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4

Yes they do run the same. Best practice for every syntactic sugar is the same: use it whenever it provides more readable or flexible code. In your examples in case of if statement you may omit braces and write just def myThing(a: Int): Int = if (a > 0) a else myThing(a + 1) Which is definitely more handy than pattern matching. Pattern matching is ...


0

You can simply return a concatenated list for each recursive call, which combines the current key, the left subtree and the right subtree: def preorder(tree): if tree: return ([tree.key] + preorder(tree.getLeftChild()) + preorder(tree.getRightChild())) return []


2

The problem is you put too much in the printing loops: for(int j = 1; j <= i; j++) { cout << '*'; cout << endl; } Should be: for(int j = 1; j <= i; j++) { cout << '*'; } cout << endl; Loops without curly braces can only contain a single statement. This means the ...


1

I see 3 problems within your code, let me first explain the problems in your code before showing a working solution. First off: if(str[0]=='\0'){ return FALSE; } Why would a empty string not be sorted? Which elements are out of order? After all it's empty. Next you don't handle upper/lower case correctly: if(strcmp(&str[0],&str[1])<0) ...


1

The correct is_sorted function in your program should look like this: #include <ctype.h> #include <stdio.h> Bool is_sorted(const char *str){ if(str[0]=='\0'){ return TRUE; //the string is empty } else if(str[1]=='\0'){ return TRUE; //the string contains only one character or all letters before NULL are in correct ...


1

The answer given by @JayKominek is spot-on and fixes the error in your code. To complement it, here's an alternative implementation: (define (rev-digits n) (let loop ((n n) (acc '())) (if (< n 10) (cons n acc) (loop (quotient n 10) (cons (modulo n 10) acc))))) The advantages of the above code are: It's tail recursive and hence ...


1

rev-digits needs to call itself, not digits. (define (rev-digits n) (if (= n 0) '() (cons (modulo n 10) (rev-digits (quotient n 10))))) (define (digits n) (reverse (rev-digits n))) should work. It's worth noting that your "random" output was not in fact random; rather the digits were "bouncing" back and forth from the start to the end of the ...


3

Are you sure you want tree.self.key and not simply tree.key when you print? Otherwise, a solution with yield from (Python 3.3+): def preorder(tree): if tree: yield tree yield from preorder(tree.getLeftChild()) yield from preorder(tree.getRightChild()) Or with simple yield: def preorder(tree): if tree: yield tree ...


1

You can add second argument to preorder function, something like def preorder(tree, visnodes): if tree: visnodes.append(tree.self.key) print(tree.self.key) preorder(tree.getLeftChild(), visnodes) preorder(tree.getRightChild(), visnodes) ... vn = [] preorder(tree, vn)


1

You have to actually return a value from the recursive function (currently, it's just printing values). And you should build the list as you go, and maybe clean the code up a bit - something like this: def preorder(tree): if not tree: return [] # optionally, you can print the key in this line: print(self.key) return [tree.key] + ...


0

your recursive equation is two(n) = 7 , n == 0 = SUM( two(i) )[i=0..n-1] , n > 0 writing out few terms in the sequence, starting from 0, we get two(n)[n=0,1..] = 7, 7, 14, 28, 56, ... your recurrence equation is then two(n) = 7 , n <= 1 = two(n-1) * 2 , n > 1 The closed form ...


2

two(0) = 7 two(i) = two(0) + two(1) + ... + two(i-1) two(i) = Σ(Two(i)) with i = 0 to n-1 I hope this helps. This is the steps you should follow to get a recursive equation. Example:two(3) two(3) = two (2) + two(1) + two(0) two(2) = two(1) + two(0) two(1) = two(0) two(0) = 7 two(1) = 7 two(2) = 7 + 7 two(3) = 7 + 7 + (7 + 7) = 28


0

Idea is very simple, you can add an element to anyone of the three sets(S1 or S2 or S3). Using the function fn the coder is doing that basically.Look for an element denoted ny ptr (element is a[ptr]) it is either added to first(i),second(j) or last(k). The maximum of which is given as output. Actually all the possibilities of adding an element to any of the ...


1

"the printf() at the end must be encountered only once" that's incorrect. you enter main() five times, so you will exit it 5 times. Each invocation of main() enters a new copy of it, opening a new stack frame for it. When the next invocation has printed its value and exited, the control returns to the previous invocation, at the point after the recursive ...


1

The printf statement is not within the if. Each (recursive) call to main will ultimately call printf before terminating.


-1

You should read the logic of recursion again i guess.. When the function is called from inside that function only, that presently executing function and all its parameters are pushed into the stack, and the newly called function starts executing. As this function calls gets over, the execution returns to the previous function (by popping it from the stack), ...


