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68

The answers to these questions vary depending on whether you are using a stream socket (SOCK_STREAM) or a datagram socket (SOCK_DGRAM) - within TCP/IP, the former corresponds to TCP and the latter to UDP. How do you know how big to make the buffer passed to recv()? SOCK_STREAM: It doesn't really matter - just pick a size (3000 is fine). Larger buffers ...


45

The answer by Larry Hastings has some great general advice about sockets, but there are a couple of mistakes as it pertains to how the recv(bufsize) method works in the Python socket module. So, to clarify, since this may be confusing to others looking to this for help: The bufsize param for the recv(bufsize) method is not optional. You'll get an error ...


32

This is a very bad idea. Binary data should always be sent in a way that: Handles different endianness Handles different padding Handles differences in the byte-sizes of intrinsic types Don't ever write a whole struct in a binary way, not to a file, not to a socket. Always write each field separately, and read them the same way. You need to have ...


20

The network is always unpredictable. TCP makes a lot of this random behavior go away for you. One wonderful thing TCP does: it guarantees that the bytes will arrive in the same order. But! It does not guarantee that they will arrive chopped up in the same way. You simply cannot assume that every send() from one end of the connection will result in ...


15

In the case of a non blocking socket that has no data available, recv will throw the socket.error exception and the value of the exception will have the errno of either EAGAIN or EWOULDBLOCK. Example: import sys import socket import fcntl, os import errno from time import sleep s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM) ...


10

You are making the usual mistakes. You can't assume that recv() fills the buffer. You have to loop until you have all the data you need, and you have to make use of the count value returned by recv().


9

TCP segments with a payload size of 0 are ubiquitous - they occur in pretty much every real-world TCP stream. They're sent whenever one side wishes to acknowledge reciept of data from the other, but has no data to send of its own. (These are commonly known as "ACK packets", but an "ACK packet" is just a regular segment that happens to contain no data). ...


8

One thread will get it, and there's no way to tell which. This doesn't seem like a reasonable design. Is there a reason why you need two threads calling recv() on the same socket?


8

In the server code, the problem is on this line: msg_len = read(sockfd, msg, MAX_DATA_SIZE); You are calling read on sockfd, but you need to call read or recv on new_sockfd (the socket returned by accept()). new_sockfd is the one that's connected to the client (sockfd is used to accept further connections - eg if another client connects).


8

If you have a SOCK_STREAM socket, recv just gets "up to the first 3000 bytes" from the stream. There is no clear guidance on how big to make the buffer: the only time you know how big a stream is, is when it's all done;-). If you have a SOCK_DGRAM socket, and the datagram is larger than the buffer, recv fills the buffer with the first part of the datagram, ...


8

If you want to grab files using HTTP, then libcURL is probably your best bet in C. However, if you are using this as a way to learn network programming, then you are going to have to learn a bit more about HTTP before you can retrieve a file. What you are seeing in your current program is that you need to send an explicit request for the file before you ...


7

If this is a TCP socket, you shouldn't care. The socket delivers a stream, it's doesn't correspond in any way or fashion to the size of the original write()s to the other end. It could deliver a megabyte as one million 1-byte read()s, or as a single 1MB one, or any combination in between. If you depend on the size of the delivered data "chunks" for a TCP ...


7

The problem is, you have to implement the HTTP protocol. Downloading a file is not just a matter of connecting to the server, you have to send HTTP requests (along with proper HTTP header) before you get a response. After this, you would still need to parse the returned data to strip out more HTTP headers. If you're just trying to download files using C, I ...


7

I know this is an old thread and that Samuel probably fixed his issue a long time ago. However, I had the same problem and came across this post while google'ing. Found a solution and think it is worthwhile to add. You can use the shutdown method on the socket class. It can prevent further sends, receives or both. socket.shutdown(socket.SHUT_WR) The ...


7

You're looking for is ioctl(fd,FIONREAD,&bytes_available) , and under windows ioctlsocket(socket,FIONREAD,&bytes_available). Be warned though, the OS doesn't necessarily guarantee how much data it will buffer for you, so if you are waiting for very much data you are going to be better off reading in data as it comes in and storing it in your own ...


