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9

If the if condition is true, then it doesn't return immediately. After calling partition, it will exit the if statement, and continue to the end. If you want the value calculated by the recursion to be returned, you need to change it to if(low < high){ System.out.println("Somehow this point has been reached 2"); //some more code return ...


6

The numbers shown to you are not the actual values, because calling str on a number doesn't show you all the digits. If you use repr instead, you'll get this: Dottie number: 0.7390851332151607 Previous = 0.7390851332151607 Current = 0.7390851332151607 Previous = 0.7390851332151606 Current = 0.7390851332151607 Previous = 0.7390851332151608 Current = ...


5

You can describe infinite types with a newtype: newtype Env = Env {getEnv :: Map String ([Val] -> Env -> [Val] -> Val, Int))} This will typecheck, and the runtime representation will be as if there were no wrapper.


5

Of course not because if it were we'd know that R has native memoization support. Which it does not. Hence... It is however cheap to do after the fact as I discuss eg in the intro chapter of the Rcpp book because our "Hello, world!" really is the Fibonacci sequence ;-)


4

You have a sequence-point issue. On the same line as you are calling ackerman, you are using a value that is affected by that call. This is undefined behaviour. Do this instead: int result = ackerman(m,n); printf("%d %d", result, w); There is a good question on StackOverflow with some excellent answers related to sequence-points. It's related to C++, ...


4

What you really need is two functions, one inside the other: function containsFiveOrMoreDivs(domElement) { var count = 0; function doCount(domElement) { if (domElement && domElement.tagName === "DIV") { count++; } //base case: if (count >= 5) { return true; } else { if ...


4

We can keep the same signature, because the function does the same thing. charFound :: Char -> String -> Bool When you are performing recursion you always want to make sure you consider your base case, in this case it would be when you are looking for a character in an empty String, which should obviously always return false. charFound c "" = False ...


4

The post increment and decrement operators actually increment or decrement the values afer the expression is evaluated, means it will change the values of a and b after they have been passed to the function. This way you'll end up passing unchanged values of a and b to add () funtion all the time which will cause a stack overflow (causing the segmentation ...


4

This fails because the decltype expression needs to work out the return type of bar for those arguments, so it needs to instantiate all the bar templates, which involves looking at that decltype expression which needs to work out the return type of bar for those arguments, so it needs to instantiate all the bar templates... I'm sure you can imagine how that ...


4

I don't think so. Looking at https://github.com/wch/r-source/blob/trunk/src/nmath/gamma.c (assuming that's what .Primitive("gamma") finds), it looks like gammafn uses a Chebyshev polynomial to find gamma for inputs with a floating-point absolute value < 10, and returns exp((y - 0.5) * log(y) - y + M_LN_SQRT_2PI + ((2*y == (int)2*y)? ...


3

See the error message. Your problem is you defined inputNumbers variable inside the code block and it's not available outside in your system.out statement. It's got nothing to do with recursion.


3

"Natural" (or just "Structural") recursion is the best way to start teaching students about recursion. This is because it has the wonderful guarantee that Joshua Taylor points out: it's guaranteed to terminate[*]. Students have a hard enough time wrapping their heads around this kind of program that making this a "rule" can save them a huge amount of ...


3

You need to replace the recursive regex with subroutine call: test\{(a(?1)*b)\} See demo These are very similar to regular expression recursion. Instead of matching the entire regular expression again, a subroutine call only matches the regular expression inside a capturing group. You can make a subroutine call to any capturing group from anywhere in ...


3

The function did not continue. You are seeing the stack unwind as the recursive calls return. In other words, the Previous = ... Current = information in printed after you made the recursive call, so you are seeing this information in reverse. Those print calls do not show the full precision; Python only prints the first 12 or so decimals, not the full 50+ ...


3

It's in the same spirit of @MaggsWeb's solution but I post it anyway :) function printHtml($key, $value) { if(!is_array($value) && is_numeric($key)) { echo $value; } else { foreach($value as $k => $v) { if(is_numeric($key)) { printHtml($k, $v); } else { ...


2

I thins it makes sense to define a function isVowel :: Char->Bool and after that write something like this : noVowels :: String -> String noVowels [] = [] noVowels (x:xs) |isVowel x = noVowels xs |otherwise = x : noVowels xs If you don't want to define one more function you can try next code : noVowels :: String ->String noVowels [] = [] ...