0

Hmm ... not sure exactly what you mean, but here's a guess. First get rid of that nasty n^2 by making the transformation f(n) = g(n) + (an^2 + bn + c). Doing the algebra so that the n^2, n, and constant terms cancel we have f(n) = g(n) - (n^2 + 10n + 37) where g(n) satisfies the nicer recurrence g(n) = g(n-2) + g(n-3). We can solve for g(n) by matrix ...


0

In this case dynamic programming approach would do the job - start from the bottom up when n == 0 and store results of sequential values of n in an array. Something like that (it is pseudocode): for(int i = 0; i <=n ;++i) if( i < 3) arr[i]=i; else arr[i] = 3 * arr[i-1] + 2 * arr[i-2] + arr[i-3] return arr[n];


2

A recursive method is one that calls itself. Also, you can't call a non-static method without an instance of the class. You could write an iterative version like, public static void countIterative(int from, int to) { for (; from <= to; from++) { System.out.printf("%d ", from); } } and a recursive version like public static void ...


2

Try this: public class RecursionStack { public static String countIterative(int from, int to) { // the following if is your base case // and it is from here that you can stop // performing recursion if (from == to) { return " " + to;} else { // this else is default and is the basis of the "recursiveness" of ...


0

You don't seem to be visiting the right sub child. Change result = getPath(root.getLeftChild(),toFind, path + '1'); to result = getPath(root.getRightChild(),toFind, path + '1');


0

The merge method appears to be implemented incorrectly. The following version is based on the API docs, but it is untested : public static ArrayList<Integer> merge(ArrayList<Integer> list1,ArrayList<Integer> list2) { if (list1.size() == 0) { merge = list2; // ... an empty first list means to return the second one else if ...


2

Your maze is 50*50. Looking into your move method, I can't see anything that stops you from falling out of the maze (i.e. moving to an index larger than 49 or lower than 0). More generally, If you want to use recursion, and you don't want to end up in trouble, you must check for when you're done. Your move method will never stop calling itself, so think ...


0

If using Fx4 and above the EnumerateFiles method will return all files with efficient memory management, whereas GetFiles can require max resources on big directories (or drives). var files = Directory.EnumerateFiles(dir.Path, "*.*");


0

Thank You tomse!!!!!!!! the parameter count is actually the size of the array so i changed it a little to private int recursiveGetIndexOfLargest( int[] list, int count ) { int index; int temp = count - 1; if( temp == 0 ) { return temp; } else { index = recursiveGetIndexOfLargest(list, temp); return ...


1

Try this one: int recursiveGetIndexOfLargest(int[] list, int count) { if (count == list.length - 1) return count; int index = recursiveGetIndexOfLargest(list, count + 1); return list[count] > list[index] ? count : index; } int[] arr = {1, 5, 2, 3, 0}; System.out.println(recursiveGetIndexOfLargest(arr, 0));


0

Get rid of TOP 1 and do it like this. If you have repeat values, add a group by to your anchor query or DISTINCT DECLARE @QID TABLE (val VARCHAR(100)); INSERT INTO @QID VALUES ('user1'),('user2') WITH empList(mgrQID, QID, NTID, FullName, lvl, countOfDirects) AS ( SELECT mgrQID, QID, NTID, FirstName+' '+LastName, 0, CountOfDirects FROM ...


3

The following code: getTreeString(root.getLeftChild()); getTreeString(root.getRightChild()); should be treeString += getTreeString(root.getLeftChild()); treeString += getTreeString(root.getRightChild()); You do not append your results to treeString.


0

int findLargestIndex(int[] array, int currentPos, int currentLargestIndex) { if(currentPos == array.length) return currentLargestIndex; if(array[currentPost] > array[currentLargestIndex] return findLargestIndex(array,currentPos+1, currentPos); else return findLargestIndex(array,currentPos+1, currentLargestIndex); } It is ...


0

Thanks to @Alex's answer I managed to come up with a working lazy solution: ;; Helper function for marking mutiples of a number as 0 (defn mark [[x :as xs] k m] (lazy-seq (when-not (empty? xs) (if (= k m) (cons 0 (mark (rest xs) 1 m)) (cons x (mark (rest xs) (inc k) m)))))) ;; Sieve of Eratosthenes (defn sieve [[x :as xs]] ...


0

I am pursuing a solution that: reads DB recursively accumulates rows read from DB in a PHP structure provides that structure back to the caller in a nice array Caller than runs iterative algo to print HTML with values from array, and, separately sums pricing info. Voila! --- code possibly to be added after it is is written- - (it's basically same ...


