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59

Is it a bad idea to use the dot notation to initialize retain properties to nil in my init methods? Yes, it is a bad idea. 1) The object has already been zeroed in the alloc+init sequence, so it is not necessary to assign it nil. In other words, this call is useless unless you have side effects in your accessors (side effects in accessors should also ...


56

What are the advantages and disadvantages of using the new automatic reference counting (ARC) memory management style in an iOS project? An ARC program's execution is nearly identical to well written MRC. That is, the behavioral differences are often undetectable because both the order of operations and performance are very close. If you already know ...


41

Use direct access in partially constructed states, regardless of ARC: - (id)initWithReminder:(Reminder*)reminder_ { self = [super init]; if (self) { reminder = reminder_; // OR reminder = [reminder_ retain]; } return self; } This is because self.whatever will trigger other side effects, such as Key-Value Observing ...


27

"What is the best way to implement smart pointers in C++" Don't! Use an existing, well tested smart pointer, such as boost::shared_ptr or std::tr1::shared_ptr (std::unique_ptr and std::shared_ptr with C++ 11) If you have to, then remember to: use safe-bool idiom provide an operator-> provide the strong exception guarantee document the exception ...


26

Brad Abrams posted an e-mail from Brian Harry written during development of the .Net framework. It details many of the reasons reference counting was not used, even when one of the early priorities was to keep semantic equivalence with VB6, which uses reference counting. It looks into possibilities such as having some types ref counted and not others ...


25

The garbage collector does not require you to write a Dispose method for every class/type that you define. You only define one when you need to explicitly do something to cleanup ; when you have explicitly allocated native resources. Most of the time, the GC just reclaims memory even if you only do something like new() up an object. The GC does reference ...


23

Game *newGame = [[Game alloc] init];//error 1 You create a new instance and you own it since you’ve used +alloc. newGame = [gamesArray objectAtIndex:gameNumber]; You obtain another instance from gamesArray and assign it to the same variable that was used in the previous line. This means that you’ve lost the reference to the previous object and, since ...


23

To start with, a point of terminology: "garbage collection" means different things to different people, and some GC schemes are more sophisticated than others. Some people consider reference counting to be a form of GC, but personally I consider "true GC" to be distinct from reference counting. With refcounts, there is an integer tracking the number of ...


22

The basics: What are the official reasons to not use retainCount? Autorelease management is the most obvious -- you have no way to be sure how many of the references represented by the retainCount are in a local or external (on a secondary thread, or in another thread's local pool) autorelease pool. Also, some people have trouble with leaks, and at a ...


21

I found this article, which cites Microsoft's Martyn Lovell: "WinRT objects are reference counted like COM for memory management, with weak references to avoid circularity." Apparently this was mentioned at his talk on WinRT internals at the BUILD convention.


20

I think that more and more sdt::string implementations will move away from refcounting/copy-on-write as it is often a counter-optimization in multi-threaded code. See Herb Sutter's article Optimizations That Aren't (In a Multithreaded World).


18

You've misused just every C++ concept possible and this causes errors. When delete p; is called for the first time C++ calls the Cat::~Cat() destructor which implicitly destroys the std::string inside the entity. When delete p; is called the second time Cat::~Cat() is rerun and it reruns the destructor of the std::string and this causes undefined behavour ...


18

We can get some information from the shared_ptr::use_count() function. §20.7.2.2.5 says: long use_count() const noexcept; Returns: the number of shared_ptr objects, *this included, that share ownership with *this, or 0 when *this is empty. [Note: use_count() is not necessarily efficient.—end note ] At first sight the long return type seems to ...


17

shared_ptr represents ownership relation. While weak_ptr represents awareness. Having several objects owning each other means you have problems with architecture, which is solved by changing one or more own's into aware of's (that is, weak_ptr's). I don't get why suggesting weak_ptr is considered useless.


17

The with preserved word in Pascal/Delphi is only used for easily accessing the members of records or objects/classes (i.e. in order not to mention the record's/object's/class's name). It's very different from the C# with that relates to garbage collection. It has existed in the Pascal language since the day records were born, to simplify code calling to many ...


