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34

Change setup do @response = responses(:one) end to setup do @myresponse = responses(:one) end and off you go! The problem lies in "actionpack-3.0.1/lib/action_controller/test_case.rb" around line 386. The testcase assumes that @response holds a "ActionDispatch::Response". You overwrite it, it's no "ActionDispatch::Response" anymore and the ...


20

Straight from the Android documentation: Returns an immutable bitmap from the specified subset of the source bitmap. The new bitmap may be the same object as source, or a copy may have been made. It seems that the createBitmap functions have the potential to re-use the bitmap that you provided. If that is the case, then you shouldn't recycle the ...


15

a) Because of Overlapped Recycling. There is a time period that the "old" process waits for the new one to start. b) No. As far as I know.


12

By default - if you change 15 files in an ASP.NET application at once (even via FTP) then the app pool is automatically recycled. You can change the number of files but as soon as web.config and bin files are changed then it needs to recycle. So in my opinion the ideal solution for an environment like yours would be as follows: 4 web servers (this is an ...


12

You could easily find the latest recycle time by using this powershell snippet: (Get-Process -Id <ProcessId>).StartTime Therefore find the process id of your web application in task manager. First add the following columns via Tools > Select columns... : select PID and Command Line. Look for any w3wp.exe process and find your application by ...


9

A recycle if I recall correctly allows all existing requests to finish then it will recycle the application pool. A stop simply ends it at the exact instant that you stop it.


9

It's easy. The first time no row is created, so you have to inflate them. Afterwards, the Android os may decide to recycle the views that you already inflated and that are not visible anymore. Those are already inflated and passed into the convertView parameter, so all you have to do is to arrange it to show the new current item, for example placing the ...


8

If logging on recycles is turned on you can see this in the Event Viewer. If it's not you can use PerfMon counters to see Process-Elapsed Time on the W3WP.exe representing your application pool (which will be the number of seconds since the last recycle)


8

It depends. If you run your app on Android 3.0 and above, it's not needed as the GC will take care of it perfectly. However, if you run your app on older versions, since bitmaps don't get monitored well by the GC (it thinks they are the size of a reference), you could get OOM, as shown on Google IO lecture here. In any case, it's still recommended to call ...


8

Try to add this before calling recycle() methods to make sure bitmap isn't already recycled: if (mBitmap != null && !mBitmap.isRecycled()) { mBitmap.recycle(); mBitmap = null; }


6

I found this article on Scott Guthries's blog: Logging ASP.NET Application Shutdown Events Someone on a listserv recently asked whether there was a way to figure out why and when ASP.NET restarts application domains. Specifically, he was looking for the exact cause of what was triggering them on his application in a production shared ...


6

As Justin says, Bitmap data is not allocated in the VM heap. There is a reference to it in the VM heap (which is small), but the actual data is allocated in the Native heap by the underlying Skia graphics library. [Note that this may have changed in later Android levels, but is true for 2.1 and 2.2] When you do a recycle() that marks both the small portion ...


6

I back Romain's proposal, but I'm not sure your question is addressing your actual problem. I don't know how you handle the references to your Views. Maybe you simply have memory leaks in your application? A lot of memory leaks in Android are related to Context. When a Drawable is attached to a View, the View is set as a callback on the Drawable. TextView ...


5

I have discovered that, in Honeycomb onwards, if an ImageView contains a Bitmap that has been recycled, the Bitmap data is still retained in memory until setImageBitmap(null) is called on the ImageView. This may even be the case if setImageResource(...) or setImageDrawable(...) are called (in this case, a very large bitmap was replaced with a fairly small ...


5

At the very base you could run a tinyget script against the application after completion of deployment which will "warm up" the application however if a customer hits your site before the script can run, they will still face a delay. What do you currently have in place, what post deployment steps do you have in place? In a farm environment you could stage ...


5

Bitmaps do not need to be manually recycled. They are garbage collected just like Drawables and other objects. Similarly you don't need to unbind drawables, except in very specific situations. It seems that you read a lot of misleading information. Recycling bitmaps and unbinding drawable can be useful in some situations (for instance if your app manipulate ...


5

you said that you have use Viewpager in application then make sure in it's PagerAdapter adapter you have use below method. @Override public void destroyItem(ViewGroup container, int position, Object object) { // TODO Auto-generated method stub ((ViewPager)container).removeView((View)object); } this method remove ...


5

I understand that elements are reused, but how do I know exact what to implement in the first part of the if statement, and what in the second? The organization is quite simple once you get the hang of it: public View getView(int position, View convertView, ViewGroup parent) { if (convertView == null) { /* This is where you initialize new ...


5

You should hold onto the TypedArray you get back from obtainTypedArray() and call recycle() on it after using it. Also, hard-coding a hex value like 0x7f050000 is unlikely to be the right answer.


4

Your app domain will be unloaded, all threads will stop. You will have to handle this case with appropriate Application_Start and Application_End handlers. Also see: "ASP.NET Application Life Cycle Overview"


4

copy and paste from my post here We operate a Blue/Green deployment strategy on a 4 tier architecture which has a web site over 4 servers at the top tier. Due to the complexity the architecture introduced for deployments, we needed a way to deploy without disturbing any traffic to the "live" site. Following Fowler's advice, but not quite in the same way, we ...


4

Looking in Reflector at the method (Sitecore.Tasks.ItemEventHandler.OnItemDeleted) which is throwing the exception, it would appear that your null reference is likely the TaskDatabase. protected void OnItemDeleted(object sender, EventArgs args) { Item item = Event.ExtractParameter(args, 0) as Item; Error.AssertNotNull(item, "No item in parameters"); ...


4

I would recommend that you use the View holder and convertview pattern to create your listView as it will be more efficient.Here is a good explanation of how it works with a re-use strategy. This will answer your question on how re-cycling works. If you want to refer to a code sample, I have it on GitHub. Hope this helps.


4

Use the DialogFragment.show(FragmentManager manager, String tag) version instead. So in your case: protected void showNewsItem(News news) { DialogFragment newFragment = MyNewsFragment.newInstance(); newFragment.show(getFragmentManager(), "dialog"); } Usually, the above idiom is sufficient for showing a DialogFragment. The ...


4

use a recycle(); at the end of your obtainTypedArray() statement. do not use hex values, may lead to complications in your code in future.


4

Simply: the code that calls your method is responsible to recycle the database object. This rule applies to SSJS code too! You must not recycle the session either, because it recycles all object derived from it.


3

Pooling is a very common technique to avoid frequent allocations and deallocations. Some treat it as a design pattern. There are typically existing implementations, so there is no benefit to reinventing the wheel. You may want to take a look at the question http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1250983/object-pool-vs-dynamic-allocation


3

Recycle frees the native memory that is allocated to the bitmap. The actual Bitmap object will remain in the Dalvik Heap until the next garbage collection (but the memory taken up by this object is insignificant). As far as I am aware, there really is no way to dump the native heap. So you won't be able to see if the bitmap's native data is gone via a heap ...


3

I solved this problem. Solution Steps: First I open ControlPanel> ActionCenter> Problem Reports I saw list of problems. and my IIS Crash problem. I entered item detail and save it is dumps. I downloaded Windbg then open this dump with it. and enter command !analyze -v Windbg analized and show a text like this: GetPageUrlData failed, server returned HTTP ...


3

Since with 1 thread you got about 5 fps, presumably with 4 threads, you got to somewhere around 20 fps? So, you would be creating and destroying 80+ threads per second if you don't keep them around? Threads are fairly lightweight, but I think you'd begin to notice that much overhead.



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