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6

Do not put srand(time(NULL)); in your aiPutSign function, you'll get the same random number at every call. Call srand once for example at the start of your program.


5

Let aside the fact that the entire implementation seems wrong, the direct reason for the runtime exception that you're experiencing is your recursive call to permute(2,array), which eventually leads to a stack overflow. This happens because you are calling it with n-- instead of --n (or more precisely, n-1).


4

Here is a 'dirty' but easy way to do it def lists(l): ''' Return the total number of lists in A (including A itself). Each element of A and any nested lists are either ints or other lists. ''' # convert the list to string and count the ['s # each [ is the start of a list, so the number of ['s equals # the number of lists ...


4

You put too much responsibilities into one method. You combine the floodfill algorithm with your island numbering algorithm. I've created this jdoodle. First of all you better create a single fill method, that does nothing more than filling islands with the value of a counter (I've made it static so you don't need to pass it through the algorithm, although ...


3

There are two ways you can dot it. Either you use reflection or you use a common sub interface. Anyway, ListItems and items should have the same name to provide some logic to the relation. public List<Item> ListItems { get; set; } public List<ItemList> ListItems { get; set; } Here is a way you can do it with a common interface public ...


3

If your string is so big that String.split() breaks on it, you have the following options: Try StringTokenizer, it's unlikely to be much better but it's worth a go. Update: I checked the source code of this and it looks pretty simple and memory-efficient, equivalent with option 3. Use a raw regex Matcher and build your list manually. Do all the parsing ...


3

A correct implementation with neither static variables nor globals (both are just plain evil, try to avoid them at any cost) that gives you the desired output can be something as simple as #include <iostream> long int d2b(int x) { return x ? (x%2 + 10*d2b(x/2)) : 0; } int main() { std::cout << "enter a number:" << std::endl; int ...


3

Don't use recursion: it won't be faster. Reversing a string is not a problem that requires recursion. Actually, VB.Net has a StrReverse function, so I would advise you to just use that (combine with String.Split to break your string into words, and String.Join to put them back together). Also, don't roll your own crypto - at least, not for protecting ...


3

In the situation where you cannot use single tail recursion, for example because you need to alternative between two functions, a mechanism called trampolining has been described. A more recent and thorough discussion of this topic can be found in RĂșnar Bjarnason's paper Stackless Scala With Free Monads. Personally, I would go the easy route and revert to ...


3

The problem is that you are pushing arrays into arrays by calling << in elsif i<arr1.length merged << arr1[i..-1] i=arr1.length elsif j<arr2.length merged << arr2[j..-1] j=arr2.length end and that creates unwanted nested arrays. When you compare array elements by arr1[i] <= arr2[j], the elements of arr1 and arr2 are not ...


3

Let's trace the recursive calls. z(3) is called. Prints "I am from Z" y is 3 and y < 5: "if" is entered. z(4) is called. Prints "I am from Z" y is 4 and y < 5: "if" is entered. z(5) is called. Prints "I am from Z" y is 5 and "if" is NOT entered. This recursive call ends. Prints "I AM FROM Y". This recursive call ...


3

Your problem seems to be that you make a local copy of your memoizer at each function call, then destroy it. Here is a simple one-argument version of your memoizer that seems to work: #include <iostream> #include <functional> #include <unordered_map> template<typename Sig, typename F=Sig* > struct memoize_t; template<typename R, ...


3

The first line is the shebang, which specifies which version of Perl to use. #!/usr/bin/perl The next two lines will help you catch mistakes in your program and make sure you are coding properly. See Why use strict and warnings? use warnings; use strict; print will print the message in quotes. print "Enter in a number\n"; The diamond operator, ...


2

You can do: [y-x for x, y in zip(A[:-1], A[1:])] >>> A = [1, 10, 100, 50, 40] >>> [y-x for x, y in zip(A[:-1], A[1:])] [9, 90, -50, -10] Note that the difference will be negative if the right side is smaller, you can easily fix this (If you consider this wrong), I'll leave the solution for you. Explanation: The best explanation you ...


2

You don't return anything when you do your fetch: if (...) { $file_contents = file_get_contents(...); // no return call here } else { ... return; // return nothing, e.g. null } return $result; // $result is NEVER set in your code You should have return $file_contents. Or better yet: if (...) { $result = get cached data } else { $result ...


2

You can do a list comprehension: >>> A = [1, 10, 100, 50, 40] >>> l=[A[0]]+A >>> [abs(l[i-1]-l[i]) for i in range(1,len(l))] [0, 9, 90, 50, 10]


2

You create a new ArrayList within your method. ArrayList<String> listTokenFunction = new ArrayList<String>();, so the 'old' list is lost and when you ad an entry, it will always be the first one. Try initializing that Arraylist outside of your method as a class variable.


2

In your code, each recursive call to the method is creating its own ArrayList as a local variable. One way to solve this problem is changing the method so that it takes an (initially empty) ArrayList as input and fills it. Each recursive call will take the list as input and add to it. private void checkNextPage(ArrayList<String> listTokenFunction, ...


2

I think what @ksr89 means is that when we apply a for - in loop, we get keys in sorted order. I think this is a valid use case especially in the development of Node.js based ORMs The following function should work and is I think what you are looking for. input = { "Memo": { "itemAmount1": "5", "taxName1": "TAX", ...


2

The time complexity is equal to the number of combinations there are. In this case it is n choose k.


2

Since you are using lists, push_back and pop_back are O(1) operations. Also, you end up generating a valid combination exactly once. Thus, the complexity is O(n choose k).


2

As a wise man once said: "To understand recursion, you must first understand recursion." Anyway - there are a bunch of algorithms that can work recursively. Factorial is one. A factorial of 5! = 5*4*3*2*1. This makes it quite a good case for recursion, because you could also say it's 5 * 4!. This is what the code is doing. When you supply a number to the ...


2

You want to bubble the result up in the recursion, so you must write return self::isDirectFile($str);


2

You don't need a helper method, if you pass an additional string to the method, just pass it's value as a blank as shown in the method call below: public static void substrings(String str, String temp) { if(str.length()==0) { System.out.println(temp); return; } substrings(str.substring(1), ...


1

For a longer recursive solution more in line with your original approach: def deviation(A) : if len(A) < 2 : return [] else : return [abs(A[0]-A[1])] + deviation(A[1:]) Your bracket issue is with your recursive call. Since you have your [deviation(a[1: ])] in its own [] brackets, with every recursive call you're going to be ...


1

[abs(j-A[i+1]) for i,j in enumerate(A[:-1])]


1

Actually recursion is an overkill: def deviation(A): yield 0 for i in range(len(A) - 1): yield abs(A[i+1] - A[i]) Example: >>> A = [3, 5, 2] >>> list(deviation(A)) [0, 2, 3] EDIT: Yet, another, even simplier and more efficient solution would be this: def deviation(A): prev = A[0] for el in A: yield ...


1

You have to use prefix subtraction: change: permute(n--,array); to: permute(--n,array); In this way, you first decrement 'n' and then call permute. In first case you never subtract and you have an infinite recursion.


1

In addition to the answer of Peer Stritzinger: Quadtrees are generally not very suitable for deletion.


1

You can't refer to mainMenu more than once. And this is caused by the fact that you actually have two anchor expressions, one for roles and one for users. There are two ways to fix this. You could split your query into two CTE's (one for roles, one for users). Like this: with roleMainMenu (...) as ( -- role select ... from .... and ...



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