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39

The easiest way is to invert the value of the keys and use heapq. For example, turn 1000.0 into -1000.0 and 5.0 into -5.0.


22

It can also appear if you have a circular structure with a list pointing to itself. Like this: >>> a = [1,2] >>> a.append(a) >>> a [1, 2, [...]] >>> Since python can't print out the structure (it would be an infinite loop) it uses the ellipsis to show that there is recursion in the structure. I'm not quite sure if ...


21

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) { var paths = new List<string> { @"C:\WINDOWS\AppPatch\MUI\040C", @"C:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727", @"C:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\MUI", ...


17

You can use import heapq listForTree = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15] heapq.heapify(listForTree) # for a min heap heapq._heapify_max(listForTree) # for a maxheap!!


13

The data type you gave is special in that it is an embedding of the untyped lambda calculus. data Bad : Set where bad : (Bad → Bad) → Bad unbad : Bad → (Bad → Bad) unbad (bad f) = f Let's see how. Recall, the untyped lambda calculus has these terms: e := x | \x. e | e e' We can define a translation [[e]] from untyped lambda calculus terms to Agda ...


12

What's wrong with std::tuple here? #include <tuple> #include <set> template<class... Ts> using my_sets = std::tuple<std::set<Ts>...>; // ... auto x = my_sets<int, char, std::string>; std::get<0>(x).insert(5); std::get<1>(x).insert('z'); std::get<2>(x).insert("foo"); For looks, add a free insert ...


12

Firstly I would create a recursive function to iterate through your directory into an array function ReadFolderDirectory($dir,$listDir= array()) { $listDir = array(); if($handler = opendir($dir)) { while (($sub = readdir($handler)) !== FALSE) { if ($sub != "." && $sub != ".." && $sub != "Thumb.db") ...


11

An example how such a data type allows us to inhabit any type is given in Turner, D.A. (2004-07-28), Total Functional Programming, sect. 3.1, page 758 in Rule 2: Type recursion must be covariant." Let's make a more elaborate example using Haskell. We'll start with a "bad" recursive data type data Bad a = C (Bad a -> a) and construct the Y ...


10

The easiest is using a helper: @helper RecurseSomething(MyClass data) { <li> @data.Title @if (data.SubItems.Count() > 0) { <ul> @foreach(var subData in data.SubItems) { @RecurseSomething(subData); } </ul> } </li> }


10

We're going to follow Daniel Wagner's excellent suggestion and use the "naive representation (your first one), plus a function that picks one of the famous normal forms". We are going to use algebraic normal form for two reasons. The main reason is that algebraic normal form doesn't require enumerating all the possible values of the variable type held in a ...


9

Your μ type expressions are valid. I believe your types are regular as well since you only use recursion, sum, and products. The type T1 = μγ.1+(μβ.1+γβ)γ does not look equal to T2 = μβ.μγ.1+(1+γβ)γ since inr (inr (inl *, inr (inl *)), inl *) has the second type but not the first. The last type T3 = μβ.μγ.1+(μβ.1+γβ)γ is equal to (α-converting the ...


9

Yes, in a kind of round-about way, effectively unpacking and repacking the initializer list to a more suited format. However, there is a better (imho) way: Variadic templates. #include <stddef.h> #include <iostream> template <size_t N> struct Foo { template<class... Tail> constexpr Foo(int i, Tail... t) : x(i), xs(t...) {} ...


9

Tomas's answer suggests two possible ways to create recursive data structures in F#. A third possibility is to take advantage of the fact that record fields support direct recursion (when used in the same assembly that the record is defined in). For instance, the following code works without any problem: type 'a lst = Nil | NonEmpty of 'a nelst and 'a ...


9

Matching answers question "which selectors match given node", not "which nodes match a selector". This lets you simply evaluate each part of a selector against current node (compare node name/ID/class). Decendant combinator and inheritance are done through scanning of parent nodes. If you're interested what happens next, WebKit blog had nice series: WebCore ...


