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1

Probably easiest to just post a function that does the job with plenty of comments. The recursive part is near the bottom, in the function passed to every: // Helper to return a value's internal object [[Class]] // That this returns [object Type] even for primitives function getClass(obj) { return Object.prototype.toString.call(obj); } /* ** @param a, b ...


0

With GCC you can add a runtime check using the backtrace() function: #include <cassert> #include <iostream> #include <execinfo.h> size_t start; size_t stack_frames() { void *array[16]; size_t size = backtrace(array, 16); // std::cout << "Obtained " << size << " stack frames.\n"; return size; } bool ...


0

I assume your code is missing getNthFromLast(list *node_ptr, int n) { right at the top. (!!) Your recursive version keeps track of node_ptrs in its call stack frames, so it is essentially non tail-recursive. Moreover, it continues to unwind the stack (go back up the stack of call frames), while incrementing the i and still checking its equality to n, ...


0

Clearly the function train is calling to the function done, which is calling again the function train. Then the function train increments the index i until its value is bigger than the data.length, calling again the done function


1

You might tackle this problem in a different location. Your packages and dependencies is basically a graph, where the packages are vertices and the dependencies are edges. Your approach is basically doing a DFS on this graph, which is fine, and can find the depth of each package (though if it's not a tree - you might find a depth which is not the shortest ...


-1

netTwo is not defined. nTwo is a parameter in the function and used in the first if clause. But the else if clause has an undefined variable named "netTwo." I therefore would expect a problem.


2

You are using the post-increment operator (i++), which returns the current value before incrementing the variable. In other words, you always call you function with the same i. Using the pre-incremenet (++i) instead should solve the issue: else (new Trainer(n)).workerTrain([data[i]], train(++i, trainingSet, l, y));


0

You seem to be looking to implement depth-first search. The wiki article even provides some pseudo code which you can use to implement the algorithm. Note that this will mark all reachable squares, but will not print out all (redundant) moves unless you modify the algorithm.


0

Here's the recursive solution based on your original implementation. import java.util.TreeSet; public class RecursiveSplit { public static TreeSet<String> getWordSet(String sentence, TreeSet<String> mySet) { int index = sentence.indexOf(" "); if (index < 0) if (sentence.length()>0) index = ...


0

I'll only address your dynamic programming as an exercise here, note that this kind of solution is not a good approach for solving your task. In each invocation of your method, you are instantiating a new Set, which you will eventually throw away, and just return the very first one, which contains the first word. You will need to create the collection ...


0

private static TreeSet<String> result = new TreeSet<String>(); public static TreeSet<String> getWordSet(String words) { int index = words.indexOf(" "); if (index < 0 && words != null) { return result; } else if (index < 0 && words.length() > 0) { result.add(words); } else { result = ...


1

You should add result of returned value of your recursion function to your result set,(also you didnt consider the last word), something like this(I give explanation in the comments) public static TreeSet<String> getWordSet(String words) { TreeSet<String> result = new TreeSet<String>(); int index = words.indexOf(" "); if ...


0

Take care of the scopes. Your TreeSet is a local variable, It is getting over-written every time you call the function with a new one. Try declaring it as a global variable outside the function.


1

In Haskell, the two-finger solution seems to be the obvious way. This version will go wrong in various ways if the requested element isn't present. I'll leave it as an exercise for you to fix that (hint: write versions of drop and last that return Maybe values, and then string the computations together with >>=). Note that this takes the last element ...


0

Just keep it as simple as possible, and you are free to go. First of all, we know there must be a function nthFromLast, which receives the last node from your list, and an integer. Node * nthFromLast(Node *last, int n); Now, we need to declare the possibilities, from simplest to the most generic cases: Node * nthFromLast(Node *last, int n) { // If n ...


2

The linked page explains how to solve the problem with a two-finger solution; it's a bit surprising that they don't simply write the recursive version, which would be simple and clear. (In my experience, you don't succeed at interviews by providing tricky and obscure code when there is a simple and clear version which is equally efficient. But I suppose ...


0

The typical iterative strategy uses two pointers and runs one to n - 1 before starting to move the other. With recursion, we can instead use the stack to count back up from the end of the list by adding a third argument. And to keep the usage clean, we can make a static helper function (in this sense it means only visible within compilation unit, a totally ...


0

here is a way to create a new list of lists: Essentially opposite order. (define envers (lambda (lat) (cond ((null? lat) '()) (else (list (envers (cdr lat)) (car lat) )) ) ) )


7

As this exercise is about the List Monad, try to not think of what you know about lists, but limit yourself to the structure of monads. So that would be move :: Monad m => Pos -> m Pos That is, move takes a Pos and gives you back something that is about Pos things in some monadic context m. (In the case of lists, the "context" being "arbitrary ...


