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8

You're ignoring the result of countRec() - and you're iterating within the recursive call, defeating the purpose. (You're also making a recursive call on the same object, with no parameters and no change in state... so that can't do any good.) My recursive approach would be based on a design of: If the next node is null, then the size of the list is 1 ...


7

You doing it wrong in so many ways. 1. - Why create -aux function, when you can just use optional arguments? (defun constants (form &optional lst) (cond ((null form) lst) ... 2. - You don't need so many similar branches, you can write: ((find (car form) '(implies not and or)) (constants (cdr form) lst)) 3. - delete-duplicates MAY modify ...


6

You could use arguments.callee, but it's deprecated. Better just name the functions, and give them all the same names: var rec1 = function rec(n) { /* some code */ rec(n-1); }; var rec2 = function rec(n) { /* some other code */ rec(n-1); }; … where rec is scoped the current function, and points to the current function.


5

From the memory consumption point of view a function parameter is identical to a local vartiable. I.e. there's no difference between the two variants form the point of view of memory consumption, aside from the fact that you introduced a completely unnecessary local variable in main. However, the second variant might be less efficeint in therms of time, ...


5

well I believe it must be recursive function, something like expr({num,X}) -> X; expr({plus, X, Y}) -> expr(X) + expr(Y); expr({minus, X, Y}) -> expr(X) - expr(Y); expr({mul,X, Y}) -> expr(X)*expr(Y); expr(Any) -> io:format("Dont know what to do with ~p~n",[Any]).


5

This is a tricky recursion because it doesn't mention an-1 anywhere like most simple recursive definitions do. That means you shouldn't have any s(n-1) references in your code. In the equation, floor(sqrt(n)) is the parameter to an. Since you call your function s, you should therefore be passing floor(sqrt(n)) to the recursive invocations of s. def s(n): ...


5

Not recursion is the problem here, but your Scanner. I have to admit that I am not too familiar with the Scanner class, but it seems that if you call input.close() and then reenter goodInput later, your System.in is closed. At least, stepping through with the debugger, I found that the line "Integers only please", is printed in the second invocation of ...


4

Why are you complicating things. It's java, use its features. String string1 = "abab"; Pattern p = Pattern.compile("ab"); Matcher m = p.matcher(string1); int count = 0; while (m.find()){ count +=1; } System.out.println(count); Also for your understanding, substring function has following format public String substring(int beginIndex, int endIndex) ...


4

if( y == 0 || x == 0 ) { return 0; } else { return peanoplus(x, peanotimes(x,--y)); }


4

In the second branch of your conditional, you want to return the result: return isPalindrome(str.slice(1,-1)); Otherwise it simply completes the recursive call, exits the if statement, and returns undefined (since it encounters no return statement before the end of the function).


3

How about this: int* reverse(int *array, int arrayLength){ if (arrayLength==1) { int* out=(int*)malloc(sizeof(int)); out[0] = array[0]; return out; } int* left = reverse(array+arrayLength/2, arrayLength-arrayLength/2); int* right = reverse(array,arrayLength/2); int* out = (int*)realloc(left, sizeof(int)*arrayLength); ...


3

You can just use the built-in max(), and a lambda key to make a handy one=liner: max(y, key=lambda x:x[-1]) This works as such: >>> y = [['a', 1], ['am', 4], ['at', 2], ['spam', 8]] >>> max(y, key=lambda x:x[-1]) ['spam', 8] >>> del(y[-1]) >>> y [['a', 1], ['am', 4], ['at', 2]] >>> max(y, key=lambda x:x[-1]) ...


3

Tail recursive calls are the right way to code "loops" in ML (or Ocaml) language (or Scheme, or even most Common Lisp, but sadly not in MELT which has iterative constructs) Look e.g. inside the source code of their standard libraries as an example (eg Ocaml's stdlib). Tail rec calls won't confuse your peers, they are familiar with that. BTW you could also ...


3

Assuming u want to do Ruler like this: 0 1 2 3 4 5 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | ...


3

Your printing occurs after the recursion. Using (25, 2) as an example, the order of your calls with printing looks like decToBin(25, 2): decToBin(12,2): decToBin(6,2): decToBin(3,2): decToBin(1,2): decToBin(0,2): print(0) print(1%2) ...


3

For example, let's calculate factorial(4): n = 4 Since n != 0 and n != 1, the value of factorial(4) is 4 * factorial(3) Let's calculate factorial(3) n = 3 Since n != 0 and n != 1, the value of factorial(3) is 3 * factorial(2) Let's calculate factorial(2) n = 2 Since n != 0 and n != 1, the value of factorial(2) is 2 * factorial(1) Let's calculate ...