16

Reference counting was tried in C#. I believe, the folks that released Rotor (a reference implementation of CLR for which the source was made available) did reference counting-based GC just to see how it would compare to the generational one. The result was surprising -- the "stock" GC was so much faster, it was not even funny. I don't remember exactly where ...


16

It's to make all object handling uniform. If I'm writing C code that handles a return value from a function, I have to increment and decrement the reference count on that object. If the function returns me True, I don't want to have to check to see if it's one of those special objects to know whether to manipulate its reference count. I can treat all ...


16

He discusses this in more detail somewhere, I think in his atomic<> weapons presentation. Basically it's all about where the memory fences are needed in the shared_ptr use case, not any intrinsic property of atomic increments vs decrements. The reason is that you don't really care about the exact ordering of increments with a ref counted smart pointer ...


15

TInterfacedObject itself is not reference counted, only interfaces are. You can implement interfaces using TInterfacedObject which basically saves you the effort of implementing the reference counting methods yourself. Unfortunately it still will not work in your case: The compiler does not know that you are assigning interfaces to the TTreeNode.Data ...


15

Your question is based on a faulty assumption. It's perfectly possible to have circular references and immutable data. Consider the following C# example which uses immutable data to create a circular reference. class Node { public readonly Node other; public Node() { other = new Node(this); } public Node(Node node) { other = node; } } ...


15

Relative to other managed languages like Java and C#, purely functional languages allocate like crazy. They also allocate objects of different sizes. The fastest known allocation strategy is to allocate from contiguous free space (sometimes called a "nursery") and to reserve a hardware register to point to the next available free space. Allocation from ...


15

The WeakReference class hands off its object reference to the GC and gets a handle back. Whenever you get the reference or check if the reference is alive, the handle is used to ask the GC for the reference. This means that the GC keeps a list of all weak references, which it has to update when objects are collected. It also means that there is some ...


15

Make the reference counting atomic and you won't need any lock. In Windows ::InterlockedIncrement and ::InterlockedDecrement can be used. In C++ 0x, you have atomic<>.


14

If you have problems determining the correct way (place, order and so on) of destroying standard objects in a Delphi program, then using reference counted objects or interfaces instead will not help you at all. I understand that you want the nodes in a graph to keep references to each other, and when there are no references left to an object, it should be ...


13

Test this: function RefCount(const _s: AnsiString): integer; var ptr: PLongWord; begin ptr := Pointer(_s); Dec(Ptr, 2); Result := ptr^; end; function Add(const S: string): string; begin Result:= S; end; procedure TForm9.Button1Click(Sender: TObject); var s1: string; s2: string; begin s1:= 'Hello'; UniqueString(s1); s2:= s1; ...


13

Each running thread constitutes a root for the GC. Any object reachable from one of the roots is not eligible for GC, and the thread has a thread-local reference to the java.lang.Thread instance (returned by Thread.currentThread()). So no, your thread won't be GCed until it ends running, since the Thread instance is reachable from the running thread. I ...


12

Refcount is only modified when you assign to an interface variable, not to an object variable. procedure testMF(); var c1, c2 : TTestClass; Intf1, Intf2 : IUnknown; begin c1 := TTestClass.Create(); // create, does NOT addref c2 := c1; // does NOT addref Intf1 := C2; //Here it does addref Intf2 := C1; //Here, it does AddRef again ...


12

Each JVM is different, but the HotSpot JVM does not primarily rely on reference counting as a means for garbage collection. Reference counting has the advantage of being simple to implement, but it is inherently error-prone. In particular, if you have a reference cycle (a set of objects that all refer to one another in a cycle), then reference counting ...


12

tl;dr This is all by design – it's just that the design changes between XE2 and XE3. XE3 and later There is quite a difference between delegation to an interface type property and delegation to a class type property. Indeed the documentation calls out this difference explicitly with different sections for the two delegation variants. The difference from ...


11

In addition to what Mehrdad said, the return value of Release is intended for debugging purposes only. Production code should just ignore it. Looping until Release() returns 0 is definitely a bug - you should never release references you don't own.



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