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10

there are two mistakes here in your code: 1) you don't add your current sum to the recursive call result 2) you should return zero when the list is empty corrected variant: (defn newRd [list] (let [sum 0] (if (not= 0 (count list)) (+ sum (first list) (newRd (rest list))) sum))) in repl: user> (newRd [1 2 3 4]) 10 next, ...


5

With itertools.chain() on the values This could be faster: from itertools import chain categories = list(chain.from_iterable(categories.values)) Performance from functools import reduce from itertools import chain categories = pd.Series([['a', 'b'], ['c', 'd', 'e']] * 1000) %timeit list(chain.from_iterable(categories.values)) 1000 loops, best of 3: ...


4

Version 1 From MDN Docs for Array#reduce The first time the callback is called, previousValue and currentValue can be one of two values. If initialValue is provided in the call to reduce, then previousValue will be equal to initialValue and currentValue will be equal to the first value in the array. In version #1, the initialValue is provided. So, ...


4

If you know for a fact that you want to skip the first n elements, you can use Array#slice Using ES2015 Arrow Function var sum = array.slice(n).reduce((a, b) => a + b); var studentGrades = ["John Doe", "Some School", 6, 7, 8, 7, 9, 9]; var sum = studentGrades.slice(2).reduce((a, b) => a + b); document.body.innerHTML = 'SUM is = ' + sum; ...


3

First of all, I would break the problem down a little differently. I would use Ramda's R.__ placeholder to fill in the first argument to R.lte and R.gte, so that they read better. I like to alias this with a plain underscore, so this will read R.both(R.gte(_, 13), R.lte(_, 19)), which I find more readable. Then I would separate out the function which ...


2

Read the documentation for Enumerable#reduce, specifically: If you specify a block, then for each element in enum the block is passed an accumulator value (memo) and the element...the result becomes the new value for memo. At the end of the iteration, the final value of memo is the return value for the method. For a little added clarity, your ...


2

Further to leetwinksi's answer ... You might as well implement new-reduce (camel case is not idiomatic) in general: (defn new-reduce ([f init coll] (if (seq coll) (recur f (f init (f init (first coll))) (rest coll)) init)) ([f coll] (if (seq coll) (reduce f (first coll) (rest coll)) (f)))) Then (new-reduce + [1 2 3]) ;; ...


2

To be clear, you are asking to do this: apply the func to the first two elements in coll, then apply the func to the result of the first two elements and the third element, That is exactly what reduce does: user> (reduce list [1 2 3 4]) (((1 2) 3) 4) The list of the first two is (1 2). Then, apply the list function to this result and the next ...


1

Might be good to contrast reduce with apply. Here's the best definition I could find for apply: apply explodes a seqable data structure so it can be passed to a function that expects a rest parameter. For example, max takes any number of arguments and returns the greatest of all the arguments. This definition comes from the 'Brave and True' book ...


1

You can reduce (arr, cha, ind) => upcaseOddIndexes (arr, cha, ind) to upcaseOddIndexes: string = "stringthing" upcasedString = string .split "" .reduce upcaseOddIndexes, [] .join "" That is converted to var string, upcasedString; string = "stringthing"; upcasedString = string.split("").reduce(upcaseOddIndexes, []).join(""); or without reduction: ...


1

There is a lot broken in both your host and device code here, and I am not going to attempt to go through all of the problems. but I can at least see: extern __shared__ float sdata[]; // must be declared volatile for the warp reduct to work reliably This accumulate code is broken in a lot of ways, but at least: if (tid>=n) return; // undefined ...


1

Rather than explain it, I want to show you the iteration process.. words = %w{cat sheep bear} words.reduce do |memo, word| memo.length > word.length ? memo : word end The variable words == ['cat', 'sheep', 'bear'] # First iteration uses 'cat' and 'sheep' 'cat'.length > 'sheep'.length ? 'cat' : 'sheep' # This ternary returns 'sheep' because ...


1

It has turned out that the generalization of reduce can be quite easily achieved once you have become accustomed to CPS: const foldL = f => acc => xs => xs.length ? f(acc)(xs[0])(xss => foldL(f)(xss)(xs.slice(1))) : acc; const map = f => foldL(acc => x => cont => cont(acc.concat([f(x)])))([]); const filter = pred => foldL(acc ...


1

Vectorized but slow You can use NumPy's concatenate: import numpy as np list(np.concatenate(categories.values)) Performance But we have lists, i.e. Python objects already. So the vectorization has to switch back and forth between Python objects and NumPy data types. This make things slow: categories = pd.Series([['a', 'b'], ['c', 'd', 'e']] * 1000) ...


1

reduce's 3rd argument is an index, here is the fiddle var averageGrade = onlyIntegersArr.reduce(function (a, b, c) { if (c >= 2) { return a + b; } else { return 0; } }); if array has more non-numeric items after second index then check this fiddle var studentGrades = ["John Doe", "Some School", 6, 7, 8, 7, 9, 9, "Some ...


1

I'm sorry that this probably isn't going to be what you want to hear, but in java, arrays are technically fixed and size cannot be directly changed. There are ways around it, and the method (not a java method!) that I suggest would be to use a linked list data structure. It sounds intimidating, but there's tons of help on YouTube when it comes to java. In ...


1

A solution with a temporary object and a hash function. var array = [ { ID: 1, person: 'John' }, { ID: 2, person: 'Malcolm' }, { ID: 3, person: 'Vera' }, { ID: 1, person: 'John' }, { ID: 2, person: 'Malcolm' } ], unique = array.reduce(function (r, a) { if (!(a.ID in r.hash)) { ...


1

The expression p[1] isn't an array of all the id:s in the array p, it's the second item in the array p. You would use the findIndex method so that you can provide a function that compares the id:s in the items: function arrayUnique(a) { return a.reduce(function(p, c) { if (p.findIndex(function(e){ return e[1] == c.ID; }) == -1) ...


1

You're messing up with data structures here. If you're pushing an array into an array, indexOf won't work as you expect. Instead, push objects. var arrayUnique = function(a) { return a.reduce(function(p, c) { if (!p['i' + c.ID]) p['i' + c.ID] = {name: c.person, id: c.ID}; return p; }, {}); }; What if(!p['i' + c.ID]) does is, it ...



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