Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

The assignment is just that. The string pointer is basically a label that points to specific address in memory. Reassignment statement would point that label to another address in memory! It doesn't change reference counting or do anything beyond that in Objective-C. You need to maintain the reference count yourself, if you are running in a ...


14

With the exception of the already mentionned TR1 shared_ptr, there is no reference-counted pointer in STL. I suggest you use boost::shared_ptr (downloading boost will be enough, there is nothing to compile, its implementation is header-only). You may also want to have a look at smart pointers from Loki libraries (again, header-only implementation). For an ...


11

From the assembly code it can be seen that accessing weakPtr generates a objc_loadWeak call. According to the Clang documentation, objc_loadWeak retains and autoreleases the object and is equivalent to id objc_loadWeak(id *object) { return objc_autorelease(objc_loadWeakRetained(object)); } This (hopefully) explains why both if(strongPtr == weakPtr) ...


9

If you don't want/can't use Boost and your compiler implements TR1, you can use shared_ptr (borrowed from Boost): #include <tr1/memory> ... std::tr1::shared_ptr<Foo> ptr(new Foo); Otherwise, no, there are no smart pointers except std::auto_ptr in vanilla STL.


4

dynamic_cast must not be used on multiple reasons: You don't know if destination supports RTTI You not sure if OLE doesn't create proxy for you ... Instead use QueryInterface - it would done what you want. Even if you sure in question above - casting doesn't changes refcounter


3

Reference counts for COM objects are incremented when someone calls IUnknown::AddRef(). QueryInterface(), according to COM rules since it gives out a new interface pointer, internally calls AddRef(). In your posted code, you're not calling AddRef(), and you're not calling any function that might call AddRef(), so why would you think the reference count ...


3

Declaring propertyName as a "weak" property means two things: When you assign an object to propertyName, that object's reference count is not incremented. When the object that propertyName points to is deallocated, propertyName will be set to nil. Assigning the value of propertyName to another variable may or may not have any impact on the reference ...


2

If variants of FOO are versioned and properly cumulative (this is key to all installation technologies that operate on shared locations), and if your component is shared, shares the same GUID in both products (if MSI), and shares the same installation location, then everything will work. As parts of that list of conditions are made untrue, various bad things ...


2

What does the following line actually do? string = @"Some text"; Assuming that "string" is declared thusly in the header: NSString *string; What does the "=" actually do here? What does it do to "string"'s reference count? string is not a string. string is, in fact, not any other kind of Cocoa object, either. string is a variable, which ...


1

Have a look at this article: Overloading New in C++ . You could overload the new operator for ObjectBase so that it takes your allocator as a parameter and does the rest of the job: void *ObjectBase::operator new(size_t size, Allocator *allocator) { void *ptr = allocator->allocate(size); // Hack to pre-initialize member before constructor is called ...


1

If you are truly looking for a solution, use separate DLLs. This is simple and reliable, and in fact it's easier to talk about (as you have demonstrated when you mention FOO_a and FOO_b). It also avoids the error message, which is not helpful for your users. Windows did have a reference counting scheme for shared DLLs, but it was by convention, so it was ...


1

No one can possibly begin to answer your question without knowing what installation technology you are using. InstallShield is a product that supports many different frameworks. Windows only keeps track of shared references on DLL files. ( SharedDllCount ). Windows Installer ( assuming you are even using it ) also keeps track of Compoent reference ...


1

For COM objects, use CComPtr<>.


1

if you don't want the files to be common, why in the world are you placing them in the same directory? I would rather put them in different location. Now suppose your FOO_a is being used by many programs at the same version, then for FOO_b which is required by your new program and others that might be added later, add another similar common directory and ...


1

First, don’t experiment with weak references or other memory management behaviour on NSString, there’s too much magic in that class. Not that weak references wouldn’t work with NSString, just the behaviour is slightly trickier than you would expect and easily leads to incorrect conclusions. See these previous questions: Weak attritube don't work as ...


1

std::unique_ptr is an example of smart-pointer without a reference counter. It retains the sole ownership of an object and destroys the object once the unique_ptr goes out of scope.


1

Ok, I will answer my own question so that others do not fall into the same problem. @DarkDust was actually correct. there was a tiny line which I was completely ignoring: **retriesNumber++;** It looks like an innocent sentence, but because retriesNumber is a member of the class, it is actually meaning (INVISIBLE strong pointer to self)->retriesNumber ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible