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108

1. How is safely defined? Semantically. In this case, this is not a hard-defined term. It just mean "You can do that, without risk". 2. If a program can be safely executed concurrently, does it always mean that it is reentrant? No. For example, let's have a C++ function that takes both a lock, and a callback as a parameter: typedef void (*MyCallback)() ...


46

It depends on the definition. For example Qt uses the following: A thread-safe* function can be called simultaneously from multiple threads, even when the invocations use shared data, because all references to the shared data are serialized. A reentrant function can also be called simultaneously from multiple threads, but only if each invocation ...


40

You could let the timer continue firing the callback method but wrap your non-reentrant code in a Monitor.TryEnter/Exit. No need to stop/restart the timer in that case; overlapping calls will not acquire the lock and return immediately. private void CreatorLoop(object state) { if (Monitor.TryEnter(lockObject)) { try { // Work here ...


38

malloc and printf usually use global structures, and employ lock-based synchronization internally. That's why they're not reentrant. The malloc function could either be thread-safe or thread-unsafe. Both are not reentrant: Malloc operates on a global heap, and it's possible that two different invocations of malloc that happen at the same time, return ...


31

Reentrancy means that locks are acquired on a per-thread rather than per-invocation basis. That is a misleading definition. It is true (sort of), but it misses the real point. Reentrancy means (in general CS / IT terminology) that you do something, and while you are still doing it, you do it again. In the case of locks it means you do something like ...


30

Re-entrant functions do not rely on global variables that are exposed in the C library headers .. take strtok() vs strtok_r() for example in C. Some functions need a place to store a 'work in progress' , re-entrant functions allow you to specify this pointer within the thread's own storage, not in a global. errno, however, is a slightly different case on ...


24

The main difference is that a Lock can only be acquired once. It cannot be acquired again, until it is released. (After it's been released, it can be re-acaquired by any thread). An RLock on the other hand, can be acquired multiple times, by the same thread. It needs to be released the same number of times in order to be "unlocked". Another difference is ...


21

Re-entrant code has no state in a single point. You can call the code while something is executing in the code. If the code uses global state, one call can conceivably overwrite the global state, breaking the computation in the other call. Thread safe code is code with no race conditions or other concurrency issues. A race condition is where the order in ...


19

"Safely" is defined exactly as the common sense dictates - it means "doing its thing correctly without interfering with other things". The six points you cite quite clearly express the requirements to achieve that. The answers to your 3 questions is 3× "no". Are all recursive functions reentrant? NO! Two simultaneous invocations of a recursive function ...


18

if we say that reentrant means that it can be invoked by more than one caller at the same time Wrong. Reentrant means you can interrupt it and call it again before the previous incarnation ended. Imagine malloc looks like this: lock(mutex); /* Stuff. */ unlock(mutex): What happens if it is interrupted in the middle, before unlocking and someone ...


17

It's easier to remember when you understand what the term means. The term "re-entrant" means that it is safe to "re-enter" the function while it is already executed, typically in a concurrent environment. In other words, when two tasks can execute the function at the same time without interfering with each other, then the function is re-entrant. A function ...


16

A function is re-entrant if it supports having multiple threads of execution "going through" it at the same time. This might be due to actual multi-threading, and I use this case below, or due to other things as pointed out by other posters. Multi-threading was the first that came to mind, and is perhaps also the easiest to understand, so I focused on that ...


16

Early C++ implementations, which were based on translation to C, implemented global constructors via adding a function call to the beginning of main. Under such an implementation, calling main again would re-run the global ctors, resulting in havoc, so it was simply forbidden to do so. C on the other hand had no reason to forbid calling main, and it was ...


14

Yes, each thread gets its own separate local variable. This function will always return 2 even if called by multiple threads simultaneously.


13

Instead of using a bool and setting it directly, try using a long and the Interlocked class: long m_InFunction=0; if(Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref m_InFunction,1,0)==0) { // We're not in the function try { } finally { m_InFunction=0; } } else { // We're already in the function } This will make the check thread safe.


