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5

If you run a module as a script (i.e. give its name to the interpreter, rather than importing it), it’s loaded under the module name __main__. If you then import the same module from your program, it’s reloaded and reexecuted under its real name. If you’re not careful, you may end up doing things twice. ...


4

Let's see! value = foo(raw_input()) # foo is the same as in the question, I won't repeat it here print value Inside your foo, you get this: # foo(1) calls foo(2) and sets x to 2 # foo(2) calls foo(3) and sets x to 3 # foo(3) calls foo(4) and sets x to 4 # foo(4) does: print "Good Job! 4 was right" return 4 # to foo(3) # foo(3) does: return 4 # to foo(2) ...


4

Something like this should work: dir -recurse | ?{ $_.PSIsContainer } | %{ Write-Host $_.FullName (dir $_.FullName | Measure-Object).Count } dir -recurse lists all files under current directory and pipes (|) the result to ?{ $_.PSIsContainer } which filters directories only then pipes again the resulting list to %{ Write-Host $_.FullName (dir ...


4

You said: When I execute path(14,0). I get true. That is half of the truth! Oh, even less than that! In fact you get true not once but many times! ?- path(14,0). true ; true ; true ; true ; true ; true ... There is a simple way to avoid typing ; or SPACE all the time. Simply use the goal false. ?- path(14,0), false **LOOPS** And now, you ...


4

If you remove the static that each call to main gets its own copy of i, initialized to 5, and so your recursion never terminates.


4

Firstly, "implict int" rule has been outlawed a long time ago. int main(i) { ... is not a valid function declaration. The code does not compile in a compliant C compiler. Secondly, expression i+main(++i) is not sufficently sequenced. It causes undefined behavior. It is illegal to read variable i and independently modify variable i in the same expression ...


3

When trying to improve the performance of a piece of code, the first thing to do is eliminate unneeded memory allocations. A few places you can improve this: Mapping over an array is faster than mapping over a list, but not faster than converting to an array, mapping and then converting back to a list. Avoid using Array.append. This results in doing a ...


3

The declaration : int sudoku_backtracker(std::vector< std::vector<int> > board); Does not match the definition : int sudoku_backtracker(std::vector< std::vector<int> > &board) { ... } ^^^


3

You have two nested infinite loops. bsr<bsr+3 is always true, regardless of bsr value. Except when it overflows, but that's undefined behaviour and the compiler is allowed to optimize that to true. for(bsr;bsr<bsr+3;bsr++) { for(bsc;bsc<bsc+3;bsc++)


3

Similar to David's solution this will work in Powershell v3.0 and does not uses aliases in case someone is not familiar with them Get-ChildItem -Directory | ForEach-Object { Write-Host $_.FullName $(Get-ChildItem $_ | Measure-Object).Count} Answer Supplement Based on a comment about keeping with your function and loop structure i provide the following. ...


3

So it's mostly because you are missing a return in def foo(x): if int(x)!=4: x = raw_input("Wrong guess, please enter new value: " ) foo(x) # <-- need return else: print "Good Job! %s was right"%x return x value = foo(x=raw_input("Guess a Number between 1 and 10: ")) print value What's happening is it calls foo(1), ...


3

hasattr calls __getattr__ which would cause the recursion. From the docs: hasattr(object, name) The arguments are an object and a string. The result is True if the string is the name of one of the object’s attributes, False if not. (This is implemented by calling getattr(object, name) and seeing whether it raises an exception or not.) [my emphasis] One ...


3

As state in the comment, you reach the template depth limit, and use the wrong compiler: so use a C++ compiler as g++ And then you may pass this argument to increase depth limit -depth=1000 or you may instantiate intermediate template as template struct NumberGeneration<500>; or rewrite your template to not use a depth linear with N something like ...


2

Don't raise all values by one; instead treat ABCD as if it were an Arabic numeral in base 100 (the "digits" are the integers 1-100 and 1 is your "zero" digit), and write code which generates all such numerals. Basically, set A.B.C.D to 1.1.1.1; work out the sum, search for a match in the array; increment D; if D is beyond 100, reset to one and increment C; ...


2

There is a more generic way to do it. You want to fold over a 2d array. They don't have a fold defined in the Array2D module, but you can write one. let fold f state (arr: 'a [,]) = Seq.cast<'a> arr |> Seq.fold f state We "cheat" a little here, cast gives us a flat sequence of elements from the array, which we later pass to a regular ...


