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9

In your else block, it should be return multiplyT(a, b, acc);


9

Since you have a recursive type in there, you need to declare it explicitly: data T a = L [a] | F (a -> T a) (+>) (F f) = f unL (L x) = x eat xs x = if x == "vomit" then L $ reverse xs else F $ eat (x:xs) eaten = unL $ eat [""] "x" +> "y" +> "z" +> "vomit" {- *Main> eaten ["","x","y","z"] -} Defining eaten1 = eat [""] "x" +> "y" ...


9

As this exercise is about the List Monad, try to not think of what you know about lists, but limit yourself to the structure of monads. So that would be move :: Monad m => Pos -> m Pos That is, move takes a Pos and gives you back something that is about Pos things in some monadic context m. (In the case of lists, the "context" being "arbitrary ...


8

You cannot do: return ((temp,xz) : gainData xc) The gainData function returns an IO [something] not just [something]. You have to first extract the value returned: res <- gainData xc return $ (temp,xz) : res The varname <- action does the following: It calls action, which in this case its gainData xc. This action returns an IO something It ...


7

No, there is no way to tell a compiler that tail recursion is required. Some compilers (none that I'm aware of) may support implementation-specific annotations, but that requires the user to use that specific compiler. Some other compilers, in some modes, intentionally never support tail calls, because they can provide a better debugging experience by not ...


6

There is no struct my_struct in your code, your struct is an anonymous typedef, you need it to be like this typedef struct my_struct { char *string; struct my_struct **children; int child_num; } my_struct; Or even typedef struct my_struct my_struct; struct my_struct { char *string; my_struct **children; int child_num; };


6

Your three points are pretty much spot-on. When the compiler won't allow you to pass &mut cache, it is because the value is actually already borrowed. The type of cache is &mut HashMap<i32, i32>, so passing &mut cache results in a value of type &mut &mut HashMap<i32, i32>. Just passing cache results in the expected type. The ...


5

Function application has higher precedence than many other operations, so foo 3 * x + 1 is actually calling foo 3, then multiplying that result by x and adding 1, which looks like where your infinite loop might be. Changing it to the following should fix that: | odd x = foo $ 3 * x + 1 | x `mod` 2 == 0 = foo $ x `div` 2


5

If they are just nested lists, e.g., [[[], []], [], [[]]], here's a nice solution: def depthCount(lst): return 1 + max(map(depthCount, lst), default=0) Here's a slight variation you could use if you don't use Python 3.4, where the default argument was introduced: def depthCount(lst): return len(lst) and 1 + max(map(depthCount, lst)) They also ...


5

Issues: concatenation operator in Oracle is ||, not +, level is reserved word, in Oracle there is not function replicate, in table definition you used parent, in code: parentID, not sure why you used cast ... as varchar(1000), here I replaced it with substr. Version of your recursive query working in Oracle: with categorytree (id, title, lvl, parent, ...


4

Using direct recursion: inNMoves :: KnightPos -> Int -> [KnightPos] inNMoves start 0 = return start inNMoves start n = do first <- moveKnight start inNMoves first (n - 1) But as mentioned in the comments: you can use built-in functions for this. For example: inNMoves start n = (foldl (>>=) . return) start (replicate n moveKnight) Or ...


4

The problem is that ask isn't a function, it's a recursive value. You need to take a parameter in order to make it a function: let rec ask () = printfn "%s" "Please enter a valid path or \"exit\"" let input = Console.ReadLine() match input with | "exit" -> Exit | ValidPath -> Path input | _ -> ask ()


4

You need save head->next first, and then call the func revserse recursively. Besides, you cannot judge head->next, it maybe null struct node* reverse(struct node *prev, struct node *head) { if(head == NULL) { /* To make the last node pointer as NULL and determine the head pointer */ return prev; } struct node * next = ...


4

You need to return from the else block as well. In your case even though the value of acc is updated that value is mot returned when b != 0 var multiplyT = function(a, b, acc) { if (b == 0) { console.log("BASE CASE: ", acc); return acc; } else { b--; acc = acc + a; console.log("NOT THE BASE CASE: ", a, b, acc); ...


4

Look at it this way: the reversed string will start with the last letter of the original, followed by all but the last letter, reversed. So: function reverseString(strToReverse) { if (strToReverse.length <= 1) return strToReverse; // last char + // 0 .. second-last-char, reversed return strToReverse[strToReverse.length - 1] + ...


