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6

Let's step through it! nextWord "an apple" Since "an apple" doesn't pattern match against [], we're in the second case. Substituting in 'a': "n apple" for c : cs, we get: nextWord ('a':"n apple") | isSpace 'a' = ([], "apple") | otherwise = ('a': word, other) where (word, other) = nextWord "n apple" isSpace 'a' is False, so this simplifies to ...


5

A solution could be: find what is the maximum value M in in A1 and how many times it appears check if it's the same for A2, including the count find what is the maximum value M1 among all values smaller than M and how many times is present in A1 check if it's the same for A2, including the count find what is the maximum value M2 among all values smaller ...


5

Effectively the 3 sinh operations are performed consecutively, each with its own rounding; just like your x y z example. So, no, there is no difference; all the methods are equally (in)accurate I believe.


4

But how can main calculate the answer when the factorial formula comes after it? First thing — main does not calculate the answer; it's your factorial function which does it for you. Also there are 3 steps which I feel you need to know about when writing programs: You write the code in a file. You compile the file and the compiler checks for ...


3

Let's analyse what the edges in the two graphs mean. An edge from subproblem a to b represents a relation where a solution of b is used in the computation of a and must be solved before it. (The other way round in the other case.) Does topological sort come to mind? One way to do a topological sort is to perform a Depth First Search and on your way out of ...


3

Guidance (hopefully!) You do not need a global list variable, like you're currently using (unless you're trying to do some complex optimisation – don't worry about it for now). In fact, it looks like this global list variable is what's causing your problems. I will try to walk you through the correct way to do this from the beginning. First, try to ...


3

One way to keep track of the position is by returning it. In the code below I use a helper function that returns the partially-built unflattened list as well as the current index in the flattened list. def unflatten(l): def helper(l, start): if isinstance(l[start], int): ret = [] start += 1 for _ in range(l[start - 1]): sub, ...


3

Leaving out the return statement from a function that is supposed to return an int is undefined behavior. It's just coincidence that your program works. Don't count on it. Change int i = n * Fact(n - 1); to return n * Fact(n - 1);


3

Is it all about JVM? that is what you results suggest. The JVM does heavily optimise the code. Or does ruby use only single core of machine? Your Java program appears to only use one core as well, so that wouldn't matter. What is the reason for this nonlinear performance loose in Ruby? The performance in Ruby looks linear with the amount ...


2

The interface to numtostring() is a C-like interface. Apart from the choice of I/O operations in the main() test program shown in the question, the code could perfectly well be C instead of C++. The requirement not to change the interface to numtostring() and for it to be recursive makes it messier and less efficient than it should be, doubly so if you're ...


2

In halfy = round (y/2), you have y :: Int. However, the (/) operator is defined in the Fractional typeclass (which Int is not an instance of; think about which Int could represent e.g. 3/2). However, there are also the integer division operators div and quot which will give you rounded, Int results. So just replace that definition of halfy with halfy = y ...


2

The infinite recursion probably happens as part of the printing. You can avoid this by: Don't print the circular structure Enable circle-detection in the standard printer: (setf *print-circle* t)


2

What you're describing is a major effect of tail call optimization, which Python explicitly doesn't do because Guido feels that it isn't worth the tradeoffs, especially in terms of debugging information. If the recursive version of the algorithm is clearer, you might consider explicitly doing del neighs once you no longer need it - this has the save effect ...


2

Try the following #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> size_t count( int x, int y ) { const unsigned int BASE = 10; unsigned int a = abs( x ); size_t n = 0; do { unsigned int z = a; unsigned int b = abs( y ); _Bool equal = 0; do { equal = a % BASE == b % BASE; ...


2

public bool Search(string val) { if (String.Compare(Value, val, false) == 0) return true; if (String.Compare(Value, val, false) < 0) { if (RightChild != null) return RightChild.Search(val); // added 'return' /*[REMOVED]else return false;*/ } else { ...