3

Using direct recursion: inNMoves :: KnightPos -> Int -> [KnightPos] inNMoves start 0 = return start inNMoves start n = do first <- moveKnight start inNMoves first (n - 1) But as mentioned in the comments: you can use built-in functions for this. For example: inNMoves start n = (foldl (>>=) . return) start (replicate n moveKnight) Or ...


3

Note that concatMap moveKnight has type [Knight] -> [Knight] and will return the positions reachable from the input positions. Knowing that, you can use: iterate (concatMap moveKnight) to generate an infinite list of sets of positions where the next set of positions is obtained by making a knight move from a position in the previous set. For example: ...


0

The formula for summation of a Geometric Series for elements a, ar, ar^2,...,ar^n-1 is given by S(n) = a((r^n)-1)/(r-1) // in case of r>1 The subproblem size for for a node at a depth i is n/(2^i). Thus, the subproblem hits size 1 when n/(2^i) = 1, or equivalently, when i=log2n. Each level has 2 times more nodes than the level above, and so the ...


0

From root to leaf, each level of the tree sees n halves, thus the tree has log2(n) levels. The sum would then be: n + 2n + ... + 2 ^ (log2(n)) * n = n * (1 + 2 + ... + 2 ^ log2(n)) = n * (2 ^ (log2(n) + 1) - 1) = n * (2 * n - 1) = 2 * n ^ 2 - n = O(n ^ 2) All the analysis above assumes n is a power of 2, but as in the majority of the cases, the ...


1

Say, your example above looks like: package main import "fmt" type Foo struct { // here must be reentrant mutex Value int } var F Foo func A() { F.Value += 1 if F.Value < 10 { A() } } func B() { F.Value += 5 if F.Value < 20 { A() } } func main() { F = Foo{ Value: 0, } A() ...


7

No, there is no way to tell a compiler that tail recursion is required. Some compilers (none that I'm aware of) may support implementation-specific annotations, but that requires the user to use that specific compiler. Some other compilers, in some modes, intentionally never support tail calls, because they can provide a better debugging experience by not ...


2

Try this: with cte as( select * from t where id = 5 union all select t.id, t.name, t.pid from cte c join t on c.pid = t.id) select replace(stuff((select '-' + name from cte order by id for xml path('')), 1, 1, ''), '-', '->') Fiddle http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/6fdde1/19


0

Thinking recursively can be hard. See my answer to the question "Prolog programming - path way to a solution" for links to good resources on how to think recursively. For instance, most recursive problems can be broken down into a few (1 or 2) special cases, and then, the general case. In your case — computing the sum of a list of numbers — one ...


0

You can include a custom element inside of itself: my-recursive.html <link rel="import" href="../polymer/polymer.html"> <dom-module id="my-recursive"> <template> <template is="dom-repeat" items="{{data}}"> <section id="{{item.id}}" appName="{{item.id}}"> <my-recursive ...


0

The only part I am not sure is how to get the first step, so I can pass that info to my monster move function. Here is the program that I wrote so far. A possible way would be to return a code for the next step from the function if the path exists, otherwise 0 (although this might not be a recommended way for readable code, but just to propose the idea) ...


3

Your algorithm works well. The only thing missing is to restore the '.' in pathExist() if the tested path is not successful : ... if(pathExists(maze, sr, sc + 1, er, ec, distance + 1)) return true; maze[sr][sc] = '.'; //<=========== add this to restore the maze state return false; } Without this line, your failed ...


0

The following code is from SQL tips for DB2, written by Serge Rielau CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION Fib(n INTEGER) RETURNS DECIMAL(31, 0) BEGIN DECLARE res DECIMAL(31, 0); CASE WHEN n = 0 THEN SET res = 0; WHEN n = 1 THEN SET res = 1; WHEN n > 1 THEN BEGIN DECLARE stmt STATEMENT; ...


2

How does one develop an intuition to think about a solution to problems of this type? The solution is very clever and quite specific to the problem, but it is also an example of a more general problem-solving strategy called divide and conquer. Instead of attacking the problem in full, create smaller versions of it and try to solve them, eg. with pencil ...


0

Create a dictionary that saves the results of the function and then check to see if that value is in the dict before calling the function again. Something similar to this should work depending on your setup. results = {} for value in values: if results.get(value): answer = results[value] else: answer = basis(value) ...


