Hot answers tagged

9

Restart server does exactly what it says, and restarts the tomcat server. Your war will be rebuilt and deployed at server startup. This is useful if you are having trouble hot-swapping your classes. Redeploy will redeploy the entire .war (without restarting the the server), as opposed to trying to hot-swap out changed classes and other resources. See also: ...


8

As far as I know there is no direct alternative to JRebel, both open-source and commercial. DCEVM is only capable of improved code-reloading (compared to HotSwap) and has no any framework or application server awareness. Also as you already found out it only works with SUN JVM. BTW, you should be able to use Websphere with SUN JVM too if what DCEVM provides ...


7

The Memory MX Bean will give you all non-heap usage, of which the perm gen is a part. The size of the perm gen pool itself should be available using the Memory Pool MX Bean, but be aware that the names of the pools are implementation and GC-dependent. Both of these JMX beans are available from the platform server, as usual, so they should be obtainable ...


4

When you deploy a war on your tomcat server it will delete all the files and then add it.


4

I gave up on using the tomcat manager and now always shutdown tomcat to redeploy. We run two tomcats on the same server and use apache webserver with mod_proxy_ajp so users can access both apps via the same port 80. This is nice also because the users see the apache Service Unavailable page when the tomcat is down.


4

I manage to reload it by doing this : LoggerContext loggerContext = (LoggerContext) LoggerFactory.getILoggerFactory(); loggerContext.reset(); ContextInitializer ci = new ContextInitializer(loggerContext); ci.autoConfig(); In my use case, I do that to add some properties to the context by doing : loggerContext.putProperty("logDirectory", ...


3

For anyone who stumbles upon this question, I had the same problem and managed to fix it by deleting everything under the /mods folder in the /target directory. This is in fact mentioned in the vertx documentation - though maybe could be a little more emphatic. Once everything under /mods is removed, start up the application and it redeploys whenever ...


3

Perhaps command "touch" will be useful for a fictitious file modification, after properties set.


3

You can try adding these Java options: -XX:+CMSClassUnloadingEnabled -XX:+CMSPermGenSweepingEnabled This enables garbage collection in PermGen space (off by default) and allows the GC to unload classes. In addition you should use the -XX:PermSize=64m -XX:MaxPermSize=128m mentioned elsewhere to increase the amount of PermGen available.


2

Yes indeed, this is a problem. We're running three web apps on a Tomcat server: No. 1 uses a web application framework, Hibernate and many other JARs, no. 2 uses Hibernate and a few JARs and no. 3 is basically a very simple JSP application. When we deploy no. 1, we always restart Tomcat. Otherwise a PermGen space error will soon bite us. No. 2 can sometimes ...


2

PermGen switches in HotSpot only delay the problem, and eventually you will get the OutOfMemoryError anyway. We have had this problem a long time, and the only solution I've found so far is to use JRockit instead. It doesn't have a PermGen, so the problem just disappears. We are evaluating it on our test servers now, and we haven't had one PermGen issue ...


2

Update resources. All changed resources (that is, all application components other than the classes) will be updated. Update classes and resources. All changed resources will be updated; changed classes will be recompiled. In the debug mode, the updated classes will be hot-swapped. In the run mode, IntelliJ IDEA will just update the changed classes in the ...


2

I am not closely familiar with JBoss, but in Tomcat with certain settings you can edit JSP directly in Tomcat and see the change after page reload. There is also a commercial tool called JRebel that allows you to make changes without redeploying. This works for JSPs, Java files and supported frameworks (e.g. for Spring it allows reload of configuration ...


2

Load balancing is a natural choice with play because of it's stateless nature. You can deploy on one instance at a time, and your application will remain available all the time as long as the other instances are UP. Once the application deployed put it back to the load balancer and end users will not notice any outage


1

Well a .war is nothing else then a zipped version of your webapp. So if you know which files have changed you can simply only replace those. If your changes only affect .html or .swf files or only images then you will not even need to restart. However any jar file, change to web.xml or other servlet container specific files will need a restart of the ...


1

Is that right that in container environment daemon threads are danger and lead to memory leaks? The statement about daemon threads refer to the case of a stand alone application (as in the bug report), where the JVM is supposed to shut down when the application is finished. The non-daemon thread prevents the JVM from shutting down. In a JavaEE context, ...


1

Unfortunately there's not a way to reduce the time taken to deploy a package to ShinyApps currently. But we do recommend that you develop and test the package locally before deploying it to ShinyApps. That way you can iterate on your application very quickly by testing locally using the shiny::runApp() command then when you're happy with your application, ...


1

You can edit the xhtml file in place (as in, in the place from which it is running - often your build area for development environments) and it will update on the next refresh. We have a maven build that only moves xhtml files from our development project to our development (local to each developer's workstation) deployment area.


1

Regarding your first question, it depends on the type of the resource. For a classpath resource, you can override the file in any directory that has a higher priority in the class loading mechanism of your application server ($CATALINA_HOME/lib for instance if you're using Tomcat). For an xml file, like web.xml, you can declare an external entity in the ...


1

What is your version of Liferay? If it is 6.1.1 then this is a known issue http://issues.liferay.com/browse/LPS-29103 If you just need to deploy the portlets once - change order of listeners in web.xml manually as suggested in the ticket. If you need to redeploy the portlets alot (for development) then the previous solution is very time consuming and the ...


1

Just of reference, there is a new version of Plumbr tool, that can monitor and detect Permanent Generation leaks as well.


1

Which version of Tomcat are you using? Tomcat 7 and 6.0.30 have many features to avoid these leaks, or at least warn you about their cause. This presentation by Mark Thomas of SpringSource (and longtime Tomcat committer) on this subject is very interesting.


1

You should enable PermGen garbage collection. By default Hotspot VM does NOT collect PermGen garbage, which means all loaded class files remain in memory forever. Every new deployment loads a new set of class files which means you eventually run out of PermGen space.



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