7

For instance if I changed the 3rd argument to recv() to something higher than the buffer pointed to by recv_data (e.g. 4000) - would this cause a buffer overflow? Ofcourse yes. If the network buffer has data of 4000 bytes, it will put it in the buffer. The key point is that, recv like any other C API which takes a buffer and it's length believes that ...


7

You are passing into recv a pointer to TStringStream object itself, not to its data buffer. That's why the object gets corrupted. Use Memory property: recv(connfd, inBuf.Memory^, inLen, 0). The same goes for sending: send data from stream, not the stream object (sizeof(msg) in your SSend returns just size of a pointer).


6

The other side is closing the connection. That's how HTTP/1.0 works. You can: Make a different connection for each HTTP GET Use HTTP/1.0 with the unofficial Connection: Keep-Alive Use HTTP/1.1. In HTTP 1.1 all connections are considered persistent unless declared otherwise. Obligatory xkcd link Server Attention Span Wiki HTTP The original version ...


6

HTTP protocol requires that 2 carriage returns/newlines are sent to end the HTTP request I dont see them in your question


6

Correct. There are two different specifications (unfortunately I cannot test currently) 2.1 ETIMEOUT would be returned. (EAGAIN or EWOULDBLOCK are returned on non-blocking sockets if no data is immediately available.) http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/recv.html 2.2 EAGAIN or EWOULDBLOCK would be returned for both possibilities ...


5

You can alternatively use recv(x_bytes, socket.MSG_WAITALL), which seems to work only on Unix, and will return exactly x_bytes.


5

Using the 'pragma' pack option did solved my problem but I am not sure if it has any dependencies ?? #pragma pack(1) // this helps to pack the struct to 5-bytes struct packet { int i; char j; }; #pragma pack(0) // turn packing off Then the following lines of code worked out fine without any problem n = sendto(sock,&pkt,sizeof(struct ...


5

The POSIX standard specifies that with MSG_PEEK, "the data is treated as unread and the next recv() or similar function will still return this data." That seems to mean that unless ret2 is -1, it will be the same as ret1.


5

If no messages are available at the socket and O_NONBLOCK is not set on the socket's file descriptor, recv() shall block until a message arrives. If no messages are available at the socket and O_NONBLOCK is set on the socket's file descriptor, recv() shall fail and set errno to [EAGAIN] or [EWOULDBLOCK]. Source: ...


5

Set your line ending to \x{00} (\0), be sure to localise it, and getline on the handle, like so: { local $/ = "\x{00}"; while (my $line = $sock->getline) { print "$line\n"; # do whatever with your data here } }


5

Nice question. How perfect do you want to go? For an all singing all dancing solution, use asynchronous sockets, read all the data you can whenever you can, and whenever you get new data call some data processing function on the buffer. This allows you to do big reads. If you get a lot of commands pipelined you could potentially process them without having ...


5

The TCP standard allows for fragmentation of data packets. In practice this doesn't happen with small data packets of a few hundred bytes or so, but a megabyte of data is almost certain to get fragmented. Secondly, when you say the sniffer says all the data gets sent, in one packet or in many? Good network programming practice requires you to not assume ...


5

A much better way is to use following: void get_all_buf(int sock, std::string & output) { char buffer[1024]; int n; while((errno = 0, (n = recv(sock, buffer, sizeof(buffer), 0))>0) || errno == EINTR) { if(n>0) output.append(buffer, n); } if(n < 0){ /* handle error - for example ...


5

The usual way to deal with this is to recv into a persistent buffer in your application, then pull a single line out and process it. Later you can process the remaining lines in the buffer before calling recv again. Keep in mind that the last line in the buffer may only be partially received; you have to deal with this case by re-entering recv to finish the ...


5

Sockets in Python are blocking by the default. This behavior can be changed with setblocking or settimeout. Another good place to find information on this is the socket how-to, especially the section on non-blocking sockets.



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