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6

You can't make an object null, you can only make a reference null. Updating one reference to an object doesn't change other references to the same object. Think about it like us both having the same person's number in our phones: if I delete the number, it doesn't get deleted from your phone. And if we both delete it, that person's phone number doesn't ...


4

You are on the right track with that conclusion. For every iteration of the loop, you've assigned this.button to be equal to the button at that index of the loop. If we break this out, it looks like; this.button = buttons[0] this.button = buttons[1] this.button = buttons[2] And so on until it reaches the end of the loop. Once it reaches the end of the ...


3

You are trying to pass pointer-to-pointer-to-TTree to a function that expects reference-to-TTree. Try redeclare it like void initialize(TTree* &tree_); Invokation will look like tpb.initialize(tree_); And then you can initialize outer pointer via simple assignment: void initialize(TTree* &tree_) { tree_ = new TTree(); // or smth else }


3

You can't. While the local variable name is in scope, the name name denotes the local variable. And there is no "qualifier" to refer to top-level identifiers. Spec: Declarations and scope: An identifier declared in a block may be redeclared in an inner block. While the identifier of the inner declaration is in scope, it denotes the entity declared by ...


3

This is what is happening: An array is just a contiguous chunk of memory. &test Is getting the address of that index of the starting point of array. Not the value. When you add [some number], it counts up the number times the size of the data type, in this case each char is a byte. So when you do &test[i] that means the starting address + i ...


3

It should become a bit more obvious when you consider what the array indexing is actually doing. Given an array test, you usually access the nth element of test with test[n]. However, this is actually the equivalent of *(test+n). This is because addition on pointers automatically multiplies the amount you add with the size of the type being pointed to. This ...


3

All variables in Python are references. Elementary data types aren't an exception. In the first example, you reassign b. It no longer references the same object as a. In the second example, you modify b. Since you've previously set a and b to be references to the same object, the modification applies to a as well.


3

The problem is with Node struct. Class initialization order is not dependent on order of initializations specified in cosntructor, but rather on order of declaration of variables. You are basicaly initializing double& with some weird, unitialized stuff, which is undefined behaviour. Change order of declarations to struct Node { Vec3 v; double &...


1

Yes you are creating a copy in this line: XSSFCellStyle xssf__CellStyle = xssf__Workbook.CreateCellStyle(); It should be noted that the copy is not, as you implied, created by returning the reference, but rather by initializing a new value with the returned reference. If you want to avoid a copy you should either store the result in a reference or in a ...


1

That's not how you initialize a reference. Use: list<int>& current = <variable>; // list; list is a poor choice of variable name. Using list<int> list; will result in compiler error since you have: using namespace std; list will be terrible variable name even if you hadn't used using namespace std; I suggest removing the ...


1

Okay since Andy pointed out that you can not destroy a object itself you can still have a work-around. interface RemoveAble<T>{ boolean isRemoved(); T prepareRemoveAndGet(); } class Bird implements RemoveAble<Bird>{ boolean shouldRemove = false; @Override public boolean isRemoved() { return shouldRemove; ...


1

The pointer of the original collection is copied. All references will be passed by value. This mean that if you have: ClassA { String fieldA="Hello"; } ClassA elementToChange; List<ClassA> originalCollection; originalCollection(elementToChange); List<ClassA> newCollection; newCollection.addAll(originalCollection); elementToChange.fieldA =...


1

Easy fix: You can access a control on Form1 directly from Form2 So if you have DataGridView1 on Form1, in the Form2 code you can access it by using Form1.DataGridView1 Note: this is not a good design, because you are tightly coupling your two forms, you would be better to pass a reference to a DataGridView into Form2 rather than updating it directly in ...


1

You need to pass a reference-to-Form1 to Form2. Use the Me keyword to get a reference to the object currently executing: In Form1.vb: Sub Form1_OpenForm2() Dim form2 As New Form2() form2.AcceptForm1( Me ) form2.Show() End Sub In Form2.vb: Private _form1 As Form1 Public Sub AcceptForm1(form1 As Form1) _form1 = form1 End Sub


1

For a better grasp of this kind of issues, I would encourage you to use the Online Python Tutor. This is an extremely handy tool that renders a graphical representation of the objects in memory while the code is executed step by step. To show the Online Python Tutor in action I have splitted a toy example into small snippets and then captured the ...



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