaluation is to use get-word). If you want truly unevaluated argument passing, see this: quote: make function! [[ ...


7

The short answer is because it is generally unnecessary to evaluate a block at the call point, because blocks in Rebol don't take parameters so it mostly doesn't matter where they are evaluated. However, that "mostly" may need some explanation... It comes down to two interesting features of Rebol: static binding, and how do of a function works. Static ...


7

First thing: you don't "allocate a variable" in Rebol, you "pre-allocate a series buffer" (which happens to be referenced by a word in your code example, but it could be just lying in a block). Quick anwser: each time you are INSERTing or APPENDing data to a series, if the series buffer is full, the series will be re-allocated by the memory manager to a ...


7

I've done very advanced Rebol parsers which manage live and mission-critical TCP servers, and doing proper error reporting was a requirement. So this is important! Probably one of the most unique aspects of Rebol's PARSE is that you can include direct evaluation within the rules. So you can set variables to track the parse position, or the error messages, ...


7

Here is a simple web server created by Andreas Bolka (@earl) https://github.com/earl/rebol3/blob/master/scripts/shttpd.r It is HTTP 1.0 and has no SSL or other fancy features, and amazingly it is only 64 lines of code hence is ideal for an embedded server.


7

Some tutorials on parse: 9.3 Parse (REBOL's Answer to Regular Expressions) Computer Programming Tutorial, by Nick Antonaccio a parse tutorial sort of. Dialecting from same guy: 9.21 Bindology, Dialects, Metaprogramming and Other Advanced Topics Followed by some examples that show a few examples


7

And a further option is to use all all [ expression1 expression2 expression3 ] and as long as each expression returns a true value, they will continue to be evaluated. so, if all [ .. ][ ... do this if all of the above evaluate to true. ... even if not all true, we got some work done :) ] and we also have any if any [ expression1 ...


6

When you redefine a word that's defined in system/words, you should redefine it exactly. The set word has two refinements: /pad and /any that your redefinition should also include: cloneset: :set set: func [ word [word! block!] value /any /pad ][ either all [word? word list? get word] [ throw make error! "List is immutable!" ...


6

the easy answer is no we can't... The way parse works, it may need to roll-back to a prior part of the input string, which might in fact be the head of the complete input, when it meets the last character of the stream. ports copy their data to a string buffer as they get their input from a port, so in fact, there is never any "prior" string for parse to ...


6

REBOL does not have a equivalent. An object in R3 is created using any other object as a prototype. But once, created, it is an independent entity. Changes to the object that was used as the prototype will not affect the newer object -- or vice versa. Objects in REBOL 2, once created, cannot have new fields added to them; all you can really do is create a ...


6

Oldes is right, the JS-like prototyping is not present in REBOL by default. But you are free to create own functionality that suits your needs. Here is simple example that uses nested context for value sharing between multiple instances to simulate the JS prototyping: creature: func [ /prototype field [word!] value [any-type!] /local ...


6

The challenge with profiling in REBOL (R2 & R3) is three-fold. timing, looping & Memory use. Timing: on some OSes the default timing is not precise (like windows). this can be largely alleviated by creating bigger loops which basically scale the test to acceptable timing margins. You can also create better timers, like the chrono lib I built for ...


6

You need to use append on the port, and not the url! port: open my-scheme://localhost append port "my data" The only port actors that can take a URL as an argument are those that have a port! specified as an argument. These are create, delete, open, close, read, write, open?, query, update, and rename. See ...


6

That's a pretty standard naming convention for Rebol exports, though they should be lowercase in the code of course. The all uppercase thing is just a naming convention when referring to functions in chat clients or web sites that can't show code like this. You generally don't uppercase any words in Rebol code unless they are used for something else. ...


6

In terms of R2. Yes, wrapping the whole lot in a context (using CONTEXT) is straight forward. You could also do this using USE: use [numbers][ numbers: none rule: [ thru 5 copy numbers to 10 to end ] parse [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ] [ rule ] ] And as Graham says, use the local variable of a function which will set NUMBERS to none by default. I ...


6

If this is still a problem, it's probably the URL parsing code that's an issue. Specific characters are special, but not that many, and especially not "!". There's a newer version of Rebol called R3. Check if it's still a problem there. If so, R3 is open source and can be fixed quickly.


6

This is a really good question, and something I've thought about for years. It turns out that Rebol's internal object storage mechanism can handle this, but there's no way of expressing it in source code. Why not you ask? Here's why: Rebol currently has the concept of name-value pairs. That's how contexts and objects are expressed. However, it is often ...



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