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50

I believe what a better comparison is between ReentrantLock and synchronized. ReadWriteLock serves a different purpose and is thus not directly analogous to synchronized. In that code, there appears to be no reason to be using a ReadWriteLock, but it may just be lack of shown code. A ReentrantLock is unstructured, unlike synchronized constructs -- i.e. ...


13

Yes. final and private have no influence, of course, but static means that all instances share the same lock. So if you have two instances, the code block can't be executed by two threads at the same time. If the lock isn't static, each instance gets its own lock. That means that more threads can run the code at the same time (depending on which instance ...


7

You've discovered a major reason why common wisdom says: Don't kill threads! Locks are only one of the potential resource leaks that can happen if you forcibly kill a thread. Consider open files and sockets, etc. Also consider that if you did manage to unlock the lock, there was a reason the lock was locked in the first place. The thread may have ...


7

There are branches of code that will never allow the unlock to be invoked. For instance in add if(head.next==null){ head.addNext(new Node(o,null)); return true; } You return without unlocking. You should follow the lock try finally unlock semantics. lock.lock(); try{ ... do stuff return true; }finally{ lock.unlock(); }


5

First thing's first: dispatch_get_current_queue() is deprecated. The canonical approach would now be to use dispatch_queue_set_specific. One such example might look like: typedef dispatch_queue_t dispatch_recursive_queue_t; static const void * const RecursiveKey = (const void*)&RecursiveKey; dispatch_recursive_queue_t ...


5

You don't need to synchronize simple operations like add or remove because this is handled internally by the implementation and this is precisely why you use them: to avoid handling the synchronization yourself But for composite operations like iterations or multiple removal that are out of the scope of the internal synchronization you must provide your own ...


4

Re-read the javadoc of ReentrantReadWriteLock. It doesn't impose any order between reads and writes. All it does is allowing concurrent reads, but disallowing concurrent writes and writes concurrent with reads. This class has the following properties: Acquisition order This class does not impose a reader or writer preference ordering for ...


4

Spring Webflow operates as a state-machine, executing transitions between different states which might have associated views. It doesn't make sense to have multiple concurrently executing transitions, so SWF uses a locking system to make sure that each flow execution (or conversation) only handles one HTTP request at a time. Don't get too hung up on the ...


3

One Lock can be associated with many Conditions. Lock is an "object", each condition is a "waiting set". This allows for independent conditions sharing critical section. For example, consider bounded producers-consumers problem. One way to solve it is to have one lock that protects the queue, and two independent waiting sets: one for producers, waiting for ...


3

Consider the following case in which you need a set of operations which isn't atomic, be atomic. For example you may want to set a value of an array but return its current value upon setting. (try-finally removed for brevity). final ReentrantLock lock = new ReentrantLock(); final Object[] objects = new Object[10] public Object setAndReturnPrevious(int ...


3

You're not misunderstanding ReentrantLock, you're misunderstanding Condition. A Condition is bound to a lock and Condition.await() will effectively unlock, check and wait, and then relock the lock. See Condition.await(). In a(), between lock() and the call to await(), and between the return of await() and unlock(), your lock is behaving as you expect. ...


3

ReentrantReadWriteLock is a specialized lock whereas synchornized(this) is a general purpose lock. They are similar but not quite the same. You are right in that you could use synchronized(this) instead of ReentrantReadWriteLock but the opposite is not always true. If you'd like to better understand what makes ReentrantReadWriteLock special look up some ...


3

One of the things you should fix is this: ReentrantLock lock; synchronized (mutex) { lock = locks.putIfAbsent(key, new ReentrantLock(true)); if (lock == null) { lock = locks.get(key); } } This misses the whole point of a concurrent map. Why didn't you write it like this: ReentrantLock lock = new ReentrantLock(true); final ReentrantLock oldLock ...


3

Your consumer must await while holding the lock (as the javadocs for the method state). also, you shouldn't be using tryLock, you should just be using lock. you only use tryLock if you are going to do something else if lock acquisition fails. in your case, if lock acquisition fails, you just try to acquire it again.


3

If thread A has modified some object inside a code block CB1 guarded by the lock and then releases the lock, and thread B enters in a code block guarded by the same lock, then thread B will see the modifications done by thread A in the code block CB1. If two threads read and write the same shared state, then every read and write to this state should be ...


