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8

I think this has nothing to do with being purely functional, it is just a design decision that in Haskell you are not allowed to do let a = 0;; let a = a + 1;; whereas you can do it in Caml. In Haskell this code won't work because let a = a + 1 is interpreted as a recursive definition and will not terminate. In Haskell you don't have to specify that a ...


7

You have a copy and paste problem: your code snippet uses fancy quotes (“) instead of normal ones (") and Haskell doesn't know how to parse it. In the error message, "lexical error" means that there is a problem with your syntax; specifically, it doesn't know what to do with the character '\8220' which is the ASCII representation of “. Assuming your ...


7

When you define a semantics of function definition, as a language designer, you have choices: either to make the name of the function visible in the scope of its own body, or not. Both choice are perfectly legal, for example C-family languages being far from functional, still do have names of definitions visible in their scope (this also extends to all ...


6

how many calls will be stored in stack for the recursive method below and why? With an input of 50, the max amount of stack frames at any given moment, including the initial call to fib, will be 50. (So there will be at most 49 recursive calls stored on the stack at any given moment). The reason there can be at most 50 stack frames is: The initial call ...


6

Here's a hint. Modify your code with a print statement as in the example below: int fibonacci(int i, int stack) { printf("Fib: %d, %d\n", i, stack); if (i == 0) return 0; if (i == 1) return 1; return fibonacci(i - 1, stack + 1) + fibonacci(i - 2, stack + 1); } Now execute this line in main: Fibonacci(6,1); What's the highest value for ...


5

allEven((number / 10), &result); should be replaced with allEven((number / 10), result); Because allEven expects second argument of type int * and &result is int ** Also int *result should be int result = 1 Working example here If you compile with proper warning flags -W -Wall for example on gcc (better with -O2), you should get proper warnings ...


5

That code is not recursive per se, quite the contrary, it uses continuation passing to eliminate tail calls. Here's an example without setTimeout: // naive, direct recursion function sum_naive(n) { return n == 0 ? 0 : n + sum_naive(n-1); } try { sum_naive(50000) } catch(e) { document.write(e + "<br>") } // use CPS to ...


4

If you're only interested in inputs of the form a / 2b, then it might help to define something like G(a, b) = F(a / 2b) With this in mind notice that since F(0) = 0 and F(1) = 1, we have that G(0, 0) = 0 G(1, 0) = 1 Now, since F(x) = 0.25 F(2x) (if x ≤ 0.5) we see that G(a, b) = 0.25 G(a, b - 1) (if b > 0 and a ≤ 2b-1) ...


4

Java 8 has no Tail Call Optimization whatsoever. No calls will be optimized (turned into iteration/goto statements). The discussion over TCO for Java has a long history, though, with Guy Steele being one of its best-known proponents. I recommend reading this post from the mlvm-dev mailing list for a recent review of the subject.


4

removeFirst p xs = [] This always returns the empty list and it matches all arguments. I think you mean this. removeFirst _ [] = []


4

The example you provided does not have any tail recursion. Consider: (function loop(i) { setTimeout(function main() { alert("Hello World!"); if (i > 1) loop(i - 1); }, 3000); }(3)); I've given the inner function the name main and the outer function the name loop. The loop function is immediately invoked with the ...


4

If you just need all possible sums then you can use this function. public static IEnumerable<int> GetSums(List<int> list) { return from m in Enumerable.Range(0, 1 << list.Count) select (from i in Enumerable.Range(0, list.Count) where (m & (1 << i)) != 0 select ...


4

Sums from subsets are in direct correspondence with subsets, which are also in direct correspondence with binary sequences. If you have five items in your set, you want to iterate over all bit sequences from 00000 to 11111. Equivalently, you want to iterate from 0 to 2^5-1. If a bit is set to one, you should include the value in the sum. So, something like ...


3

when 'c==\n', it will be the end of the recursion, the function will not call itself any further and return to the last call, which continues on the line of 'printf("%c", c)', thus printing the last char of the string, then return to the second last call and so on..


3

The problem is in that function declaration int &maxim is before int &minim and in the recursive call you put minimum value first. So you need to call: findMaxMin(A, firstIndex, (lastIndex-1), myMax, myMin, false); The way you structured your code also firstIndex can only be 0. So you can remove this parameter and replace with 0. Also isFirst ...