1

It's very easy to memoize anything using functools.lru_cache in Python3, or, in Python2.7 using something like this: class Bspline(object): ... # Python2.7 @memoize # or, Python3* @functools.lru_cache() def op(self, args): return self._internal_op(xi)


0

`Dim FileSystem As Object Dim HostFolder As String HostFolder = "C:\" Set FileSystem = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject") DoFolder FileSystem.GetFolder(HostFolder) Sub DoFolder(Folder) Dim SubFolder For Each SubFolder In Folder.SubFolders DoFolder SubFolder Next Dim File For Each File In Folder.Files ' Operate ...


1

A general "good" explanation is not possible, because a good explanation needs to link to the previous knoledgment of the person. I'm going, by example, assume you are able to made a "proof by induction". Step1: Let start by the initial fact, "the sum of a set with a single element is the element itself". In prolog: sum([A],A). Step2: if the sum of a set ...


8

You cannot do: return ((temp,xz) : gainData xc) The gainData function returns an IO [something] not just [something]. You have to first extract the value returned: res <- gainData xc return $ (temp,xz) : res The varname <- action does the following: It calls action, which in this case its gainData xc. This action returns an IO something It ...


0

Just move the recursive call to the request's callback, to not hurt the stack i++; // increment the counter request(url, function(error, response, html){ if (i < ids.length) { // if the counter < ids.length, call the loop function myLoop(); // .. again which will trigger another } // ... ...


0

Here is a code which is generic and be used for any such recursive problems : import java.util.Stack; public class IterativePermutations { static int perm_cnt = 0; class stack_node { int ret_pos; int iter; String prefix; String current_str; } private Stack<stack_node> perm_stack = new ...


9

Since you have a recursive type in there, you need to declare it explicitly: data T a = L [a] | F (a -> T a) (+>) (F f) = f unL (L x) = x eat xs x = if x == "vomit" then L $ reverse xs else F $ eat (x:xs) eaten = unL $ eat [""] "x" +> "y" +> "z" +> "vomit" {- *Main> eaten ["","x","y","z"] -} Defining eaten1 = eat [""] "x" +> "y" ...


0

Your problem is that if useColor comes back as false, it doesn't set a color for the current country, but still tries to recursively color the rest of the map. As an example, we first try and color the first country (country 0) with color 1, which succeeds. We then try and color country 1 with color 1, which fails because it is adjacent to country 0 which ...


0

You are correct, you need to traverse the tree, which can be elegantly achieved in SML by using pattern matching. You will want to case on the input tree, if it is Empty then simply return Empty. If it is a Node, then you will want to recursively convert the left and right subtrees and place those results into the other representation. This shouldn't ...


2

You can leverage PCRE regex power of capturing groups in look-aheads and subroutines to get the nested {...} substrings. A regex demo is available here. $re = "#(?=(\{(?>[^{}]|(?1))*+\}))#"; $str = "Hello {#name}! I'm a {%string|sentence|bit of {#random} text}"; preg_match_all($re, $str, $matches, PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE); print_r($matches[1]); See ...


0

You should indeed switch to setInterval() in this case. The problem with setInterval() is that you either have to keep a reference if you ever want to clear the timeout and in case the operation (possibly) takes longer to perform than the timeout itself the operation could be running twice. For example if you have a function running every 1s using ...


1

First thing, change this: public LinkedList tokenize (String expression) {...} to this: public LinkedList<String> tokenize (String expression) {...} And change this: public Parser(LinkedList tokens) {...} to this: public Parser(LinkedList<Token> tokens) {...} LinkedList (without a generic part) is called a raw type and facilitates an ...


0

I think you should redefine your class. let's have a unique class public class Node { public Node Parent { get; private set; } //additional properties etc... public string Name { get; set;} public int Value {get; set;} public Node(Node parent) { Parent = parent; } } so now any Node instance has a parent property, if it is null then ...


0

You need to declare the getList variable before you define it for this to work, change def getList = { sep, list -> To def getList getList = { sep, list ->


1

This function is typically not considered tail-recursive, because it involves multiple recursive calls to foo. Tail recursion is particularly interesting because it can be trivially rewritten (for example by a compiler optimization) into a loop. It is not possible to completely eliminate recursion with this tail-call-optimization technique in your example, ...


5

Issues: concatenation operator in Oracle is ||, not +, level is reserved word, in Oracle there is not function replicate, in table definition you used parent, in code: parentID, not sure why you used cast ... as varchar(1000), here I replaced it with substr. Version of your recursive query working in Oracle: with categorytree (id, title, lvl, parent, ...


1

From deletefront() you should return new head i.e head->next. head deletefront(head h) { head temp; // create a temporary node temp = h; // transfer the address of 'head' to 'temp' h = temp->next; // transfer the address of 'temp->next' to 'head' return h; } And you ...



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