2

Procedure should be: ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[SSP_ActionItem] @ActionItemId int AS BEGIN WITH ActionItemList AS ( -- Anchor SELECT ActionItem.ActionItemId, ActionItem.ItemName, ActionItem.ParentActionItemId FROM ActionItem WHERE ActionItemId=@ActionItemId UNION ALL -- Recursive query SELECT ...


2

Try the following code: def foo(x): if int(x)!=4: x = raw_input("Wrong guess, please enter new value: " ) return foo(x) else: print "Good Job! %s was right"%x return x value = foo(x=raw_input("Guess a Number between 1 and 10: ")) print value You can think each call to the function foo, creates a new variable x. ...


2

Well, the way you are doing it the entire "Get-ChildItem" cmdlet needs to complete before the foreach loop can begin iterating. Are you sure you're waiting long enough? If you run that against very large directories (like C:) it is going to take a pretty long time. Edit: saw you asked earlier for a way to make your function do what you are asking, here you ...


2

This time this declaration: std::pair<int, int> find_empty_spot(std::vector< std::vector<int> > board); does not match definition: std::pair<int, int> find_empty_spot(std::vector< std::vector<int> > board,int row,int column) neither usage matches definition: std::pair<int,int> empty_spot = ...


2

I agree with @mydogisbox's general point - going back and forth from array to list is not going to help much performance wise. That being said, the first problem I had was, I had to dig a bit to just figure out what the code was doing - so I took the liberty to make a first rewrite, just to see if I understood what was going on: let extract1 (ids:string[]) ...


2

You are overloading the paint() method, therefore swing won't know that it is the paint method it has to use. If you want to overload it anyway just add: public void paint(Graphics g){ paint(g,n,x,y,size);//Place here your initial values } You could just create a new method name and add it to the paint method for clarity tho. This way you will get it ...


2

Don't use an int for result. Declare it to be a double. Also, do the division using a double literal for the numerator. These two problems were conspiring to create the bad behavior. In particular, 1/i was integer division and was evaluating to 0 for all i > 1. If you use 1.0/i, that won't happen because i gets promoted to a double before the division. ...


2

This problem can be simplified if you thought about permutations of the numbers. You can simply get a list of permutations from your numbers, sum up each permutation and sort. If you find the correct difference between the numbers, then you can print them out. I suggest you look up more on doing permutations in java (which will involve some recursion).


2

Not having any specific knowledge of Ada, apparently all approaches might work equally well; however, 3. might result in an implementation that is more difficult to understand. For evaluating 1. against 2., it might me interesting whether the case in which the execution is to be aborted is more a use-case or an error case. If early termination in the ...


2

You're testing the key and not the nested array value, and you're doing nothing with the return value. It needs to be this: function validateVars(array $vars){ foreach ($vars as &$value) { if (is_array($value)) { $value = validateVars($value); } else if ($value == '') { $value = false; } } ...


1

Everything seems perfect except for one condition :- when b<0. For b<0,simply return return (1.0/a)*MyPow(a,abs(b)-1); //where abs(b) is absolute value of b. OR return (1.0/a)*(MyPow(a,b+1)); Also,your definition of function is not valid for performing negative exponentiation,you should change it to float MyPow(int a,int b)


1

Of course there are many different ways you could achieve this recursively -- here is one of them: public void drawTree(Graphics g, int x, int y, int arity, int depth) { if (depth > 0) { int childDistanceX = (int) (Math.pow(arity, depth) * DISTANCE_X); int childX = x - (arity - 1) * childDistanceX / 2; int childY = y - ...


1

I looks like every time you enter calculateAnswer() you create a new instance of the ArrayList and assign it to the tempList variable that is only in scope within that method. Seems like you need to have access to a tempList that is persistent across multiple calculateAnswer() calls.


1

The problem arises because you can go in circles in the maze. E.g. in your maze you have the connections 0 - 1 - 7 - 5 - 3 - 0. You have not taken any measures to ensure that the search does not follow those circles blindly. A usual approach would be to add an argument to your path predicate that contains the already visited regions (initially empty). Then ...


1

Let's write a recursive function to output all combinations of all subsets of a list. For a given list, the combinations are the the list itself, plus all combinations of the list minus each member. That's easy to translate straight to Python: def combinations(seq): yield seq for i in range(len(seq)): for combination in combinations(seq[:i] ...



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