Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

the call tree : WriteLog("apple, ", "orange, ", "mango"); ->WriteLog("apple, "); -> std::wcout << "apple, "; ->WriteLog( "orange, ", "mango"); ->WriteLog("orange, "); -> std::wcout << "orange, "; ->WriteLog( "mango"); -> std::wcout << ...


6

if elementList[midPointOfList] > value: max = --midPointOfList return recursiveBinaryChop( value, elementList, min, max ) elif elementList[midPointOfList] < value: min = ++midPointOfList return recursiveBinaryChop( value, elementList, min, max ) Python doesn't have -- or ++ operators. If you're trying to ...


5

These two lines don't do what you think: max = --midPointOfList min = ++midPointOfList Python doesn't have this type of increment operators, but they do parse and execute successfully. ++i parses as +(+i) and --i as -(-i). Both leave i unchanged and are effectively max = midPointOfList min = midPointOfList


5

Use the + operator to get a new concatenated list: def sliding(s, k): if len(s) < k: return [] else: return [s[:k]] + sliding(s[1:], k)


4

Try with simply with two variable. public static int rec1(int n) { int result=0; int previous1=0; int previous2=0; int i=0; while(i<=n) { if(i==0 || i==1) { result=1; } else { result= previous1 + previous2 + 1; } previous2=previous1; ...


4

fac(1) returns nothing, which is undefined, and undefined*1 is NaN, that's why. Change your code to function fac(num){ return num>2 ? num*fac(num-1) : 1; }


4

int leastElement(string a[], int n) { if (n <= 0) { return -1; } if (n == 1) { return 0; } int k = 1 + leastElement(a + 1, n - 1); if (a[0] < a[k]) { return 0; } else { return k; } }


4

This problem can be solved using the tortoise and hare algorithm where you have two cursors scanning though tortoise at one cons at a time and hare at double speed starting on the second element. If the tortoise and hare is the same element you have a cycle. (defun cyclicp (list) "check if a list is cyclic using tortoise and hare algorithm" (loop :for ...


4

For a function to be tail recursive, the statement that produces the return value has to either be the final value or the function itself. The reason for this is that tail recursion sets up a trampoline where it acts as if the function had actually exited, and unwinds the call stack, but captures the values necessary for the recursive call so that it can ...


4

There is no 'a' or 'h' in the input, so it will always call return str.substring(0, 1) + FN(str.substring(1)); until the length is 0 : FN("ello") = "e" + FN("llo") = "e" + "l" + FN("lo") = .... = "ello"


3

When the recursive call to WriteLog(std::forward<Ts>(Vals)...); is finished, it has to execute the next statement. This function is called twice (once for "apple" and once for "orange") and thus two print outs of "**End**" are written. The last recursive call for "mango" goes straight to the first overload since there is only a single argument left in ...


3

It works if you replace fun(i+1,j,metric); with fun(i+1,0,metric);


3

First, 0 is a valid index, the first index in an array. If you've gone off the end of the array in your base case, return -1 instead to indicate "not found". Also, you've gone off the end of the array when index reaches data.length, not when it has passed data.length, so you need to change your if condition here. Second, your recursive call sends the same ...


3

To expand on my comment about boolean blindness, I don't just mean using another type isomorphic to 2, but rather, using the right type to encode the reason your recursive function cares about which iteration it is. Compare your code to the following version which is I'd say cleaner and more succint. It hinges on passing a Maybe Integer instead of an ...


3

You cannot return the address of an automatic variable. As WhozCraig commented, it is undefined behavior. BTW, if you enable all warnings and debug info (e.g. compile with gcc -Wall -Wextra -g if using GCC) you would have been warned. You should return a struct of two numbers, e.g. declared as struct myminmax_st { int mymin; int mymax; }; struct ...


3

Here’s a straight translation of your obj-c version: func recursiveBlockVehicle(block: (()->Void)->Void) -> ()->Void { return { block(recursiveBlockVehicle(block)) } } // test usage var i = 5 let block = recursiveBlockVehicle { recurse in if i > 0 { print("\(i--) ") recurse() } else { ...


