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13

In general the simplest approach to this problem would be to simply replace the recursion with a non-recursive solution. This would aswell most likely improve the performance if implemented properly. The approach with killing the thread is rather ugly - i'd highly recommend not to use this. But there's no way to break out of a recursion without rewinding the ...


11

The answer to your question is quite simple: Just do it the usual way, i.e., unwinding the stack yourself with returns. Why? Because this is not as slow as you might think. Unless the computation in your recursion is highly trivial and the stack depth is very very high, the returning will never influence the runtime of your algorithm noticeably. Basically, ...


5

Using this code I also see large timing difference (in favor of the recursive version) with GCC 4.9.3 in Cygwin. I get 13.411 seconds for iterative 4.29101 seconds for recursive Looking at the assembly code it generated with -O3, I see two things The compiler replaced tail recursion in isDivisableRec with a cycle and then unrolled the cycle: each ...


5

Solution for any parameter (as long as the result is countable) Edit: This version avoids a possible problem with len = Math.pow(left.length, right.length) and the problem with length over 36 (cnr!). How it works: Example: combine(['A', 'B'], [1, 2, 3]) all possible rows are 2^3 = 8. The distribution is in this example binary, but with more ...


5

The first method sums the 1's, whereas your latter method just print the result of what(), which can be nothing more or nothing less than 1. Example of the first method: what(4) = what(2) + what(3) = what(0) + what(1) + what(1) + what(2) = 1 + 1 + 1 + what(0) + what(1) = 3 + 1 + 1 = 5 or, if you like a better visualization: ...


4

I tried with NSRegularExpression since CoreData & NSPredicate seems to manage them, but I couldn't have a working solution (maybe linked to my no expertise in Regex, but could be a lead). I tried also with NSCharacterSet, but it couldn't say it the number of occurrences was correct.. This maybe not the more sexy way to do it, but, here what you could ...


4

I'll try to clean it up a bit, but this works: $needle = ["chapter one", 'foo', 'bar']; $array = [ [ "name" => "Intro", "id" => "123", "children" => [ "name" => "foo", "id" => "234", "children" => [ "name" => "mur", "id" => "445", ...


4

Say you have some inner, repeated recursion, like this not-so-sensible code: public A f(B b) { C c = new C(); return recf(b, c); } private A recf(B b, C c) { ... A a = recf(b2, c2); if (a != null) { // found return a; } ... return recf(b3, c3); } This will yield a sequence of returns when found (a != null). The ...


4

You can use CPAN module List::Permutor to print all possible permutations. For example: use List::Permutor; my $perm = new List::Permutor qw/ fred barney betty /; while (my @set = $perm->next) { print "One order is @set.\n"; } Another module is Algorithm::Permute - Handy and fast permutation with object oriented interface.


4

A simple self-calling function can do it. function removeMeta(obj) { for(prop in obj) { if (prop === '$meta') delete obj[prop]; else if (typeof obj[prop] === 'object') removeMeta(obj[prop]); } } var myObj = { "part_one": { "name": "My Name", "something": "123", "$meta": { "test": "test123" } }, ...


3

Let's try a much simpler example: let xs = 1 : xs in xs OK, so xs points to a (:) node. The head-pointer from here points to 1, and the tail-pointer points to xs (i.e., back to itself). So this is either a circular list, or an infinite list. (Haskell regards the two as the same thing.) So far, so good. Now, let's try a harder example: let xs = 1 : map ...


3

You're on the right track with NSPredicate. And the phase you're looking for is fault tolerant search and it solved by Levenshtein distance. What you basically need to do is make an || combination with queries in single queries. Let's assume you have all your words in NSArray. You need to call a method filteredArrayUsingPredicate: on it, BUT it's not be ...


3

Here is a simple recursive function that gives you the nth Triangular number: triag 0 = 0 triag n = n + triag (n-1) Your solution triag' = zipWith (+) [1..] $ 0 : triag' is something more fancy: It's corecursive (click, click). Instead of calculating the nth number by reducing it to the value of smaller inputs, you define the whole infinite sequence of ...


3

Your recursive call should return the result: if(head(str1).equals(head(str2))){ return isSubstring(tail(str1), tail(str2)); }


3

If you change your algorithm to maintain its own stack rather than using the system CPU stack you can just discard the stack.