2

The for loop inside the implementation is not necessary: you are performing too many swaps as the result of having that loop. In fact, the whole point of this exercise has been to eliminate the loop. Fix your implementation by adding an extra function that measures the length of the string once, and then calls a two-argument recuverse_impl, like this: void ...


2

Try this: void recuverse(char s[]) { int len = strlen(s); if (len <= 1) return; char c = s[len-1]; s[len-1] = 0; recuverse(s+1); s[len-1] = s[0]; s[0] = c; }


2

As near as I can tell, this is the only way to accomplish what you ask for with such unreasonable restrictions. This would be a stupid, stupid way to write this function, but I believe it does what was asked for within the specified guidelines. // Reverses a string in place. // Note: string cannot be a constant, without write permission void reverse(char ...


2

My C solution uses no extra libraries (stdio instead of iostream), and the same function signature. #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> void recuverse(char s[]){ char saved; int len = strlen(s); if (len > 1) { saved = s[len-1]; // keep last char s[len-1] = 0; // shorten string ...


2

It seems that I have understood what you need that is what approach you are trying to implement. You could write the function like void recuverse( char s[] ) { recuverse( s , std::strlen( s ) ); } void recuverse( char s[], size_t n ) { if ( !( n < 2 ) ) { std::swap( s[0], s[n-1] ); recuverse( s + 1, n - 2 ); } } But it ...


2

First call to function, input 1234 Second call to fucntion, input 123 Third call to function, input 12 Fourth call to function, input 1 print 1 and return print 2 and return print 3 and return print 4 and return Output: 1234


2

Maybe this will be of help: set.seed(1) X1 <- runif(50, 0, 1) X2 <- runif(50, 0, 10) # I included another variable just for a better demonstration Y <- runif(50, 0, 1) df <- data.frame(X1,X2,Y) rolling_lms <- lapply( seq(20,nrow(df) ), function(x) lm( Y ~ X1+X2, data = df[1:x , ]) ) Using the above lapply function you the recursive ...


2

My approach would be something like this: import re def make_tree(data): items = re.findall(r"\(|\)|\w+", data) def req(index): result = [] item = items[index] while item != ")": if item == "(": subtree, index = req(index + 1) result.append(subtree) else: ...


2

Your code has undefined behaviour because function flip declared as having return type int actually returns nothing. Also it seems that function flip does all the job. So it is not clear what is the sense of function printnumber. You could simply define the function the following way #include <stdio.h> void print_number( int n ) { if ( n < 0 ...


2

your code is fine, just delete the whitespace between euclid ( to euclid( def euclid(m, n) n == 0 ? m : euclid(n, m % n) end


2

Modified to print values from most significant to least. Use the remainder operator %. "The result of the / operator is the quotient from the division of the first operand by the second; the result of the % operator is the remainder. In both operations, if the value of the second operand is zero, the behavior is undefined" C11dr §6.5.5 On each ...


2

There is nothing in your question that specifies the digits being input are part of an actual int. Rather, its just a sequence of chars that happen to (hopefully) be somewhere in { 0..9 } and in so being, represent some non-bounded number. That said, you can send as many digit-chars as you like to the following, be it one or a million, makes no difference. ...


1

A bit hacky but kinda does the trick anyway :) You definitely have your nested lists. import re import ast input = "(TOP (S (NP (PRP I)) (VP (VBP need) (NP (NP (DT a) (NN flight)) (PP (IN from) (NP (NNP Atlanta))) (PP (TO to) (NP (NP (NNP Charlotte)) (NP (NNP North) (NNP Carolina)))) (NP (JJ next) (NNP Monday))))))" # replaces all brackets by square ...


1

First of all, what you wrote is not a recursion. The idea is that the function will call itself with the less number of digits every time until it'll check them all. Here is a snippet which might help you to understand the idea: int countNum(int val) { if(!val) return 0; return countNum(val/10) + ((val % 10) < 5); }


1

It works in this manner: let's take an example to find factorial of 3 Recursion : As factorial of 0 is 1 and factorial of 1 is also 1, so you can write like if(n <= 1) return 1;



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