3

See the solution by @MaxZoom below for a more concise version. Note that the tail-recursive style in my own answer provides no advantage over the plain-recursive version since JS interpreters are not required to perform tail call elimination. [Original] Here's a tail recursive version that works by removing a character from the front of the input string ...


3

To keep the stack from growing, you have to allow each coroutine to actually exit after it schedules the next recursive call, which means you have to avoid using yield from. Instead, you use asyncio.async (or asyncio.ensure_future if using Python 3.4.4+) to schedule the next coroutine with the event loop, and use Future.add_done_callback to schedule a ...


3

You can write the function simpler the following way Lint inserord( Lint li, int x ) { if ( ( li == NULL ) || !( li->value < x ) ) { Lint new_li = malloc( sizeof( Nodo ) ); new_li->value = x; new_li->next = li; return new_li; } li->next = inserord( li->next, x ); return li; } and ...


3

Based on the terminology you are using: The "recursive condition" is the set of circumstances in which the function will call itself recursively to reduce the problem domain. When this happens, a new function call is added to the stack and the call goes "deeper" The "stopping condition" is the set of circumstances where the function will provide an answer ...


3

Here is the thing about realloc: it has the freedom to change not just the size of the allocated memory block, but also its location. In general, realloc can break any pointers you have that are pointing to objects in the block of memory that was realloced. When you try to use those pointers later, you will get undefined behavior. You should either ...


3

The linked page explains how to solve the problem with a two-finger solution; it's a bit surprising that they don't simply write the recursive version, which would be simple and clear. (In my experience, you don't succeed at interviews by providing tricky and obscure code when there is a simple and clear version which is equally efficient. But I suppose ...


3

Note that concatMap moveKnight has type [Knight] -> [Knight] and will return the positions reachable from the input positions. Knowing that, you can use: iterate (concatMap moveKnight) to generate an infinite list of sets of positions where the next set of positions is obtained by making a knight move from a position in the previous set. For example: ...


3

Your algorithm works well. The only thing missing is to restore the '.' in pathExist() if the tested path is not successful : ... if(pathExists(maze, sr, sc + 1, er, ec, distance + 1)) return true; maze[sr][sc] = '.'; //<=========== add this to restore the maze state return false; } Without this line, your failed ...


2

Try this: with cte as( select * from t where id = 5 union all select t.id, t.name, t.pid from cte c join t on c.pid = t.id) select replace(stuff((select '-' + name from cte order by id for xml path('')), 1, 1, ''), '-', '->') Fiddle http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/6fdde1/19


2

You can leverage PCRE regex power of capturing groups in look-aheads and subroutines to get the nested {...} substrings. A regex demo is available here. $re = "#(?=(\{(?>[^{}]|(?1))*+\}))#"; $str = "Hello {#name}! I'm a {%string|sentence|bit of {#random} text}"; preg_match_all($re, $str, $matches, PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE); print_r($matches[1]); See ...


2

How does one develop an intuition to think about a solution to problems of this type? The solution is very clever and quite specific to the problem, but it is also an example of a more general problem-solving strategy called divide and conquer. Instead of attacking the problem in full, create smaller versions of it and try to solve them, eg. with pencil ...


2

In Haskell, the two-finger solution seems to be the obvious way. This version will go wrong in various ways if the requested element isn't present. I'll leave it as an exercise for you to fix that (hint: write versions of drop and last that return Maybe values, and then string the computations together with >>=). Note that this takes the last element ...


2

You are using the post-increment operator (i++), which returns the current value before incrementing the variable. In other words, you always call you function with the same i. Using the pre-incremenet (++i) instead should solve the issue: else (new Trainer(n)).workerTrain([data[i]], train(++i, trainingSet, l, y));


2

You seem to think that branchLen gets reduced when it really isn't. Calling tree(branchLen-15,t) only reduces branchLen for the recursive call, not in the current call. It's not like branchLen -= 15. So: main calls tree(75,t). tree(75,t) calls tree(60,t) and then tree(60,t) again (after rotating). Not tree(45,t). Each tree(60,t) calls tree(45,t) twice (so ...


2

This is a good one. Recursion can make your head spin. The reason it's undefined is because not all iterations return a value, and for those that don't you get undefined -- the same as if you set a variable to any function that doesn't return a value. It gets confusing with recursion though, because the return value you're seeing in this case is from ...



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