3

To answer your questions: 1: public synchronized void addBooking(Booking booking) { bookings.add(booking); } is equivalent to public void addBooking(Booking booking) { synchronized (this){ bookings.add(booking); } } 2: for your example you should not use ReentrantLock. Calling methods of a list that has been initialized with ...


3

Consider this theoretical example: You are using a lock to protect some back-end data while updating some items in a list box in your GUI. You loop through and modify the items. While doing so, the list box fires an event (perhaps a Selection Changed event or something) for which you have a handler registered. This handler also locks the same lock in order ...


3

The API documentation for ReentrantLock says (my emphasis): The constructor for this class accepts an optional fairness parameter. When set true, under contention, locks favor granting access to the longest-waiting thread. Otherwise this lock does not guarantee any particular access order. Programs using fair locks accessed by many threads may ...


3

Would you be allowed to use your own Lock? Here's a class that completely proxies the Lock but when it is told to force the unlock it merely replaces the lock it is proxying with a new one. This should have the effect you want. Sadly it still does not deal with the locks that are left dangling but that now becomes somebody else's problem. Your locks are now ...


3

1) Does not ReentrantLocks being released if the thread that holds it terminates expectedly? Lock release only when you call Lock#unlock() explicitly. That why recommend to invoke Lock#unlock() in finally block to prevent deadlocks in your application. 2) Is there any difference between while (queue.isEmpty()) { and if (queue.isEmpty()) { in the ...


3

No, you should not do that. If you do it, any concurrent thread could acquire the lock in the middle of the bar() method, which is precisely what you want to avoid by using a lock. It's called ReentrantLock precisely because it allows acquiring the lock multiple times in the same thread. A counter is incremented each time lock() is called, and decremented ...


3

Since Java 1.5(?) there is JVM support for hardware locking using so called Compare-And-Swap methods. Just follow the sources until the point when this is called. Also see Doug Lea's paper for better understanding: http://gee.cs.oswego.edu/dl/papers/aqs.pdf


2

I think your problem is this line if (!((String) msg.getObject()).matches("IP_RESPONSE:[0-9.]*")) return; Which means under some condition you acquire the lock and never release it. Always use try...finally blocks with Lock to avoid this issue. protected void handleMessage(Message msg) { lock.lock(); try { if (!((String) ...


2

Reentrant locks are useful in cases where a resource cannot tolerate all forms of arbitrarily-timed accesses, but can tolerate certain patterns of access which can occur in nested execution contexts. In many cases their usage is unaesthetic and sloppy, but it may be easier to arrange things so that a reentrant lock can be guaranteed to work than it would be ...


2

There's no magic in it. You're safe if, and only if, all threads accessing an object use the same lock - be it a ReentrantLock or any other mutex, such as a synchronized block. The existence ReentrantLock is justified by that it provides more flexibility than synchronized: you can, for example, just try to acquire the lock - not possible with synchronized.


2

It's ... a (mutex) lock: void myMethod() { myLock.lock(); // block until condition holds try { // Do stuff that only one thread at a time should do } finally { myLock.unlock() } } Only one thread can hold the lock at a time, so anything between the lock() and unlock() calls is guaranteed to only be ...


2

You can use Semaphore instead of ReentrantLock, its permits are not bound to thread. Something like this (not sure what you want to do with the result of job.call() in the asynchronous case): final static Semaphore lock = new Semaphore(1); public void runJob(String desc, Callable job, boolean wait) { logger.info("Acquiring lock"); if ...


2

The implementation will likely be different per JDK. Sun (now Oracle) implementation, for example, does it via sun.misc.Unsafe ( http://www.docjar.com/docs/api/sun/misc/Unsafe.html ) I once blogged about how Java concurrency in unsafe :)


2

According to the javadoc, the jdk implementation does not have any reader/writer priority. however, if you use the "fair" implementation, then the lock is granted in fifo order (still no reader/writer preference), so at least future readers will not block waiting writers.


2

Your call to condition.await(); will release the lock, leaving the thread in a wait state, so thread b can just acquire the lock. Your a() method will continue to run once b() has released it's lock, since you signaled the condition.



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