2

This is a pretty simple method. Let me know if it doesn't make sense highest = y[0] # set the highest seen so far to the first element for item in y: # loop through all the elements if item[1] > highest[1]: # if the current items second element is higher highest = item # then set it to be the highest so far return highest Recursively: ...


2

I am actually going to propose a bit different way for displaying the results. I think it's more logical but you are welcome to modify it to suit your specific needs. Just as a hint print logical tree of nodes, like below, and then manipulate the results if ever needed. So the tree would look like this for example (Note I added one more depth level) and ...


2

Agree with OP the the hint is "2^n". As with many recursive functions: divide and conquer. This routine first deals with errant paramters and the simple lengths. Next, divide the length in half and reverse each half. Form the result by concatenating the reversed left and right sub-arrays. First, right, then left. Usual clean-up follows #include ...


2

From reading your code, what I can predict is, the problem is in the logic. Inside checkAndResolveCollision(), when you assigning a new co-ordinate to the Node using e1.setLocationInLayout(x, y); you miss to check whether the new co-ordinate that you have assigned to this node, overlaps any of the other node's which we have already checked against this ...


2

If you're a beginner, start from simple things: try to avoid recursion until you understand loops. So I will only comment on the loop version (recursion is a bad approach to this particular problem anyway). If code doesn't do what you want, you should try stepping through it in a debugger to note what exactly it does, or try to explain it as a list of ...


2

A "double pointer" is required because you're changing the value of the pointer within the function. Without even looking at your code, look at this very simple example: void foo(int *x) { x = new int[10]; } int main() { int *p = 0; foo(p); // why is p still NULL? } You will see that the value of p didn't change, even though the function ...


2

It may be that the limit is on stack depth rather than number of recursive calls, and you may well have used up some of that stack depth before the first call to fib(). With fib(555), you'll only be adding 555 stack frames, not 555 + 554. That's because the two terms of the calculation are done sequentially. In other words, fib(555) is called and that uses ...


2

Each function call stores its own copy of arguments. So, call to h(11) won't change n in the first call (h(12)). Expressions in Java are evaluated from left to right. This means that the call h(11) would finish before h(10) is called from h(12). However, in this case this is not important, since the result would be the same either way.


2

I think you just forgot the n (and the tail of a list) here: let rec findYear n = function | [] -> failwith("No person with that year is registrered") | (name,_,(_,n',_)) when n = n' -> name // forgot tail | (name,_,(_,n',_))::tail when n <> n' -> findYear(tail) // forgot n here (should have gotten an error try this: let rec ...


2

You can add few line in match_out void match_out(char *s1, char *s2, char **edit ,int i, int j) { if (s1[i] == s2[j]) { printf("M no edit needed \n" ); } else { printf("S subst %c with %c ",s1[i] , s2[j]); //**from here** printf("%s -> ",s1); s1[i]=s2[j]; printf("%s\n",s1); ...


1

To make all possible full boards you could do import itertools player = ['O', 'X'] itertools.product(player, repeat = 9) Then use a list comprehension to shape those each into 3x3 boards [[i[0:3],i[3:6],i[6:10]] for i in itertools.product(player, repeat = 9)] Result [[('O', 'O', 'O'), ('O', 'O', 'O'), ('O', 'O', 'O')], [('O', 'O', 'O'), ('O', 'O', ...


1

Update the head by adding head = before the cursor.reverseUsingPrevious(head);. Extra tip: Even though the method reverseUsingPrevious probably works as it is, it doesn't call any methods or variables on the local object at all (apart from the call to reverseUsingPrevious), so it could just as well have been static. But rather than making it static, you ...


1

You can use a recursive function as follows. I modified the class and function names a little bit. You don't need to pass 'count' parameter to countSub function, since it will be eventually returned recursively. public class Count { public static void main(String[] argv) { String s2 = new String("ababab"); String s3 = new String("ab"); ...


1

With recursion: factorial = lambda n: n * factorial(n - 1) if (n > 1) else 1 This is similar to your function, except I don't print things out (because it slows it down and is unnecessary). If you try to evaluate it, with, for example, the number 4: factorial 4 4 * factorial(4 - 1) 4 * (3 * factorial(3 - 1)) 4 * (3 * (2 * factorial(2 - 1))) 4 * (3 * ...



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