3

// Helper function function removeProps(obj,keys){ if(obj instanceof Array){ for(var i = 0; i < obj.length; i++){ removeProps(obj[i],keys); } } else { var props = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj); for(var i = 0; i < props.length; i++){ var key = props[i]; if(keys.indexOf(key) !== -1){ ...


3

array is an int*. *array therefore is an int. You can't say int i; i[0], so why would you be able to say (*array)[0]? Just access it normally, by saying array[n] instead of (*array)[n]. Also, in your main function , call recursion with recursion(n, length);, not recursion(n, &length);. You're passing the array, not a pointer to the array.


3

You are ignoring the return values of recursive calls. You need to explicitly return those too: elif input[mid] > target: return bisect(input[:mid], target) elif input[mid] <= target: return bisect(input[mid:], target) Recursive calls are just like any other function call; they return a result to the caller. If you ignore the return value ...


3

I'd use LINQ to XML for this. My first somewhat inefficient way of doing this would be: foreach (var element in doc.Descendants()) { int indexInLevel = element.ElementsBeforeSelf().Count() + 1; var parent = element.Parent; string prefix = parent == null ? "" : (string) parent.Attribute("index") + "."; element.SetAttributeValue("index", ...


3

This is an example of undefined behavior. Because the value can't be known before it is assigned, you can't predict what will happen. Running the same code on a different machine, or compiled with different settings, can yield different results.


3

Local variables (not initialized) have indeterminate value in C. Reading them prior to assigning a value results in undefined behavior. Nice quote from wikipedia article In computing, an uninitialized variable is a variable that is declared but is not set to a definite known value before it is used. It will have some value, but not a predictable ...


2

the problem is, you don't print the actual number n. Change your code to: public static String recursion (int n) { //set s to the number n String s = "" + n; if (n != 1) { //change position of the separator if (n % 2 == 0) return s + ", " + recursion(n / 2); //change position of the separator else return s + ", " ...


2

One way to improve recursion performance is to reduce the number of parameters to the bare minimum needed. Another way is to replace recursion with iteration. This requires algorithmic analysis or insight. Yet another way is to reduce the levels of recursion. This also requires analysis and insight. After a glance at your code, it does look like it is ...


2

Here is the pseudo-code (untested for what you want to do) // in your controller app.controller('YourController', ['$scope', 'AttendeeFactory', function($scope, AttendeeFactory) { ... AttendeeFactory.fetchAttendees(event_id, offset); ... }]); // in the state change handler that matches leaving your view AttendeeFactory.pause(); // in your ...


2

Well, your algorithm is not pretty. Here is a better one int check = 0; foreach (var c in input) { if (c == '(') { check++; } else if (c == ')') { check--; } if (check < 0) { return false; // error, closing bracket without opening brackets first } } return check == 0; // > 0 error, missing some closing ...


2

As we can see from your code, with an array defined like char s[10] and the input being a?b?c?d?e? is too big an input to be held in s along with the null-terminator by scanf("%s",s); You need to use a bigger array. Otherwise, in attempt to add the terminating null after the input, the access is being made to out-of-bound memory which invokes ...


2

The problem is that you seem to recurse one step for each number you try, that will consume every sane stack. I'd suggest that you use iteration as well and use return in order to do back up (that way you should only use 81 stack frames or so - here it fails when you get a thousand levels of stack frames). I've done a solver before and it will find the ...


2

As it was pointed out by other people, the stack must be rewinded. Having another thread is ugly and probably way slower than than throwing an exception. I would try to find a non-recursive approach or do normal recursion with proper returns. Maybe if you give an example of what your are trying to do people can point you into the right direction. If I ...


2

I'm having a hard time understanding your code, but I think your problem is - you're trying do to it quite a heavy weight sort of a way, but importantly - you're not actually 'unwinding' the tail of your recursion. The point of a recursive algorithm is you traverse deep but collate the results. So I'd approach your problem like this: #!/usr/bin/env perl ...


2

In Laravel, hasMany() and belongsTo() creates Parent & Child Categories relationship. Simply use in Model that extends Eloquent. For sample, public function getChildValues() { return $this->hasMany('Category', 'parentid'); } public function getParentValues() { return $this->belongsTo('CategoryMN', 'id'); } ...



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