3

There are a couple of issues here. First, as pointed out in the other answer, your mark and sieve functions don't have terminating conditions. It looks like they are designed to work with infinite sequences, but if you passed a finite-length sequence they'd keep going off the end. The deeper problem here is that it looks like you're trying to have a ...


2

Need terminating conditions The problem here is both your mark and sieve functions have no terminating conditions. There must be some set of inputs for which each function does not call itself, but returns an answer. Additionally, every set of (valid) inputs to these functions should eventually resolve to a non-recursive return value. But even if you get ...


0

That would be indeed very complicated. First of all, as your tree code runs async you need to either provide a success callback/resolve a promise/return a future or something else, so that you can control when the Meteor method returns. Then you need to use Futures to defer the return of the method util you have your result. But even then I don't see how ...


0

Not a fully finish solution in sass, but here is a css solution, and in the comments is a work in progress sass solution to your issue. http://codepen.io/sp90/pen/eNOZZz HTML: <ul> <li>ho</li> <li>ho</li> <li>ho <ul> <li>foo</li> <li>foo</li> ...


2

Try this: private static String startStar(int n) { if (n==0) { return "*"; } else { return startStar(n-1)+startStar(n-1); } }


-1

You could try out this: private static String star(int n){ if (n==0){ return "*"; } else { if(n-1 > 0){ return("**"+star(n-1)); }else{ return"**"; } } }


1

For any n > 0 you always return "**", and just ignore the result of star(n) call, which is wrong. The correct version would be: private static String star(int n) { if (n==0) { String b ="*"; return b; } else { String t = star(n-1); return t + t; } }


0

Because you put your puts statement inside your method, it will print out the value of the random guess on every invocation, whether it was 0 or not. A method calling itself recursively will only break control flow at that point temporarily, until it moves back up the stack. What you want to do is have the method return the first value that is not 0. ...


0

Maybe use a file filter where you check the memory consumption and return true | false whether you want to accept the file. Then you dont need to add that choice in the route. See the filter option at http://camel.apache.org/file2


4

This is because only the output of i++ is the same as i + 1. But when you use i++ you also assign the value to i. so var i = 0; output i++; // 1 output i; // still 1 var i = 0; output i + 1; // 1 output i; // 0


5

i+1 means "return value that is one larger than i, don't change i" i++ means "increment i by one, but return the original value" ++i means "increment i by one and return the incremented value" So in this case if you use i+1 you're not changing the value of i, but you're sending a value one larger than i as an argument. You could also use the ++i, if you ...


10

i++ increments a number and returns the old value. This means effectively that you're passing i everywhere instead of i + 1. It's better to just pass i + 1 since that's the value you're asking for - but ++i will also work.


0

# closer to your original design # fyi, returns values 1 - 3 def guess random_guess = 0 while random_guess == 0 random_guess = get_random_guess(4) end random_guess end def get_random_guess(max_guess) rand(4) end # test guess 100 times (1..100).each { puts "guess=#{guess}" } # faster, note the use of rand without a max parameter. # in ...


0

Because it recursive. in maintain a stack of each remaining instruction. Say if 0 comes, it will add puts random_guess line in stack. and after finishing of recursive guess call, it pop out the remaining instructions. So it printing 0 till many recursive call of guess.


0

It's doing exactly what you told it to. If you get a non-zero, you don't enter the if-clause, so you immediately print the non-zero and are done. However, if the first value you generate is zero, you enter the recursion and repeat the process until a non-zero value is produced. Only then do you bypass the if to encounter the print statement and return ...


2

When random_guess is 0, guess calls itself recursively, this is working correctly. The output you see is because puts random_guess is executed after the recursion. So when you see the output as, e.g: 3 0 guess is called as this: random_guess gets 0, so call guess. Inside the inner guess, random_guess gets 3, puts the current random_guess, which is 3. ...


5

Upon each return, the method adds at least one to the total size. For example, consider the following tree: (I'm bad at drawing, so I stole one online) Steps are as follow: Start from A, return size(B) + size(C) + 1. For B, return size(D) + 0 + 1. (0 because B has no right child, i.e. NULL) For D, return 0 + 0 + 1. size(D) = 1. Now going back, size(B) ...


0

Your function should return both the value of the best decision along with the set of values that lead to that best solution. Something like: struct solution { double min; int *decision; } This code: cost = getMinC(n+1, i+x-demand[n]) + storagecost * (i+x-demand[n]); if(x!=0) cost += fixc + varc * x; if(cost< min) { ...


3

bisect returns a double. When you call it within the method (recursively), you don't do anything with the return value: a = m; bisect(a,b,1.0e-10); You want to set the value of m to what you return: a = m; m = bisect(a,b,1.0e-10); You can simplify this a bit further: m = bisect(m, b, 1e-10); I ended up simplifying this a bit when I was figuring out ...



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