3

A copy of the path so far is created and passed in the first recursive call so that further entries can be added to the path. We do not need to pass it in the second call as whatever entries will be added as a result of second call are part of the first call's path.


3

You should write it down this way to compile the code: void allEven(int number, int *result) { if ((number % 10) % 2) // if the last digit is odd { *result = 0; } else { *result = 1; if ((number / 10) != 0) //not the last digit to evaluate, we call the function again. { allEven((number / 10), ...


3

I have found a solution : module B (SomeI : I) : (* introduce a recursive module Implementation *) module rec Implementation : A with type t = SomeI.t = struct type t = SomeI.t (* use Implementation here *) module Impl = ComplexImpl(Implementation) val basic_func (x : t) = ... val complex_func (x ...


3

Yes, foo() is a recursive function that results in an infinite loop. If your compiler optimizes tail recursion, then it will likely chug along until you kill it. If your compiler doesn't optimize tail recursion then you will eventually overflow your stack and/or run out of memory.


3

compiling and disassembling the function you should get a disassembly similar to this 0:000> cdb: Reading initial command 'uf fact!fact;q' fact!fact: 00401000 55 push ebp 00401001 8bec mov ebp,esp 00401003 837d0801 cmp dword ptr [ebp+8],1 00401007 7507 jne fact!fact+0x10 (00401010) fact!fact+0x9: ...


3

You are not returning: return binSearch(arr, i, lower, idx) You also need to return in your conditions: def binSearch(arr, i, lower=0, upper=None): if upper is None: upper = len(arr)+1 idx = (lower+upper)//2 if arr[idx] == i: print(idx, arr[idx],'\n') return idx # return 3/idx elif arr[idx] != i and ...


3

Python runs each call in the order it encounters the instruction to call it. So, starting at the top of fac with n=6, it will get to this line: x=fac(n-1)+fac(n-2)+fac(n-3) The first thing it will do is to calculate n-1=5, and run fac(5) - which starts again at the top of the function. It will reach the same place and call fac(4), which will call fac(3) - ...


3

I am not an expert, but I'll make a guess until the truly knowledgable guys show up. In OCaml there can be side effects that happen during the definition of a function: let rec f = let () = Printf.printf "hello\n" in fun x -> if x <= 0 then 12 else 1 + f (x - 1) This means that the order of function definitions must be preserved in some ...


2

Only thing is you need to return the getRandomAlphabet method (function() { var getAlphabet = function() { var alphabet = []; for ( var asciiCode = 97; asciiCode < 123; asciiCode++ ) { alphabet.push(String.fromCharCode(asciiCode)); } return alphabet; }; var getRandomAlphabet = function(alphabet, randomAlphabet) { var ...


2

One of the cool things about Python is that iterators are just a normal datatype. Although one usually uses for loops and comprehensions to iterate, there is nothing to stop you from doing the iteration manually if that is convenient. One reason it might be convenient is to avoid deep recursion, by replacing it with an explicit stack. While this does "take ...


2

The problem in your tree traversal is that you certainly process the tree until you find a node pointer which is NULL. Unfortunately when you create the nodes, these are not initialized neither with malloc() nor with new (it would be initialized with calloc() but this practice in cpp code is as bad as malloc()). So your traversal continues to ...


2

You may not be properly setting the children of n when the condition does not hold. You might want this instead: void set_root_and_build() { root.data = ...; build(&root,...); // ... part are values of data for it's child } void build(Node *n,...) { n->child1 = n->child2 = NULL; Node *new1, *new2; new1 = (Node*) ...


2

Your first equation, removeFirst p xs = [] says „Whatever my arguments are, just return []“, and the rest of the code is ignored. You probably mean removeFirst p [] = [] saying „When the list is already empty, return the empty list.“


2

Change append to extend when you do the recursion. Since you return a list, you want to extend the current list you have, not append another inner list. def split_path(s): tup=[] i=s.find("/") if i!=-1: tup.append(s[0:i]) new_str=s[i+1:] tup.extend(split_path(new_str)) else: tup.append(s) return tup ...


2

You have to retrieve each possible permutations with MySQL and using LEFT JOIN on the 4th table and testing if there is no match If you have 3 tables t1, t2, t3 containing one column "value", and table t4 which is the "permutation" which contains three columns t1, t2 and t3, you can get the non existing "permutation" with the following query SELECT ...



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