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5

First you make sure the string has at least 2 characters in it, then you test if the first three characters are xhi. String.substr throws an exception if the string is not long enough. String.startsWith doesn't have this problem, it doesn't throw an exception when you check whether a 2 character string starts with 3 characters - it just returns false.


5

Great that you've found your problem. There's few more lessons you can take from this. so you now have coprime_with :: Integer -> [Integer] -> Bool coprime_with a [] = True coprime_with a (b:bs) = if ((coprime a b) == True) then (coprime_with a bs) else False whenever you see if A then B else ...


5

From the memory consumption point of view a function parameter is identical to a local vartiable. I.e. there's no difference between the two variants form the point of view of memory consumption, aside from the fact that you introduced a completely unnecessary local variable in main. However, the second variant might be less efficeint in therms of time, ...


3

The reason it's an infinite loop is because of this line: prime_sequence = [n | n <- integers, is_prime n] where is_prime n = accumulate_and (takeWhile (< n) prime_sequence) (n `is_not_dividable_by`) In order to compute is_prime n, it needs to take all the prime numbers less than n. However, in order for ...


3

The culprit is this definition: prime_sequence = [n | n <- [2,3..], is_prime n] where is_prime n = accumulate_and (takeWhile (< n) (prime_sequence)) ( n `is_not_dividable_by`) Trying to find the head element of prime_sequence (the first of the 20 to be printed by your main) leads to takeWhile needing to ...


3

try this: int sumExists(int a[], int n, int m) { if (n == 0) return m == 0; return sumExists(a, n - 1, m - a[n - 1]) || sumExists(a, n - 1, m); } The recursion checks: whether there is such a sum with the n-1 element (since calling with size n-1 and subtracting a[n-1] from m. as if to include a[n-1] in the sum m). or if there's such a ...


3

if(x=0){...} it's wrong It should be if(x==0){...} Note: if (x = 0) is the same as: x = 0; if (x)


3

You can just use the built-in max(), and a lambda key to make a handy one=liner: max(y, key=lambda x:x[-1]) This works as such: >>> y = [['a', 1], ['am', 4], ['at', 2], ['spam', 8]] >>> max(y, key=lambda x:x[-1]) ['spam', 8] >>> del(y[-1]) >>> y [['a', 1], ['am', 4], ['at', 2]] >>> max(y, key=lambda x:x[-1]) ...


2

You defined wordExists as a local variable on line 9 var wordExists = false; Take out var from the above


2

The answer is, "Learn Forth." :-) Your stack will contain instructions about what to do. So if you want 2 recursive calls, you will place 2 commands on the stack. If you have work to do, you will do that work. If you want to do 2 recursive calls and then other stuff with the result, you need to place on your stack instructions to do other stuff, then the ...


2

This: if(x=0){ is not a (pure) test, it's an assignment. It works in the if since it also has a value (zero), but it's always false so that branch is never taken, i.e. the recursion never stops. You should enable all compiler warnings, this is very commonly caught by compilers.


2

This will give you the result you are expecting: String[] test = { "la", "li", "lo" }; language(3, test, ""); private static void language(final int n, final String[] syllables, final String currentWord) { // example of N = 3 if (n == 0) { System.out.println(currentWord); } else { for (int i = 0; i < syllables.length; i++) { ...


2

You'd need something along these lines: private void recursiveMethod(int numberOfSyllablesToAdd, String[] syllables, String word) { for (int i = 0; i < syllables.length; i++) { String newWord = word + syllables[i]; if (numberOfSyllablesToAdd >= 0) { recursiveMethod(numberOfSyllablesToAdd - 1, syllables, newWord); ...


2

If I understand it correctly, in you current solution, the type of optionsSoFar is Options. The code becomes trickier if you change the type of optionsSoFar to your newly defined Result. However, I think you do not need to do that - you can keep optionsSoFar : Options and change the function to return Result. This works because you never need to call the ...


2

Your method is good, but it doesn't work for numbers that are too long. int has 4-bytes => the maximum value is 2147483647 ( 2^31-1 ), total: 2^32 values (there are also some negative numbers) long has 8-bytes => the maximum value is 9223372036854775807 ( 2^63-1 ), total: 2^64 values Those values can be found in Java using: Integer.MAX_VALUE // ...


2

Change if(x = 0) to if(0 == x) It is a good rule of hand to write 0 == x instead of x == 0 because in case of a typo like = instead of == the compiler will give an error.