2

Version B will not work because each time the function is called the counter is redeclared, so counter never increments.


2

Variables in Javascript exist in function scope. Every time you call containsFiveOrMoreDivs, count will always be 0 in your version B. Hence, infinite recursion. What you can do, however, is pass in 'count' each time you call from within the function, and use that (ensuring it's initialised correctly the first time): var containsFiveOrMoreDivs = ...


2

I think the count parameter is useless with Bloodworth approach since he cancels it out every time... I would go for private int matchQuery(BST bst, String start, String end) { if (bst == null) return 0; int count = 0; if (bst.key != null && withinRange(bst.key, start, end)) count++; count += matchQuery(bst.right, start, end); ...


2

I think the problem might be that you only return the right side of the recursion tree, so if count was increased on the left, it is forgotten. Instead, you could try changing your return statement the following way: private int matchQuery(BST T, String start, String end, int count) { if (T == null) return count; if(T.key != null && ...


2

I'm tempted to say the recurrence is T(n) = T(n/2) + O(1) If you rewrite the general case as double temp = power2(base, n/2); // T(n/2) if (n%2 == 0) { return power2(temp, 2); // O(1) by looking at the base case } else { return power2(temp, 2) * base; // O(1) by looking at the base case } which makes it O(log(n)) This document covers the ...


2

I don't want to have a helper swap function if possible. And you don't need it - simply return the second and the first element and you're done: var pairSwapRecursive = function(arr) { if (arr.length < 2) { return arr; } return [arr[1], arr[0]].concat(pairSwapRecursive(arr.slice(2))); }; So as any other recursive algorithm it: ...


2

Here is a solution: it is not perfect as it has an extra bunch along the main stems compared to the drawing you posted. Let me know if that works for you. from turtle import * def drawFlake(length, depth): "draws a flake" if depth > 0: for _ in range(6): forward(length) drawFlake(length // 3, depth - 1) ...


2

Your main problem is that when you call getSubviewsOfView(subview as! UIView) (recursively, within the function), you aren't doing anything with the result. You also can delete the count == 0 check, since in that case the for…in loop will just be skipped. You also have a bunch of unnecessary casts Assuming your desire is to get a flat array of CheckCircle ...


2

Yes the issue is because you do a post increment/decrement, adding or subtracting AFTER going into the function. You actually go into an endless loop that probably gives you a segmentation fault. Also, your function definition is wrong. This should be your code: int add(int a,int b) { if (a==0) return b; else return add(--a,++b); ...


2

I think the problem is that you were thinking iteratively but used a recursive approach. The iterative approach has a global variable which may be updated at each step: function numOccurencesIterative(arr, val) { var count = 0; for(var i=0; i<arr.length; ++i) if(arr[i] === val) ++count; return count; } However, when using recursive approaches, ...


2

Shouldn't a recursive method end as soon as you get to a return? and why doesn't it here? No, the way it works in general is that when a function call returns, it only returns for that function call, and then the immediate caller may continue execution. It doesn't matter whether the function is recursive or not, each function call is separate and each ...


2

It may be better to break this up into specific goals instead: What you want to do when the string is null or empty What you want to do with a string of size < 2 What you want to do with a string of size >= 2 ...and what the conditions are for each scenario. Note that the code that follows is mostly untested; it's meant to give you a rough idea but ...


2

Essentially this is a summation from 1 to n sum5(3) basically calculates (3 + 2 + 1) Just think how it would look like in the computer, I will do it with sum5(3) call sum5(3) 1. n != 0 thus return sum5(2) + 3 2. n != 0 thus return sum5(1) + 2 3. n != 0 thus return sum5(0) + 1 4. n == 0 thus return 0 now we go back up sum5(1) = sum5(0) + 1 => 1 | ...


2

In natural language the function returns its parameter plus the value of the call to itself with the parameter decrease by 1 - kind of its predecessor. Which gives you 10 + 9 + 8 + 7 + 6 + 5 + 4 + 3 + 2 + 1 + 0 = 55 This is very basic stuff, you should read up on recursion in some introductory computer science book.



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