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6

The trick is that if the compiler notices the tail recursion, it can compile a goto instead. It will generate something like the following code: int fun_optimized(int n, int sofar) { start: if(n == 0) return sofar; sofar = sofar*n; n = n-1; goto start; } And as you can see, the stack space is reused for each iteration. Note that ...


5

You need to stop searching when you find, but you're not stopping your for loop. Instead, return null for the "not found" case and return the first time you see non-null: public static HtmlTable getTableFromDomElement(DomElement element) throws Exception { HtmlTable table; if(element instanceof HtmlTable){ ...


4

The part of your code which is presumably the recursion termination if not l: print('done!', x) return is doing pretty much the same as returning None, whereas it returns non-None stuff in other cases. So, when you do the recursive calls, just check the return value for this, and return without continuing the redundant calculations if this is the ...


4

This algorithm works if the "source" array remains unchanged, so each index will be treated correctly. Let's look at the output of your code: 1.A B C 2.A C B 3.C A B 4.C B A 5.A B C 6.A C B As you can see, in iteration no. 3, where it was supposed to shift B to the first index, your shifting C instead, because you already moved B ...


4

The code marks cells visited as soon as an arbitrary path reaches that cell. But this cell is afterwards aswell marked as visited for all other cells and won't be visited again. This means the algorithm only finishes a subset of the paths and some traversals break off somewhere in the middle of the array for bigger arrays. You'll have to mark the cells as ...


4

When you return 1, I suppose you could do StackTraceElement[] sts=Thread.currentThread.getStackTrace() And count all the StackTraceElement where the method name is factorial.


4

So the issue I ran into when attempting to create a recursive generator function, is that once you go past your first depth level each subsequent yield is yielding to its parent call rather than the iteration implementation (the loop). As of php 7 a new feature has been added that allows you to yield from a subsequent generator function. This is the new ...


3

In general, F# lets you use let rec .. and .. not just for defining mutually recursive functions, but also for defining mutually recursive values. This means that you might be able to write something like this: let rec Expression = Chainl1 Term AddSub and Paren = Then <| LiteralChar '(' <| ThenBind Expression (fun e -> ...


3

I would do something like this: ('a'..'f').to_a.repeated_permutation(4).to_a #=> returns 1296 different combination from ['a','a','a','a'] to ['f','f','f','f']


3

The error is caused because this line which uses power: answer = power(base, expon) comes before these lines which define power: def power(x, y): if y == 0: return 1 if y >= 1: return x * power(x, y-1) To fix this, you'll need to define power before you use it. Edit - Here's how I would rearrange the code: def power(x, y): ...


3

your function is fine but you are not logging "swears" var recursiveSwear = function(swear, times){ if(times == 1) return swear; else console.log(swear); //log them here return recursiveSwear(swear, times - 1); }; console.log(recursiveSwear("Shut up!", 6));


3

When doing recursive work, you often need use the current value in conjunction with return value of the recursive call. In this case, you can append them as follows: var recursiveSwear = function(swear, times){ if(times == 1) return swear; else return swear + ' ' + recursiveSwear(swear, times - 1); }; console.log(recursiveSwear("Oh ...


3

In Python functions return None by default. You have problem with indentation, therefore your function radio unexpectedly ends and the subsequent code block considered an independent and not belonging to the radio. To solve it - fix the indentation like this: def radio(start,stop,step): time=stop-start newstart=start+step if time !=0: ...


3

You are trying to modify the pointer you pass in to addNode, but the pointer is passed by-value, so you won't see the modification at the call site. To fix this, take in the pointer by reference: linkedlist *addNode(linkedlist*& temp)


3

You're only creating one instance of a FileObject, and just adding it to the list over and over again. Despite using the setter methods (like setName() and setPath()) to modify its properties, this is not going to give you the results you're expecting. Java does not copy an object when it adds it to a collection/data structure. So by calling the set...() ...


3

Not returning a value from a fuction which should return a value is undefined behavior. If it works by any luck then it's not an optimization but just a coincidence given by how and where these automatic allocated values are stored.