2

(This answer assumes you're working in Python 2.x) You need to make the sub-directories as you go: import fnmatch import os import shutil rootPath = '/Volumes/VoigtKampff/Temp/TEST/' destDir = '/Volumes/VoigtKampff/Temp/TEST2/' matches = [] for root, dirnames, filenames in os.walk(rootPath): for filename in fnmatch.filter(filenames, '*.mp4'): ...


2

The formula is a bit tricky to implement, but this should work using a named let (this is just for avoiding the creation of another procedure): (define (function n) (let helper ((a 2)) (if (= (- a 2) n) (sqrt (+ a 4)) (sqrt (+ a 4 (* a (helper (+ a 1)))))))) If the named let bothers you, here's a completely equivalent solution, using ...


2

try substituting the value recursively T(n) = T(n/2) + Θ(1) = (T(n/4) + Θ(1)) + Θ(1) = T(n/4) + Θ(1) + Θ(1) = T(n/4) + 2*Θ(1) = (T(n/8) + Θ(1)) + 2*Θ(1)= T(n/8) + 3*Θ(1) = T(n/16) + 4*Θ(1) = T(n/32) + 5*Θ(1) [ T(n/2^5) + 5*Θ(1) ] . . = T(1) + log2(n)*Θ(1) = ...


2

Here is an initial approach please modify it accord to your need ... public static void permutationForAString(String str) { permutation("", str); } private static void permutation(String prefix, String str) { int n = str.length(); if (n == 0) System.out.println(prefix); else { for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) ...


2

It's just an over-restrictive sentence in the language definition, which says: For each value binding "pat = exp" within rec, exp must be of the form "fn match". Strictly speaking, that doesn't allow any parentheses. In practice, that's rarely a problem, because you almost always use the fun declaration syntax anyway.


2

well I believe it must be recursive function, something like expr({num,X}) -> X; expr({plus, X, Y}) -> expr(X) + expr(Y); expr({minus, X, Y}) -> expr(X) - expr(Y); expr({mul,X, Y}) -> expr(X)*expr(Y); expr(Any) -> io:format("Dont know what to do with ~p~n",[Any]).


2

This is a pretty simple method. Let me know if it doesn't make sense highest = y[0] # set the highest seen so far to the first element for item in y: # loop through all the elements if item[1] > highest[1]: # if the current items second element is higher highest = item # then set it to be the highest so far return highest Recursively: ...


1

Floating-point arithmetic is deterministic(*). You think that you are seeing an initial periodic phase which then changes to something else (“0.2, 0.4, 0.3, 0.6, 0.2”), but if you printed the values with enough precision (use the format %.16e if you are using C or a C-like language), you would see that the first “0.2” is not the same as the second “0.2”. ...


1

The clause should be: one_longer([H|T],[H2|T2]) :- one_longer(T,T2). As one_longer([T],[T2]) forms a new lists with only one element which results in the observed loop as when the rule is applied again results in continually asking one_longer([[]],[[]]) where as one_longer(T,T2) applies one_longer to the remainders of the two lists.


1

You seem to be trying to make a copy of the list with ArrayList<Integer> tempArray = newArray; but that doesn't copy the list -- it only creates another reference to it. As a result, all of the recursive calls share (and remove items from) one list, and as the list shrinks, the loops iterate fewer times. You probably want ArrayList<Integer> ...


1

Well, if there's really can't change any of the existing stuff..... I believe this is what you're looking for: How to set Vaues to the Nested Property using C# Reflection.? Your program should look something like this: class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { string mappingAddress = ...


1

It might be useful to think about your moves as part of a game tree. The basic idea is that all games start in a particular state. We'll call it x. A move then changes the state of the game to x1, the next move to x2, and so on. Most moves involve a choice and, depending on the choice made, each move pushes the game into a different state. From the starting ...


1

Since you said you want 'ways of thinking', this is one way. You start with simplest of cases by making various assumptions 1) Assume all your array elements are smaller than the destination value. -- a simple validation will help when implementation is done. High level steps You need to find out a way of obtaining all possible permutations of the ...


1

I'm not sure if your class has already covered the list monad, but I think that's the most natural way to solve this. So instead of having cardValue return a simple value, it should return a non-deterministic value that lists all the possible values that the card might have, i.e. cardValue :: Card -> [Int] cardValue Ace = [1, 11] cardValue Two = [2] ... ...



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