9

To build recursive structs you do not need typedef. You will have to convert the struct object into a struct pointer object. like this: struct teste{ int data; int data2; struct teste *to_teste; };


8

To iterate over a RecursiveIterator, you have to wrap it into a RecursiveIteratorIterator. See some examples at Introduction to Spl SplWiki The default iteration mode is only to list leaves. If you also want the containing nodes to appear in the iteration, pass RecursiveIteratorIterator::SELF_FIRST as the second argument to the constructor of the ...


8

Yes to all of the above. You have a couple of pointers that you're initializing with the same address, so they hold the same address, and that's the same as the address with which you initialized them. Perhaps more interestingly, x.a is also guaranteed to point to itself (i.e., the first element in a struct is guaranteed to be at the very beginning of the ...


8

This is standard C code. This paragraph of the mighty Standard permits it (emphasis mine): (C99, 6.2.1p7) "Structure, union, and enumeration tags have scope that begins just after the appearance of the tag in a type specifier that declares the tag. Each enumeration constant has scope that begins just after the appearance of its defining enumerator in an ...


7

You could add a term constructor to wrap a predicate. Here, I also factored all of the literals into their own data type: data Term = TLit Literal | TVar String | TPred Predicate data Literal = LitS String | LitI Int | LitF Double data Predicate = Predicate String [Term]


7

You cannot do this directly if the recursive reference is not delayed (e.g. wrapped in a function or lazy value). I think the motivation is that there is no way to create the value with immediate references "at once", so this would be awkward from the theoretical point of view. However, F# supports recursive values - you can use those if the recursive ...


7

As a high-level consideration, I'd say that your type represents a stateful stream transformer. What's a bit confusing here is that your type is defined as newtype R a = R (a , a -> R a) instead of newtype R a = R (a -> (R a, a)) which would be a bit more natural in the streaming context because you typically don't "produce" something if you ...


7

Scoping of μ works no different from other binders, so yes, all your examples are valid. They are also regular, because they do not even contain a λ. (*) As for equality, that depends on what sort of μ-types you have. There are basically two different notions: equi-recursive: in that case, the typing rules assume an equivalence μα.T = T[μα.T / α] i.e., ...


7

The cost of method size for main immutable collections (according to quick view on code): Seq: LinearSeq: List - O(N) Stream - O(N)* Queue - O(N) // Implemented using List Stack - O(N)* // Implemented using List, with additional complexity IndexedSeq: Vector - O(1) NumericRange - O(1) Array - O(1) // WrappedArray, ArrayOps ...


7

Even though following Rickard Nilsson's answer above got rid of the constant StackOverflowError on program startup, I'd still hit a StackOverflowError about one time out of three once I actually asked scalacheck to check the properties. (I changed Main above to run .check 40 times, and would see it succeed twice, then fail with a stack overflow, then succeed ...


6

Recursion is just a way of thinking, just as iterative is. When we were kids at school, we weren't taught to think recursively and there lies the real problem. You need to incorporate that way of thinking into your arsenal, once you do it, it'll stay there forever. Best way to master: I found useful to always figure out the base cases first, maybe at first ...


6

The problem is that when you tie the knot you don't "build" the structures of A and B but rather just declare how they are supposed to be built and then they get evaluated when needed. This naturally means that if the validation is done "in-line" with evaluation then the error checking must happen in IO because that's the only thing that can trigger ...


6

Haskell "creates" infinite lists because it doesn't create any elements until it needs to. For instance, let's walk through an expansion of head [1..] which results in 1 in Haskell and an infinite loop in strict languages. head [1..] === [expand `head`, literally just inline the ...


6

I believe, that your 'tree' contains itself, therefore it contains cycles. Try this code: a = [1,2,3,4] print a a.append(a) print a The first print outputs: [1,2,3,4] while the second: [1,2,3,4, [...]] The reason is using def Keys(x,y=[]): This is wrong and evil. List is a mutable object, and when used as a default ...


6

If your data has no cycles you'll be fine. But a cycle, like r = Ref "a" [("b", r)] is indeed going to generate an infinite result. The only way around this is for you to give unique labels to all nodes and use those to avoid cycles when converting to binary.


5

In Python I think you'd define the states and then set the map. Pseudo-code like: state0 = State("0") state1 = State("1") ... and so on ... state0.next_states = {message_a: state1, message_b: state2 } state1.next_states = {message_b: state3} ... and so on ...



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