3

Because depth_first_search(node.child_left, target) isn't the last line of your method, it's value will never be returned. You need to return it's value if it's value is not nil. Here is an example of one way to solve your problem: def depth_first_search(node, target) if node.value == target puts "yes" return node end left = ...


3

Basic solution for the case where you want to call the number of recursions for every possible input value (which in the case of factorial isn't that useful, but it could be in other cases): static int thenumberoftimesiwascalled; public static int factorial(int n){ thenumberoftimesiwascalled++; if(n==0){ return 1; } else return ...


2

I dunno why neither Leigh or Scott actually made their comments answers, but they're both right. You have this reference to result outside your function: <cfset result.enrollments = getCorrectionList(SESSION.id,SESSION.term) /> And at the end of your function you do this: <cfreturn result /> Which in effect means you're doing this: ...


2

I think your problem is probably here: transposee.remove(transposee[index]) The remove removes the first occurence of the value passed to it from the list. Your test matrix has several duplicate values and so the one removed may not be the one you want removed to create your mineur array. Your algorithm works for random arrays because such duplicates are ...


2

I think you are over-complicating things: getLines does returns an iterator, as you said. You can materialise an iterator into a list using its .toList method: Source.fromFile("myfile.txt").getLines.toList As an aside, what if the .toList method didn't exist? You could then use a recursive function to convert an iterator to a list (if you really wanted ...


2

The following stop condition is wrong, it should return 1. if (p == 0) { return 0; // should return 1 } If you use this, you cannot use multiplication operator * in Java. You can have a multiplyBy function that should not mutate the callee: public int multiplyBy(int x) { return this.value * x; } And as you can see in the above method, you need to ...


2

Time complexity varies a lot according to the tree's structure. For balanced tree, each path from root to leaf is at most of O(logn), and there are no more than n leaves (obviously), so O(nlogn) For a tree which is a single chain with a single leaf - it's O(n), since you do it at most once. For a tree where each right subtree is of height exactly one, it's ...


2

array_walk_recursive ($array, function (&$val) { $val += 1; }); print_r($array);


2

The body of your recursive function doesn't actually have any kind of output. Shouldn't you move your console.log inside the else clause? e.g.: var recursiveSwear = function(swear, times){ if(times == 1) return swear; else { console.log(swear); return recursiveSwear(swear, times - 1); } };


2

You're encountering integer overflow. factorial(17) is 3.5568743e+14, which is well beyond the bounds of int. When an integer operation overflows, it can end up negative. For example: int x = Integer.MAX_VALUE; x++; System.out.println(x); // Very large negative number In your case, you'll have overflowed several times - even if the result were positive, ...


2

In fact this function int recurse(int c){ //printf("%d", c); if(c<10){ recurse(c+1); }else{ return(c); } } has undefined behaviour because it returns nothing in case when c < 10 This function int recurse(int c){ //printf("%d", c); if(c<10){ recurse(c+1); } return(c); } always returns the value of argument c independently of the value ...


2

Suppose that we start off by walking down the left and right spines of the tree to determine their heights. We'll either find that they're the same, in which case the last row is full, or we'll find that they're different. If the heights come back the same (say the height is h), then we know that there are 2h - 1 nodes and we're done. Otherwise, the heights ...


2

According to your function parameter declaration (int** A), the 2D array is implemented as a "jagged array" (i.e. a top-level 1D array of pointers to 1D subarrays). It is not possible to create a jagged 2D subarray you described without introducing and initializing some extra data. In order to produce such 2D subarray, you will have to create a new ...


2

You could use functools.reduce: import functools def rsetattr(obj, attr, val): pre, _, post = attr.rpartition('.') return setattr(rgetattr(obj, pre), post, val) def rgetattr(obj, attr): return functools.reduce(getattr, [obj]+attr.split('.')) if attr else obj rgetattr and rsetattr are drop-in replacements for getattr and setattr, which can ...



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