12

At its simplest a re-entrant parser doesn't use global variables and thus can have multiple instances active at the same time (not necessarily related to threading, but this is the main use case I suspect). In more complex use cases, however, you can have a parser that parses, in effect, multiple languages in the same source document. Consider a JSP ...


11

In all but the most highly embedded platforms, it'll be reentrant. You mention SIGSEGV so I assume it's not one of those. In this case it's most likely memcpy() isn't the culprit: it's the caller's fault. If you ask memcpy() to copy bad pointers (or bad length) then it'll be the one which faults. You could easily do this: memcpy(NULL, NULL, 123456789); ...


10

Imagine something like this: function A(): lock (X) B() unlock (X) function B(): A() Now we call A. The following happens: We enter A, locking X We enter B We enter A again, locking X again Since we never exited the first invocation of A, X is still locked. This is called re-entrance - while function A has not yet returned, function ...


9

The two are different concepts. One does not imply the other, or vice versa. For instance, is this a recursive function (hypothetical language)? global sum = 0 proc accumulate(treeNode) sum += treeNode.Value if treeNode.Left then accumulate(treeNode.Left) if treeNode.Right then accumulate(treeNode.Right) end Obviously it is a recursive ...


8

That article says: "a function can be either reentrant, thread-safe, both, or neither." It also says: "Non-reentrant functions are thread-unsafe". I can see how this may cause a muddle. They mean that standard functions documented as not required to be re-entrant are also not required to be thread-safe, which is true of the POSIX libraries iirc (and ...


8

What unwind originally said is mostly correct - except that it is not limited to multi-threading (also, protecting global data with locks makes it thread safe - but not necessarily re-entrant). [Edit] He's fixed his post to account for this now :-) A function may also be re-entered on the same thread as a result of recursion - either directly or indirectly ...


8

You are mistaken - the locks are obtained at the instance level. There is only one lock in your example because there is only one instance created when you say: Widget w = new LoggingWidget You can view locks (also known as monitors, mutexes or semaphores) as being individually "attached" to every object instance in the JVM. If you had another ...


8

The common thread: Is the behavior well defined if the routine is called while it is interrupted? If you have a function like this: int add( int a , int b ) { return a + b; } Then it is not dependent upon any external state. The behavior is well defined. If you have a function like this: int add_to_global( int a ) { return gValue += a; } The ...


8

No this is not thread-safe at all. The lock has no effect since the object is local to the thread. It needs to be shared by all calling threads. Once you fix that you don't need to use interlocked increment because the lock serialises execution. As a general rule you should place locker at the same level as the resource you are protecting. If the resource ...


7

Let's understand what we mean by re-entrant. A re-entrant function can be invoked before a previous invocation has finished. This might happen if a function is called in a signal handler (or more generally than Unix some interrupt handler) for a signal that was raised during execution of the function a function is called recursively malloc isn't ...


7

For a reentrant lexer, all communication must include the state, which is contained within the scanner. Anywhere in your program (e.g. inside main) you can access the state variables via special functions to which you will pass your scanner. E.g., in your original reentrant.l, you can do this: yyscan_t scanner; yylex_init(&scanner); ...


7

The short answer is that Interrupt Service Routines are not inherently required to be reentrant. Reentrancy is only required in the case of nested interrupts. If the Operating System you use does not support nested interrupts, then you do not need to worry about reentrancy at all. If it does, you may have control over resetting the interrupt you are ...


6

A couple possible solutions: have the real work done in yet another thread delegate that's waiting on an event. The timer callback merely signals the event. The worker thread cannot be reentered, as it's a single thread that does its work only when the event is signaled. The timer is reentrant, since all it does is signal the event (seems a little ...


6

Your code is not thread safe. You should use the lock keyword instead. In your current code: if (doingWork) return; // A thread having entered the function was suspended here by the scheduler. doingWork = true; When the next thread comes through, it will also enter the function. This is why the lock construct should be used. It basically ...



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