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9

Simple example: if cond if cond2 cmd else cmd2 Question: Where does the else belong to? For the human eye, the indentation says "to the second if" but that means nothing to a computer (except when using Python ;)). This is a shift/reduce conflict. A elegant solution is to treat the else as a left-binding operator of the highest ...


8

The difference is because, in the first case, the parser has to make a choice about the reduction before it gets to see whether one 'X' or two will follow. In the second, the parser can use the same state, let's call it BX, when it's seen a B and an X—both shifted—and then depending on the next token, can shift (if an X), and then reduce the 'B' 'X' 'X' ...


4

The basic problem with your grammar is that when you seen ( VARIABLE and the next token is ), the parser can't tell whether this should be a parenthesized expr or logical_expr -- it depends on the next token AFTER the ). If that next token is +. -, < or > then its an expr, while if it's AND or OR (or EOF), then its a logical_expr. The usual solution ...


3

The usual way this problem is dealt with in C parsers is something generally called "the lexer feedback hack". Its a 'hack' in the sense that it doesn't deal with it in the grammar at all; instead, when the lexer recognizes an identifier, it classifies that identifier as either a typename or a non-typename, and returns a different token for each case ...


3

The basic problem is that you have an ambiguous grammar, and you're (attempting to) use precedence rules to resolve the ambiguity, but it fails because the ambiguity manifests as a reduce/reduce conflict, and precedence rules are useless in that case. You can get a better idea what is going on by using bison's -v option to get a listing of the state machine ...


2

The problem is that your grammar is specified so that eg the semicolon can be interpreted either as the semicolon of while_stmt or that of block_stmt... no sorry not that but somehow the grammar is redundant because { stmt } appears twice on RHS. Normally you would do stmts ::= stmt | stmts stmt block_stmt ::= { stmts } stmt ::= ... | block_stmt | ; ...


2

You want YYERROR not yyerror -- putting YYERROR in an action causes the parser to make the action a syntax error, and go into error recovery mode (if you have any error recovery actions in your parser -- otherwise this is more or less equivalent to YYABORT). yyerror is a routine that bison calls with error messages -- the default implementation is to print ...


2

It might be possible to solve a reduce/reduce conflict with more lookahead. It might also be possible to solve it by refactoring. It really depends on the nature of the conflict. There is no general procedure. An example of a reduce/reduce conflict which can be solved by extra lookahead: A → something B → A C → A D → B u v D → C u w Here, the last two ...


2

Yes, the C cast syntax was very badly chosen. It is impossible to resolve correctly without knowing whether what is inside the cast is a type or a value. Here are some cases in C: (f)*a // cast the value pointed to by a to type f, or multiply f by a? (f)(a+b) // cast a+b to type f or call the function f with argument a+b? The easiest way I've found to ...


1

The easy solution is to check the validity of the parenthesized list in a semantic action attached to production 1. Then you just get rid of PARAM, and use ARG instead. The other easy solution is to ask bison to generate a GLR parser instead of an LALR parser. Since the grammar is unambiguous, this will work fine. It will be slightly slower, but in most ...


1

The problem you're running into is that yacc precedence levels are only taken into account to resolve shift/reduce conflicts, not reduce/reduce. In this case, the opt_at_type rule can match an empty string (it's optional), leading to a reduce/reduce conflict. To fix it, you need to unfactor the rule to get rid of the epsilon production: expr: expr '.' ...


1

As you say, the problem is the epsilon reduction of n, which needs to be associated with the shift of the ELSE. The problem will occur in exactly the same circumstance as the "ambiguous" else, since it will not be clear to which if statement the n belongs. The obvious and easy solution is to move the n after the ELSE since it does not make any difference ...


1

The problem is that with the new rules, the grammar requires arbitrary lookahead to tell the difference between a varDecl and an expStmt. This comes from LT being both a binary operator for expressions, and indicating the start of a tyargs list for a parameterized type. One possible fix would be to introduce a new keyword to denote a parameterized type or ...


1

You're using the wrong method calls to populate the Text objects. You should be using the readFields method of the Text object. Currently you are trying to populate the Text object via the constructor, which accepts a String as its argument. You can't just read a String back from the DataInput object using in.readLine as a Text object is serialized to the ...


1

I do not understand very well why this is happening but I solved the problem changing these code lines in the class "ValorFechaHora" public void readFields(DataInput in) throws IOException { Medicion = new IntWritable(in.readInt()); //Fecha = new Text(in.readLine()); //Hora = new Text(in.readLine()); //Those two lines for these ...


1

Well, no one has answered, but you have made the grammar gloriously ambiguous. There are two possible productions for: LT ID GT ID LT ID GT take some examples: <a> b<a> are these to be tyargs or tyvars or the beginning of a callExp? Your grammar says they can be both. It is therefore quite difficult to parse with tools like ml-yacc without ...


1

The best way to type check during compilation is to do an analysis pass over the AST. In order to provide accurate error messages, you'll need to keep location information for every token in the AST, but that's generally useful anyway. The advantage of doing the semantic analysis after building the AST is that the code is much cleaner, because it doesn't ...


1

context.write(null, insHBase); The problem is that you are writing the Put out to the context and hbase is expecting an IntWritable. You should write the outputs out to the context and let Hbase take charge of storing them. Hase is expecting to store an IntWritable but you are handing it a Put operation which extends Mutation. The workflow for Hbase is ...


1

Methinks you want %left '-' '+' expression : operand | expression '-' expression | expression '+' expression | '(' expression ')'


1

This looks a bit strange for an XML grammar. Are you sure you don't want empty node_lists or attribute_lists? Anyway, try this: node_list : node | node_list node /* list first, element second, this is the LALR way */ ; node : terminal_node | nonterminal_node /* note a typo in your code here */ ;


1

According to 'Lex & Yacc' the default resolution of the reduce/reduce is the first defined rule, so as you say the exprLoop wins, so I'll assume it is defined first. But switching the order may not solve the problem how you expect. Further reading (page 237) it appears that you need more look ahead, which is not an option for standard yacc/bison. But ...



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