3

You are not, in fact, using recursion at all in your answer. I think you are trying to code the formula nCk = (n-1)C(k-1) + (n-1)Ck. You need, therefore, to call combination from within itself (with a guard for the "end" conditions: nC0 = nCn = 1): def combination(n, k): if k == 0 or k == n: return 1 return combination(n - 1, k - 1) + ...


3

Your error is indeed a StackOverflow caused by too much recursion, but Processing covers that up with the strange error you're seeing. Documentation on that bug is here. You can increase the Java stack size to increase the limit of recursive calls. Info can be found here, but the gist is that you have to pass the -Xss setting into Java at runtime. However, ...


3

You've got the recursion itself right, with a base case and a recursive case, and a correct reduction of the parameter in the recursive call (except that, as the commenters have noted, you also need to specify the height of the new rectangle). It's only the geometry that needs fixing: height doesn't change during the recursion; what is the area of the base ...


3

Here is a simple logically pure implementation of list_oddies/2: The relations list_oddies/2 and skipHead_oddies/2 are defined mutually recursive. Both use first-argument indexing to avoid the creation of useless choicepoints. list_oddies([],[]). list_oddies([X|Xs],[X|Ys]) :- skipHead_oddies(Xs,Ys). skipHead_oddies([],[]). skipHead_oddies([_|Xs],Ys) ...


3

Let's start right in the middle: }else{ /* if AST already has elements in it. */ tmp = AST; tmp -> left = tmp-> right = NULL; AST->datum = atol(argv[i]); AST->right = create_node(stack->datum); stack = pop(stack); AST->left = tmp; /*This puts the new operator as the root of the ...


3

The idea is to add the current element of the series to the rest of the series (which you get from the recursive call) : public static double m(int x) { if (x==1) return .5; else return (double)x/(x+1) + m(x-1); } Note that the casting to double is important, since without it you'll be doing int division, which will return 0.


3

This is what you were looking for: The recursive part here is to get the value for a particular value for i, and then recursively call for i-1. public static double resursiveSum(int x) { if (x == 1) { return .5; } else { return ((double)x / (double)(x + 1)) + resursiveSum(x - 1); } }


3

Instead of return, you should add it to the alist as like below. def combine(a, b): alist = [] if a == [] and b == []: return alist if a != [] and b == []: return alist + a if a == [] and b != []: return alist + b if a != [] and b != []: if a[0] <= b[0]: alist.append(a[0]) alist = alist ...


3

Change this System.out.print(reversDigits(9876548)); to reversDigits(9876548);


3

For this case: if(S[x] == S[y]) ret = solve(x+1,y-1,val+2 - (x==y)); it should be: if(S[x] == S[y]) ret = max(solve(x + 1, y - 1, val + 2 - (x==y)), max(solve(x + 1, y, 0),solve(x, y - 1, 0))); Because, in case you cannot create a substring from x to y, you need to cover the other two cases. Another bug: if(ret!=0){ret = val + ret;return ...


3

Solution without recursion, just small play on slice syntax. def sliding(s, i): return [s[n:n+i] for n in xrange(len(s)-i+1)] assert sliding("python", 2) == ["py", "yt", "th", "ho", "on"] assert sliding("python", 3) == ["pyt", "yth", "tho", "hon"]


2

I like async.queue for this type of workload. You get trivially-adjustable concurrency for free, but it's always easiest to debug with concurrency 1. var mysql = require("mysql"); // concurrency 1. Adjust to taste once it's working var queue = require("async").queue(secondQuery, 1); var dbOptions = { host: process.env.DOCKER_IP, database: "hoosteeno", ...


2

The main culprit is: return find(start + 5, "(" + history + " + 5)") || find(start * 3, "(" + history + " * 3)"); Lets assume start is equal to 1 and, like with your code, our target is 13. find() is called with our 1 to begin with. Lets call this Find A. find() gets to the snippet above and is triggered again with a new start value of 1 + 5 ...


2

Here is an alternative to think about since you are investigating recursion. If you switch the order of the append and the recursive call, then you don't have to reverse the list at the end. This lets the recursion defer the MSB until after the LSBs have already been handled. In the end it does the same thing, but with less complication. def dec2bin(n): ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible